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chief stews
John
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 8:26 AM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 78


Simple question....why do chief stews command top dollars with the justification based on education. OOW is a minimum for officers and it costs three years on scene experiance with a 30,000 dollar price tag. Cheif engineers....15 years experience commercial, five years yachting if they have the social skills. and about 50.000 us in school. First mate......5 years and 40 grand. Cheif stew......one night with a captain and two years in a bad restaurant. Show me a cheif stew with 10 years hotel restaurant management and a university degree in hospitality and tourism and after a trial period i will give her a good salary. That includes management, accounting, cost management, flower arranging, and everything else. Problem is, captains dont know and need what they think does..........
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 9:06 AM
Simple question and simple answer. The chief stewardess or any stewardess is the public face of the yacht. They interact, one on one, with the guests. If they are poor at their job the image of the entire yacht suffers. No guest will ever know that you keep your engine room immaculate and all safety gear ready for action. Many times after a week out, guests still do not know my name !!! but they will inevitably comment on how nice and bubbly our stewardess is. I also resent having to pay 3000 euros a month for a young stewardess but as they say...its the life and remember...work em hard !!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 2:55 PM

[comment edited by moderator]

"work 'em hard???", people like you are a good reason why people quit this business.


Henning
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 4:22 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


It's quite simple, they get paid what they do because its what the market demands and will bear. The number itself is of course flexible and negotiable. If the owner and guests are happy with the interior of the boat, and I am happy with the interior of the boat and the stew is a good member of a cohesive crew, I don't see a problem with paying good money for one. And saying "One night with the captain..." is insulting to captains. It takes at least 3 nights....
junior
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 6:19 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


Careful Henning...put aside market forces when negotiating salaries and look at the reality of a Stewardess working the bread and butter Mediterranean scene. Season over...job over. Stewardesses are the first to go. Its just the way it works. The problem for both You and Me is that we need a readily available supply of experienced stewardess's to do our job. If stewardess's don't make enough money during their shortened work year they will not hang around till next year and be available again. They will throw in the towel and leave the industry. Pay them well, treat them well. One of the big shortages around the water is experienced stewardess's who know the scene and can get on with the job from the moment your hire them.
Chief
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 9:37 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 342


[Comment deleted by moderator]

 



Henning
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 10:31 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


I fully agree Junior, note I say that if they are good, I have no problem paying them well. I need good stews, and that is part of the market force.
Chief
Posted: Monday, October 12, 2009 10:38 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 342


"[Comment deleted by moderator]"

Geez, no sense of humor at all!

Let me try another angle. Be careful Henning, 3 in a row might be considered a legal contract in some places. I will leave out the reference to getting yourself into a (culinary product comprised of mixed vegatables and cuts of beef)

Note to moderator: If you are offended why not just delete the bits that offend and leave the rest?  A broad stroke of the censor's pen makes it is impossible to determine exactly where the boundaries lie. Cutting the entire post leaves the impression that it was obscene, vulgar, imflammatory, or worse, without providing guidance to others.

In the case of my last deleted post a bit of harmless and G-rated humor was removed ... why?


Henning
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2009 2:40 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


Heck the mod removed a compliment I paid to TiffanyS that had no profanity or sexual reference in the slightest.
Chief
Posted: Tuesday, October 13, 2009 4:05 AM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 342


Ahh, that explains it then. Mine didn't either ... unless getting into a daube or a burgoo is considered rude.
Dùghall
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 5:13 PM
Joined: 11/09/2008
Posts: 2


I have taken 10 years to get my chief stews paid a decent salary and still hear of a lot of others getting paid a pittance in comparison to the job they do. I have seen AEC's as second engineers get paid more than 10 year veterans.
The good ones are worth a lot more than any rubbish engineer or deck same as a good engineer or deck is worth more than a rubbish stew. So what if they do not have to take x number of years to get a qualification but you try and get an engineer or a deckhand to clean toilets for a living. Fat chance of that. So as you do not give them credit where credit is due then cash go a long way to keeping good stew.
People with that attitiude have no place whatsover on any boat I run.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 5:28 PM
Pah!!! Men!! So egotistical. No wonder stewardesses don't want to stick around too long in this industry. Do you really think that you deserve such high salaries for sitting round the crews mess watching telly, while the girls get on with running the boats? I am sure that your beef has nothing to do with salaries and more to do with the fact you can't get any stew to polish your personals (bit of advice for you, stop being so arrogant and you'd have a bit of luck.... although i doubt it) And I'll preempt your 'feminist lesbian' response with this bit of evidence. I started off as a stewardess (working up to 18 hour days) and am now a first mate...... NEVER had it so easy!!!! Polish that up!!!!
Chief
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 5:39 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 342


Geez Dughall and Anon, chill out. It looks like only the original post questioned the value of a stew. The others are either in defense of the pay and value of a good one or just silly jokes that in no way reflect negatively on the position or what it takes to do a good job.

