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Soon to be Chief
JaWo
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2012 3:35 PM
Joined: 25/03/2012
Posts: 4


Hello, I am about to take my first chief engineer position on a brand new 45m motor yacht. I have been 2nd for 4 years on 3 yachts before and I have done all the relevant training (Y3) but somehow it seems like a huge step. Can any of you more experienced colleagues give me some advice on how to start the right way? Any advice will be much appreciated.
Dean
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2012 5:27 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 70


Divide the machinery systems into basic groups, look at each system closely and write up simple check lists. Pre-start, start, running, shut down and so forth. Trace out systems and draw simplified schematics that help define each systems main components and the operation principals. As you write up the checklists and draw out system schematics you will quickly discover what parts of the boat you don't understand well. When your chief it is what you don't know that slows you down and causes you the most headaches. I always focus on the unknowns until they become knowns and this way your teaching yourself the boat and building confidence as you master the machinery systems. As you figure things out take time to teach another crew member what you have learnt, give them your check lists and schematics, then ask them to follow your steps and see if they have enough information to run up equipment and what kinds of information is needed to make things more clear. Be concise and regularly refine your check lists and schematics as you learn more and discover little tricks along the way.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2012 7:22 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Good advice from Dean, but only for beginners setting out to learn the vessel's systems; not for someone who claims 4 years experience as 2nd engineer and (supposedly) holding a Y3.......something fishy here....
junior
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2012 7:32 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


A chief engineer needs a budget. MONEY. You must be able to communicate effectively with management, owner, captain...or whoever controls the cash. MONEY ...COMMUNICATION...KNOWLEDGE equals chief engineer.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2012 7:38 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Captains impose budgets, Chief Engineers ignore them, and the budgets....
Captcct
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 9:30 PM
Joined: 27/03/2012
Posts: 6


[Deleted for violating forum guidelines.]

Captcct
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 9:39 PM
Joined: 27/03/2012
Posts: 6


[Deleted for violating forum guidelines.]

JaWo
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:07 AM
Joined: 25/03/2012
Posts: 4


Thank you Dean, I was more after the politics and communication. Totaly agree with Rusty Wrench, but what are the tricks? Do you have to convince everyone that their lifes are in jeoprady if I don`t get my stuff or do you keep talking about the upcoming regulations and the need of such and such changes or...? But I guess there is no universal answer and I will have to figure it out by myself. Thanks anyway.
Moleisk
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 5:10 AM
Joined: 24/03/2011
Posts: 4


As long as you do all your checks, keep a clean engine room, make sure you have all the spares you need and keep good records on all planned and unplanned work, the captain will not really bother you only if something is not working, keep a good eye on the guest and crew tender as the deck hands tends to always brake something, try to keep the chief stew happy as will try to make you life a living hell, have a clean tool bag and drop cloth ready, as for guests always make sure the aircon is working working, hope this helps good luck and congrats on your first chief engineers position.
Dave
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 5:37 AM
Joined: 30/06/2008
Posts: 3


Make sure you get a good handover with good records or all previous maintenance and issues problems outstanding. If you are not happy with the handover and records make sure you express this to the captain so it doesn't come back to bite you. If there is no planned maintenance routine in place copy the system from your old boat and adapt it to your new systems.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, March 29, 2012 10:55 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1061


Best to be straight forward with facts and options. Typically it's not too hard to get real engineering needs funded. If you come off spending money on doodads and forecasting dire predictions of what will happen without, well, you start losing respect. Remember, captains aren't all engineering idiots and for that matter, neither are all owners. "Budget building exercises" are another frowned upon tactic that department heads seem to get caught up in because it oh so often is an indicator of fraud and embezzling.