Technology

Boeing’s UV Wand Combats Coronavirus Germs

1 December 2020By Laura Shaughnessy
Courtesy of Healthe

Written by

Laura Shaughnessy

Laura Shaughnessy has been the managing editor at Dockwalk since February 2018. Having grown up among the cornfields, she is ecstatic to be among the boats in the yachting capital of the world. Armed with a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s in journalism, 15 years of experience with newspapers, magazines, and the online world, Laura has joined a great crew. When not writing about superyacht crew, she’s hanging out with her husband and their German Shepherd, working on house projects, or binging on Netflix.

A year ago, keeping things sanitized wasn’t the sexiest topic, but during COVID-19, it’s top of mind. Enter the Healthe Wand Pro Boeing-licensed sanitization wand, which can combat coronavirus germs for a number of commercial applications. Boeing designed and developed the ultraviolet wand for aircraft interior sanitation; after six months of R&D, the working model prototype is coming to the world with Healthe Inc. and the official product will become available for purchase in February 2021.

“The wand is just one part of a layered approach to safe travel,” says Fred Maxik, founder and CSO of Healthe. “The UV wand is designed to be more effective and far more powerful than similar devices. Our wand uses 222 nanometer Far-UVC light to inactivate pathogens on high-touch surfaces within seconds. It is another powerful sanitization tool to help keep people safe,” he says, adding that Healthe produced the wand, which is being distributed to airlines in December 2020.

“The wand is designed to provide powerful disinfection while remaining portable and easy to use in compact spaces, like an airplane cockpit or a ship’s bridge. Since it is self-contained and can be used regularly to disinfect surfaces within seconds, it’s a perfect tool to use to add another layer of protection on a voyage for captains, crew, and guests,” Maxik says. “A growing library of evidence, including independent research backed by many peer-reviewed scientific and medical journals, demonstrates that Far-UVC light is effective at inactivating viral particles in the air and on surfaces and is safe for use in indoor environments,” he says.

This article originally ran in the December 2020 issue of Dockwalk.

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