That does leave room for a discussion of reading comprehension and temperament though 


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 6:37 PM
I'm sorry I guess I must have misinterpreted the original post. See, I thought he said that in order for a girl to progress as a stewardess she had to spend one night with a captain (who is obviously a man - this goes without saying)...... or sorry was it three nights? I get mixed up, you know, because I'm a girl!!! My question to the forum is this then, what are the value of men on board??? Just because a member of crew is qualified, does this in turn mean, that they can be as lazy as they wish and hide behind their certification?
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 7:09 PM
It may seem that it is politically correct to earn more money as OOW or any other, but I have to agree that most Stewardesses eat up a lot more of what goes on on the inside that most of you down under playing with your engines.... AGREED we are the face of the boat....
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 7:17 PM
A chief stew doesn't necessarily need to be good at his/her job. If they are good at "managing" a hardworking and unquestioning bunch on underlings it is quiet easy for them to bluff their way through each day. Some chief stews work on yachts with an extra imaginary 20 metres of length and like to play a purser roles that they deserve. I've seen computer network engineers spend less time in front of a screen than the average chief stew. And with respect to toilets, I work on deck and do clean the toilets and fold the stupid toilet rolls when guests are on even when they don't. Try cleaning the tanks at the end of the season.
Rachael
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 7:29 PM
Joined: 30/01/2009
Posts: 1


I dont think high Chief Stew salaries are based on education. They should be based on ability to do the job and time spent in the industry....It is a little annoying, even to us Stew's, that Stew's with only a few years experience are demanding high salaries but that is unfortanetly because the good, experienced Stews are few and far between.

Education isn't everything when it comes to the best person for the job. I feel some engineers are WAY overpaid just becasue they have the 'right ticket', when they make the rest of the crew's life unbearable with they dirty clothes and obnoxious behavior!! The Chef is another highly paid person, with qualifications, that can have their moments as well....!!! And dont get me started on the Captain's!!! -Bottom line is, everyone thinks their job is more important, as we dont fully understand what everybody else is doing in the Engine Room, in the Galley, on Deck and in the Interior...

As far as I'm concerned, the GOOD Chief Engineer's, First Offtcer's, Chef's and Chief Stew's all deserve the high wages they get....

A sign of a great Chief Stew is that the yacht runs so smoothly, you dont even realise it, until she's not there anymore!

Because we are dealing with people (crew & guests) ,all day every day, it gets a little much after a 10 years, no matter what you get paid! 

How can the industry keep or retain the expericenced Stew's for longer - that would be a good question to ask...???

 


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:17 AM
Here is another way to look at it. No Engines, No guest. No Navigators, no guests, no chef, no guests, No stew, the captain and engineers and deck crew serve the food, do the laundry , clean the toilets and make the beds. Only one perspective before you rip me a new one.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:38 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


