Food & Wine

Dandelion Chocolate and a Tesla Engineer Redesign the Chocolate Chip

1 March 2021By Laura Shaughnessy

Written by

Laura Shaughnessy

Laura Shaughnessy has been the managing editor at Dockwalk since February 2018. Having grown up among the cornfields, she is ecstatic to be among the boats in the yachting capital of the world. Armed with a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s in journalism, 15 years of experience with newspapers, magazines, and the online world, Laura has joined a great crew. When not writing about superyacht crew, she’s hanging out with her husband and their German Shepherd, working on house projects, or binging on Netflix.

While Tesla is known for their electric cars and clean energy, their engineers sometimes branch off in other areas. Take Remy Labesque, a Los Angeles-based industrial engineer who works for Elon Musk. In May 2020, he re-invented the chocolate chip after partnering up with Executive Pastry Chef Lisa Vega of Dandelion Chocolate. The new recipe comes in a large and small version, both in a 3D shape.

Considering the chocolate chip cookie was born in 1938 by Ruth Wakefield who ran the Toll House restaurant in Massachusetts, this is no small feat. According to an article on Dandelion Chocolate’s website, it took three years to create. “The shape of our chip is faceted,” Labesque told Dandelion Chocolate. “The edges of a Dandelion Chocolate chip taper to thin as we could make ’em without compromising structure. This is because the thermal mass of a thin piece of chocolate melts more quickly on the palate. So when you put a Dandelion chip on your tongue, the thin, chiseled edges warm-to-melt nearly instantly.

Tesla Industrial Engineer Remy Labesque

“The 3D shape, while simple, we believe is also novel,” he said. “This is noteworthy because the world of industrial design is running out of simple forms that haven’t been claimed for something already. Beyond that, we’re proud to have optimized the chocolate chip eating experience as a result of rethinking the humble shape itself.”

Tesla Industrial Engineer Remy Labesque's sketches and molds

And it all started in 2013 when Labesque took a Chocolate 101 class led by Dandelion Chocolate’s founder, Todd Masonis who taught the class about bean-to-bar chocolate. That’s when he reportedly fell in love with the brand. Since then, he’s collaborated with the chocolate brand on several projects, like the House Hot Chocolate to-go coffee cup with cookie holster, their European Hot Chocolate to-go tray with cookie and marshmallow, as well as their Hot Chocolate Mix in a bottle.

Dandelion's Chocolate Chips come in 3D-shaped versions

… All we’re saying is we’d be happy to taste-test these cookies to see if they’re half as good as they make it sound.

Follow Dandelion Chocolate on Instagram @DandelionChocolate.

This column is taken from the March 2021 issue of Dockwalk.

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