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National Diploma in Marine Engineering ??
Cammy
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 1:58 PM
Joined: 08/05/2012
Posts: 3


Hi guys , Id like some proffesional advice as far as getting a national diploma ( Two years ) goes. I plan on getting an AEC course done and then after that doing the diploma. Id be studying in South Africa my home country as its cheaper. Is this diploma sought after in the industry? would it be worth doing this ? Thanks
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2012 11:16 PM
UK MCA accept some, not all certificates from non-UK countries. As far as engineering courses goes, any courses and training will be beneficial and give you a better understanding of all things engineering.
Be aware, that doing the course in SA that you mention, although good for you, knowledge and information wise, may not be recognised by MCA, I dont know. You should check with MCA to see if they recognise the course in any way shape or form, if so, thats great. If not, then two years is a chunk of time and cost that may not get you where you think you might like to be. Is a SA diploma sought after in the Superyacht industry? I have been working as engineer for 12 years in the industry now, I have never seen or heard of one. 
Check with MCA, and then you could make a better decision. Good luck.

SBC
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2012 10:30 AM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 33


As always when doing training meant to be useful across borders, there is a few things to watch out for: If you want to work at sea, firstly check that the final certificate you aim for is denominated "STCW 95" Make sure that is will give you competences relevant to the career path you wish to,follow. Make sure that the issuing country is on the IMO white list over approved countries. For full terminology and info, etc, search the Internet. imo.org or pya.org are good places to start. When on the Internet, be very wary of chat rooms, like Dockwalk etc. they are full of self professed experts and loads of myths! Check, then double check, getting info from proper sources, like IMO, MCA, PYA, or other maritime authorities. If in doubt, fire off a friendly e mail to the relevant authorities. They normally will answer you back within a few weeks. MCA and the red ensign flag states are big players in yachting, and important ones, but they are not the only ones. By ensuring that your certificate is STCW compliant, you can work on (almost) any flag state vessel. The vessel flag state will, if needed, issue a Certificate of Equivalency, or CeC. Don't always take the college's claims as to compliance for granted. Check it out yourself, and don't be afraid to ask awkward questions. It is your future! Good luck. Soren
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 12:35 AM
Who cares what the MCA says about a course in South Africa? Take the diploma course if it is accredited by the SAMSA. Then pursue your engineer's license in SAF. The licenses issued by SAMSA are white listed and accepted by all major flags, including the Red Ensign. The MCA Y-licenses are OK for yachts, but many of them are not STCW and are 100% restricted to yachts. If the industry tanks again, like in 2008-2009, your SAF license will be much better than the MCA Y tickets.
Jeff Owen
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 8:42 AM
Joined: 21/03/2010
Posts: 5


Hi Cammy. 1. A two year course for the National Diploma in Marine Engineering does not exist. I have the Diploma. The Diploma is awarded after a Cadetship in Marine Engineering. 4 year duration. Apply at Smit Amandla in Cape Town. Unicorn Lines in Durban. Safmarine/Maersk. I did my training with Safmarine. MCA recognises all SAMSA Certificates of Competency as Equivalent. Note that the Diploma only allows you to sail as Junior Engineer in Commercial fleet. You will then need 18-24months on board sea time minimum to do your Class 2 exams. This will require 6 months at CPUT or NUT. After passing subjects you will be required to do an oral exam with the SAMSA Examiners. Another 18-24 on board sea time holding Class 2 will enable you to do your Class 1 COC. This requires another 6 months at CPUT Naval Academy or NUT. After passing the subjects you present yourself for the final Oral exam by SAMSA Examiner. South African Marine Engineers have an exceptionaly good record globaly. At sea and ashore.
Jeff Owen
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 8:47 AM
Joined: 21/03/2010
Posts: 5


Just confirming that I am a South African Marine Engineer. Good to meet you. All SAMSA Certificates are recognised as Equivalent by MCA. The two year chunk consideration is good advice for consideration. Actual time to become a Chief Engineer in Commercial Marine is a minimum of 9 years. Work on 12 years with rotations.
Jeff Owen
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 8:52 AM
Joined: 21/03/2010
Posts: 5


Hi Soren, Like your advice. Sounds like you have been around the block a few times. South African equivalent to MCA is SAMSA. South African Maritime Safety Association. All Certificates issued are Equivalent and STCW compliant.
Jeff Owen
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 9:15 AM
Joined: 21/03/2010
Posts: 5


Actually, MCA does have a lot of influence in the Superyacht Industry. SAMSA does not get involved with Engineering Examinations for Yachts, viz Y4-Y1. Obvious reason is that their is no Superyacht Industry on our coast. A Cadet candidate needs to have min Matric with Maths and Science at Higher Grade. N6 Level Maths and Science at FET College. Only the AEC and MEOL courses are available in South Africa. Durban. Interesting to note that only Y4-Y2 courses available in UK/Europe. Y1 is only an oral examination based on Y2 theory. This is to obtain an endorsement. Commercial Class 2 Unlimitted is equivalent. Legally, MCA courses and guidelines are for Red Ensign vessels only. However, I appreciate that the PYA has gone down the road with them to formalise training and certification for the Yacht Industry. Well done. There is no difference to the Practical Engineering knowledge required between Yacht and Commercial Plants.
SBC
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 10:22 AM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 33


Hi Jeff, Well, it looks like the guy got lucky with his advice, good on you for spending the time. Cheers, Soren
Jeff Owen
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 1:18 PM
Joined: 21/03/2010
Posts: 5


Thanks Soren. Good advice seems to be lacking in the industry. Saffas trying their best but a lot of issues to contend with that don't make it an easy career choice. It is my wish that more Saffas get involved with the industry. The challenges need to be faced and the outcome both character building and rewarding. Safe sailing.
UKEngineer
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2013 9:09 PM
Joined: 19/01/2010
Posts: 36


You could always come to Britain and do one of these City & Guilds Diplomas, they exist here if not in SA: http://mitec.pembrokeshire.ac.uk/index.php?page=Engineering; http://cdn.cityandguilds.com/ProductDocuments/Transport_Maintenance/Marine/2463/2463_Level_3/Centre_documents/2463_03_L3_Dip_Qualification_handbook_v2.pdf, or at Falmouth Marine School: http://www.cornwall.ac.uk/falmouth/index.php?page=shared&subpage=_Course_Finder&keyword=&pagetitle=Marine%20Construction,%20Systems%20Engineering%20and%20Maintenance%20CG%20Diploma%20Level%203%20&pagetype=3&SCH=0&PTL=0&PTQ=0&HEF=0&CCB=0&DL=0&WBL=0&ALEVEL=0&coursecode=212054&ucascode=&partner_reference=ALL&chosencampus=falmouth&toggle=0;  http://cdn.cityandguilds.com/ProductDocuments/Transport_Maintenance/Marine/2451/2451_Level_3/Centre_documents/2451_L3_Qualification_handbook_v5.pdf
The contents of these courses are complex and the colleges may only offer some components, but I know people who have gone onto Merchant Navy sponsorship and training after completing them. So you will be on the right track with one under your belt. Good luck.
 
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