"Just because a member of crew is qualified, does this in turn mean, that they can be as lazy as they wish and hide behind their certification?"____________________________________ Keep up with me one day... I'll let you follow me around, then ask you to make the decisions and judgement calls as people ask me this and that. Then we'll go on a sea trial as I did yesterday with the wind blowing 20 kts diagonally onto and into the dock and I'll let you have the controls and lets see if you can keep from breaking things. Then I'll let you figure out the reasons behind the mechanical issues and arrange the next set of tests and repairs (and they have to be worthwhile, because none of it is cheap, and if you're wrong and just chasing things and spending money with no results, you won't long be in this position). Then you can write a concise report detailing and explaining it all to the owner in such a fashion that he understands what is going on. Captain is like any other higher level management position, the pay is not for what I do, but for what I know, and know how to do. I have to know every job on the boat, and I do. There are times I will cook a full meal for all the guests because the chef is sick or just plain worn out and I've sent them to bed. There are times when I'll sit there with the sponge and ammonia dabbing the red wine spills out of the carpet because the stew is swamped with washing linens and taking care of demanding guests. Since I'm often up in the middle of the night checking on things, I'll even take care of a guests late night issues rather than let the stew be awakened 2 hrs after getting to sleep after an 18 hr day. I'll also handle various repairs for the engineer, if I see some marks or rust on a piece of stainless, I'll grab some Flitz and polish it, no worries. I'm even seen with my iPod on and a buffer in my hand. I miss the days when I could just hang out polishing things outside. Nothing nicer than getting out there on a beautiful day and doing a wash down. These days though, I'm responsible to see to so much getting done, parts ordered, class requirements met, fueling scheduled, visas arranged, provisioning needs met.... that I rarely get to enjoy that kind of thing, especially right now at the end stages of a refit/commissioning trying to get problems solved and underway and I have 30 contractors to supervise and advise and make sure they are doing things properly and their billing is reflective of what is being done and educating the owner. You can call me arrogant if you like, I'll wear that to an extent, every captain does or they wouldn't take the job. There is always a certain level of arrogance required for a command position because without it, indecision sets in, and that never leads to a good result. The responsibility of everyones safety is mine, therefor I want people to act as I direct them to in that behest, so if I seem arrogant for telling you that I want something done a certain way, so be it. If you fail to do so and someone gets injured because of it, I'm the one who is at fault. So, once you figure out how to keep everybody safe, you now need to figure out how to communicate your wishes to everybody taking into account everyones little personal quirks and the method of communications you have to use to get them to follow the directions and even more importantly, teach them how to consider various things and come to proper conclusions on their own, because hey, that's another facet of my job, training people up. The biggest part of training people upwards is not in teaching them the technicalities, but rather in teaching them how to think and all the different factors that need to be considered in all the decisions. No matter how small the problem, each has at least 9 ways to solve it, and each way will effect other things, and which things can and cannot be adversely effected at any given time may be different because circumstances change. So, next time you walk into my cabin, and I'm leaning back in my chair or laying on my bed, don't assume I'm being lazy, because I work with my brain and it may be riding a tight rope on a unicycle over a crowd of people while juggling running chainsaws.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 10:33 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


As for___________________________________________________________" I'm sorry I guess I must have misinterpreted the original post. See, I thought he said that in order for a girl to progress as a stewardess she had to spend one night with a captain (who is obviously a man - this goes without saying)...... or sorry was it three nights? I get mixed up, you know, because I'm a girl!!!"________________________________________________ Well, that shows where you did indeed have a reading comprehension problem because what he said was,___________"Chief stew......one night with a captain and two years in a bad restaurant.________ which implies getting the job, not progressing. Now, he is incorrect, but by virtue of that, it does not make your position correct either. You are both incorrect and ill suited for working on a vessel as part of its crew because neither of you comprehends that everyone is important and required for the vessel to operate safely and efficiently, nor do you have the personality traits required for keeping a boat a fun and friendly place to live and work. When there is animosity on a vessel among the crew, then no one is having fun including the guests. These are the issues that drive good owners out of yachting and keep you from getting charter references. The issue is not one of being a girl or boy, but of having a poor attitude and the inability to express yourself properly and in a positive and productive manner. You have no respect for others thoughts and point of view. This is not a gender specific trait, however you try to take that tack because it is snide and requires less thought and effort. If you wish to advance in any field, may I suggest you give a bit more thought to what you read and hear, and your responses thereto. BTW, I have trained girls green to boats all the way to their licenses, I don't work on any bias except intelligence and attitude. If you come to me and want to learn and are willing to do your regular job, study and take instruction in your free time rather than go to the bar, I'll give all the instruction you can desire. The majority of crew (male or female) aren't willing to put in that effort. BTW, what license did you earn that you are working as mate on? If you've never had it so easy as now being a mate, you must be slacking, because mate is where you learn to be captain, and that requires an effort.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 12:00 PM
I am in the industry for 5 years. I am from hospitaly school and work in 5 stars restaurant and hotel. I also did corporate tour and travel sale for same type of hotel. We are soldiers with white gloves and nothing shall escape us. I know all the varietals and wine regions. I worked in finance and nothing escapes me in the kitchen. When we're at sea and I'm on duty and I will do my run in the engine room. I'm on the bridge to give assistance. I do not sleep with the crew because I'm here for work and if I will builds good relationships with people, well I have done my job. The problem here is clear. Because some captains, first officers have personal conflicts with the female officer. It's not often people no respect for their mothers, their wives have imagined a female member. Good manners are not taught in school books, but with our parents and our environment. Please note that we wash and ironing and repair clothing. You sit down to meals worthy and we rarely receive compliments while wages we do not steal. We care and take note of your food tastes. We make the purchases. Well fortunately there are engineers and captains who have good judgments and good manners who wish to work in harmony and for the benefit of all crew members. And for those who want to manage salary budgets I think he should think about changing careers.
yachtone
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 12:53 PM
Joined: 27/07/2008
Posts: 96


