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Change of career much?
kenny tran
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 7:15 AM
Joined: 26/09/2012
Posts: 3


Hi engineers,
I am a 24 years old engineer living New Zealand with a qualification in aircraft engineering. I've recently decided to pursue a career  in the super yacht industry. According to New Zealand Maritime I can get my MEC3 ticket with my formal aircraft engineering qualification and minimum 6months sea-time watchkeeping experience. sea-time experience can be on a merchant vessel or super yacht. My questions is what are the step I can do from here to secure a place in the industry? should I go through commercial route or superyacht route to get my sea time experience. Much wisdom is apreciated


Kenny

junior
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:44 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


Yachts are frivolous toys for rich boys. When the fat cats get tired of their toys or their investment bank collapses , they get rid of the toys ..AND YOU. On yachts the successful, going to retire someday, crew are those who can keep one foot commercial and one foot yachting. As an engineer you are best advised to make connections and be qualified for both industries. Yachts are a difficult way to generate a pension.
MikeEng
Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 11:22 PM
Joined: 17/09/2011
Posts: 2


Do you need your sea time or do you already have it? If you get your MEC3 then you can choose which path you want to follow. you will be qualified for both industries but you will have to choose the most favourable for you. But the first hurdle will be the sea time if you dont already have it. It doesn't matter which industry the time is in as long as the propulsion is >750Kw. Whichever is easiest for you. There are plenty of yachts out there. If you want to work on yachts though, do your time on yachts!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:05 AM
Hi Kenny, Between Junior's negativity and MikeEng's failure to read the question, you really didn't get an answer did you! But don't expect one from me either! ;-p What I would say is that as yachting is the career you've chosen to pursue, from a Y1/MN2 chief engineer's perspective, I would (and have) employed the person that has actually gained their seamiles on white-boats. Simply for the fact that they've seen the standards expected onboard and the equipment that you will be expected to maintain. There's not many slow speed diesels in yachting. Whilst initially you may have to accept a deck/Eng role on a smaller vessel to get your miles, they will be far more relevant in the long run. Also, the tool control/cleanliness inherent in Aircraft maintenance is far closer to yachting values than merchant ones and should make for an easier transition. If you have the opportunity to sit the Merchant ticket as well as your Y then sure, ultimately it's more strings to your bow. However, I for one would never go commercial after working on yachts, yet I have my class 2. Finally, contrary to what Junior might say, our industry is showing no signs of decline, good qualified engineers need never be out of a job and as regards pensions, if you can't save/invest enough for your future from a Chief Engineer's pay then you're having waaaaay too much fun! Hope this helps in some way. Justin.
RedGreenBlue
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:38 AM
Joined: 02/03/2011
Posts: 11


Hi Kenny, I think the experience on a merchant boat would prepare you better for the MEC3 course. You get to use boilers and some other systems that you are less likely to find on a yacht. This also makes completing your training record book easier. have you spoken to the director of the course? 1 thing i know they will say is that often yachts are not good for getting "actual" seatime. It's taken me nearly 2 years to get 6 months at sea.
MikeEng
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 3:37 AM
Joined: 17/09/2011
Posts: 2


Ok,to "the question", i knew that because it ended with ? not ! anyway. Get your sea time on a yacht over 750Kw (that is a requirement for any III/1 ticket) Do your MEC3 in NZ, its about 5 months duration broken up into modules. You are taught everything you need to know. I suggest when it comes to the Oral you make sure you know everything you need to about boilers because every yacht guy "I" know (4) including me got that as our first question. Once that is done, go and find a job, once you get some bucks saved, continue on either the yacht or merchant quals whichever you decide by that time you will have been around enough to know what "you" want to do. Like Justin said there are plenty of jobs around. Where in NZ are you?
Graeme
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 9:30 AM
Joined: 11/10/2010
Posts: 4





kenny tran
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 12:36 AM
Joined: 26/09/2012
Posts: 3


Thank you all for your input. The process seem to be very straight forward. The problem I'm having right now is getting my sea time. At this stage I'm willing to take any opportunity that swing my way, commercial or yachting.

Commercial - It seem very hard to find a company that is willing to take you on, without offering either a cadetship (which by the way; are offered to UK and EU citizen only???) or a fully qualified engineer.

Yachting - Justin, from the employer's point of view, what are the minimum yachting qualification required before you will hire them? RYA Diesel Engine Maintenance? AEC? and would you prefer someone with a trade background from different industry or someone who stick to the yachting industry?

How did you guy started out?? How easy was it to find sea time??

P.s @MikeEng : I live in Auckland


RedGreenBlue
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2012 11:48 PM
Joined: 02/03/2011
Posts: 11


Hi Kenny, I feel your pain! It's a bit of a catch 22 situation. I was in a similar situation 2 years ago. I didn't want to invest in courses as I have a degree in mechanical engineering behind me and experience in design with a prominent superyacht builder. So it made litte sense to spend time doing courses that would be of little value once I was eligible to sit MEC3. This choice however meant that working on charter boats was not an option because you need a ticket for that. As for starting out I managed to get some semi-permanent yard work through my godfathers-friends-son! Long shot! But it worked out really well. In the end they kept me on and the boat and crew were fantastic. If you want to try and get your experience in yachting, I would advise you to come up with a good CV, cast your networking far and wide, register with recruitment agencies and meet them in person where possible. Some of them will have daywork for you too which is probably your best bet. Otherwise dockwalking... with the merchant side, have you talked to paul harper at the maritime school re getting on a merchant boat? otherwise maybe you could do the courses and exams, then get your sea time, then sit your oral and get you ticket? just a thought...