Dear John, you make the common mistake of confusing the ability to do a job with the ability to memorise text and pass a written or multiple choice test. The first response explains why a chief stew can be worth as much or more than the other department heads on board. If you have worked in this industry long enough to become a Capt. you should know that, I assume you are coming from the fishing or cargo trade. After you have done a season of back to back charters with a GOOD chief stew you will know better. The question we should be asking is " what can we do to keep good stews in the industry" not why do we pay them a decent salary.

yachtone
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:02 PM
Joined: 27/07/2008
Posts: 96


John, just re-read your post, and realise where you are going wrong. Change your recruiting technique, if they are silly enough to sleep with you they wont be clever enough to do the job, if they are clever then obviously they will take all the short cuts to avoid actual work.

junior
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:11 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


Concerning Rachael,s " what can be done to keep Stewardess's in the industry " I'm not sure if there is much that can be done to keep stewardess's or any crew in the industry for longer periods. Particularly with stewardess, the older they get the more complicated their lives become. Family and kids are the obvious complication.. Money, time off, perks cant solve this problem. In Yachting mobility and your freedom to move are critical. As far Hennings observation... "There is always a certain level of arrogance required for a command position because without it, indecision sets in, and that never leads to a good result ". Many times arrogance works best. Its not in my nature to be "know it all " and arrogant, giving orders to crew. Id prefer to have a little meeting, outline the project then ask the crew .....any ideas ? It all depends on the maturity and nature of the crew you deal with. Sometimes it works great, crew gets to thinking, throwing out a new approach, everyone gets smarter and all works better than your originall plan. Sometimes you come off looking like a captain who doesn't know what to do . I'm thinking of a few years back doing a very short delivery as a stand in captain. The yacht was lying inside the locks in Den Helder and had to be moved into the Ijsselmeer via the Kornwerderzand lock. This was a maximum draft yacht and the only way to get over the shallow hump on the north side of Kornwederzand is to cross at the top of the flood tide. I made my little passage plan, cheerfully departed Den Helder and began the trip. As is always the case with these things, visibility became restricted so I backed down on the speed. About half way into the 25 mile trip, eyes glued to the radar screen, I'm starting to get nervous about ETA because of this departure from passage plan, turned to the yachts mate and said... Do you think we are going to make it ? The mate fires back this wise ass retort...Whats the matter, cant you read the tide tables ! We made the passage without fuss, I never spoke another word to that wise ass mate, simply ordered him to do things. Its the million dollar question..., do you act arrogant and order crew around like robots or encourage them to think and get on with it ?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:27 PM

Response to “Simple” Question (how aptly titled!)

Your posting is so overtly inflammatory and sexist, I had to read it twice to undertand whether  it was serious or a complete joke. Given the extremely poor syntax and spelling, perhaps you are the one that needs a university degree or at least a course in English expression and/or communication skills?  And before you ask or point the finger, no, my first language is not English but one has to have a minimum level of education to work in yachting, no? Isn’t that your beef?

 

I won’t even deign to formulate a rebuttal to your pathetic bleat. Suffice to say that if you run your yacht in the same overbearing way that you write, I pity your crew, Captain Bligh.   

 

PS By the way, how much are YOU overpaid, may I ask???


Henning
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 2:24 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


How to keep a good chief stew (or any stew or good crew for that matter) in the business. That's really tough. As Junior pointed out, the biggest complication is the maternal desire. There are only a very few situations I have seen that are conducive to women having a family and serving as crew on a yacht, mostly they are local family yachts used mostly as a floating condo "weekend house on the coast", where the Capt Stew team have been with the owners for a considerable term and are treated as family. The child either coming along, or staying with grandparents when the boat goes on one of its few weekend or week long cruises. Obviously, these situations are rare as hens teeth. The other issue is job satisfaction. Most people want to advance and progress. Once you've been chief stew for a few years, where are you going to go? It's a tiring wearing job if you're doing it correctly even if you're very good at it. On a smaller boat, I can put them on deck and bring them in the wheelhouse some if they so desire, and usually they do. Larger yachts don't really offer that much flexibility as the chief stews job is very consuming and s/he doesn't really have the time available. Even without the maternal factor, there is the desire to have a personal relationship. This is a problem regardless of gender. There is always the dilemma of getting involved with someone you work with. Some vessels have rules against it, and some people want to keep a distinct separation between working and personal relationships. In these situations people (male and female) leave the industry because the reality is, even though you are on a multi million dollar boat surrounded by luxury and in some of the nicest places in the world, you are still a seaman, and a seaman's life is a lonely one. The reason I left the commercial sector and took a drastic cut in pay was because the yachting industry is one where you can be a "team" and work at sea while living with your partner....if you can find one. This is not without its own issues and sometimes the working "team" breaks up to save the personal relationship. It really isn't an easy life, that's why it's hard to keep good stews or any other crew for that matter even when they are well paid and have a pleasant working environment. It takes a lot of personal sacrifice and mental will to do it, and eventually, most people get tired of making the effort.
junior
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:23 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


By the way, nearly every stewardess replying on this thread spoke in a hard done by, venomous tone. Shame on you. Not one of you stewardess's answered the question. A stewardess is simply another crew. Its true that stewardess's don't need any formal qualification, but this does not imply that they are under qualified. A stewardess wont even get near this yacht unless she is educated, multi lingual, socially aware, hard working, well presented and responsible . To attract this type of person, who can easily interact with guests and be self sufficient ashore, you must pay a fair salary. I always prefer to source crew locally and In my area of operation the cost of living is high. As a result the stewardess, whom is assumed to be paying rent or a mortgage, operating a car and doing whatever responsible educated people do, will be paid up to 5000 dollars or euro equivalent. This may sound high but I have never heard the owner complain, he also lives in the local economy. As far as crew who by law are forced to follow licensing protocol and work in the industry at a very similar living wage to the stewardess...who cares, take pride in your qualifications and get on with your job..
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 6:06 PM
Hello I am the anonymous academic qualifications and want to say a final word.There are people who talk too much and other who do their work. The most important thing that girls or guys that make this work knows there is a person responsible and is the chief stewardess. The captain has the authority and it must be able to choose the boss inside. I had this experience on a yacht 150 feet. The two stewardess had been hired by Captain... alcoholic. The two young women believed that the reserve wines and alcohol were theirs. The young first mate was engaged but foolling around all night long with headless young stew. I could not dismiss these girls because the first officer had authority over the master... alcoolic. I resigned and I know they do so much rotation and never kept one chief stewardess more than 3 months... today that captain is no longer employed. Trust me there is tonnes of story like this.. Moral of this story. Let us do our jobs and be serious and respectful and keep your hands on your board and one your engine. For those who do not behave properly it will take at their own game. That's it That's all and please be proud of your jobs girls.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2009 7:14 PM
Not there when you need them, there when you don't. A reality check: a highly paid servant; that IS all you are. The time will come when you realise this and unfortunately that is when some of you will leave. For the dedicated it will be a profession, for the others a means to an end. In future there will be serious stew teams entering the temp world. Please don't say freelance, I know it has a romantic connotation and sounds clever but your not the photographer you wished you were. Your job in general is autonomous and can be done anywhere on any similar vessel with a little variation.
Great...that's just great.
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 12:43 AM
Joined: 25/08/2009
Posts: 8


To the poster above this post,

Look, mayne,  I'm sorry you've had issues with drama queen stews, but please don't ever trivialize a stew's role. Being a stew, starting out, freelance, or full time for years is NOT an easy job. I'm not even going to point out why, if I have to spell it out for anyone, obviously they're too clueless and should not be hired themselves.

 


John
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 2:21 AM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 78


Hello everyone. I am John, I posed the original question. I will re ask my question written in another way. I will attempt to write politically correct and try not to offend anyone. Before I begin, I want to apologize for my lewd comments. I wrote the original post hastily and frustrated. It was no more than a rant. First, a little background into why I asked the original question. I am looking for a good Chief stew, one who can aptly manage her department so I don't have to. All I get from the agencies are CV's from Stews claiming to be Chief but posses little to no experience. I know the agencies will try to push people on you, but I want quality. For that I WILL pay top Dollar. I will not pay for someone who has a year experience spread over two years three months at a time. I certainly won't entertain the request for 6000 Euros for a 52 meter yacht not cruising the med. MY QUESTION IS.....HOW CAN MOST STEWS JUSTIFY SUCH A LARGE SALARY REQUEST WITH NOTHING TO BACK IT UP. This question is not posed to those extremely well qualified and experienced Chief Stews out there, (and I know you exist) I just want to find one of you. For the record, I have never ever even contemplated fooling around with a crew member. It is strictly forbidden on my boats. Cheers PS Thanks Henning for your quality input. Hopefully no one will moderate the rest of this thread. haha !
saafrican
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 2:46 AM
Joined: 05/09/2009
Posts: 10


All this bickering , about other crew . I and the engineer on a charter boat , that has just completed a successful Med Season . I think that stews have the hardest position on a charter boat. On our boat they have long hours , their days start early and end late . If they aren't in front of the guests ,they are making beds ,or setting tables. if there is a gap then they are doing laundry ,until early hours of morning . I would not be a stew , sure they dont need tickets etc ,but they do work damm hard. Im not going to comment about engineers vs captains vs any one else . We have our own problems , but at the end of the day ,the stews deserve better pay ,
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 4:13 AM
Should unskilled laborers make more than Educated professionals. Should a hardworking factory worker make more than a small town doctor. Should a fisherman make more than their captain. Should a stoker make more than the Chief ???? All John wants is justification and he isn't getting any. Lots of people work hard, should they deserve equal pay to someone who worked hard in school. Do we attach the price tag on responsibility, hours worked, intelligence, What. What is societies protocal. I want more than...because we work hard. Everyone on the boats work hard. Hard sometimes takes a different form, but nevertheless is still hard work.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 7:11 AM
Arrogance is not a positive leadership quality in any situation. People do not respect that personality flaw in the least. In its highest form, it has lead to loss of life, especially in industries involving transportation. In combat situations, death is a high probability because the officer in charge will not take advice from battle hardened "subordinants".

Some of the finest Captains I have ever worked with were the least arrogant and also had unlimited ratings...they had nothing to prove at all. They all had things in common; they lead by example, mentored their crew, and actually listened to suggestions with an open mind. True leaders have realized that without a great crew, they cannot do their job properly.

Bottom line...the arrogance I experienced from yacht captains made me choose to leave the industry for greener pastures. Also, because I am a 50 year old chef, I realize that my chances of being hired are nil.

yachtone
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 3:28 PM
Joined: 27/07/2008
Posts: 96


John, I understand completely your frustration, if only you had made it clear that you were talking about aspiring chief stews we would have been kinder to you, but then maybe we would not have had such a good debate. It is a big problem, the attitude & demands of new or near new crew who don't even know enough to know that there is stuff they don't know. The question is not "how can we attract more crew to the industry" it is " how can we keep experienced crew in the industry", as Henning & Junior have pointed out the desire to have a normal life as part of a family is a severe impediment, but also, long hours, lack of privacy & cramped accommodations are factors. With yachts now being operational year-round I foresee that we will inevitably follow the merchant fleet into rotation for all positions and we will have to moderate our pay demands accordingly.

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2009 5:20 PM

Ah, God bless ya mate ! Well said.

And I don't even like Safricans. kidding


Crew Confessor
Posted: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 8:01 PM
Joined: 20/11/2008
Posts: 94


Dear Resentful,

Things are worth what someone will pay for it.  This old adage is also true when it comes to people.  The stewardesses on many yachts are the crew who interact most directly with the guests on board, and thus it is essential that a busy yacht have the best and most capable stewards/stewardesses who can be hired.  Supply and demand, the tenets of basic economics certainly apply here, as the very best are short in number, often commanding a salary that rivals many of the so-called "skilled" professions on board.  They are the face of the yacht and, along with a good chef they can make or break a charter.  

Now, I am not disputing the value of the engineer(s) who keeps everything running smoothly,  the captain who drives the bus, or the mate who taught Binky how to snorkel.  Many yacht owners demand that their interior staff be fluent in several languages and to have graduated from a proper university.  Today's owner and charter guests are much more sophisticated than their predecessors expecting  things such as elaborate theme parties and ever more creative table settings as a matter of course.  Often they fill multi-roles on board functioning as administrative assistants, accountants, computer techs,  social directors, bartenders, sous chefs, crew cooks, laundresses, seamstresses, dive instructors and massage therapists.  They must be mature enough to keep their thoughts to themselves and they must carry on with their duties when they are dead on their feet, and do it with a smile.  They must know when to make themselves invisible.  If they are on a sailing yacht they'll need to help sail the boat and even on a motor yacht you'll see them on deck hauling fenders and helping to dock the boat.  A great stew has an innate sixth sense about his/her guests, and is able to anticipate their needs seamlessly and without any fanfare.

A good stew is worth a generous salary, a great stew is worth their weight in gold.

Your Crew Confessor

 
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