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Todays offered Salaries are a joke
Hayley.reading
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 7:11 PM
Joined: 31/07/2012
Posts: 3


Can anyone explain why I am scrolling through job board after job board and seeing the offered salaries the same or less than a junior stewardess position when I started in the industry almost 6yrs ago?!

How can agents/captains/owners be asking for 3-10yrs experience and culinary training and high end quality on a salary fit for a green stew on her first yacht?! 

What have I missed?


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 8:07 PM

In my opinion and experience, there are lots of owners who aren't okay spending the $ needed to properly own a yacht, but want one anyway.

This leads to brokers giving them bottom of the barrel numbers for the amount of crew needed and for pay.  (If new owners were given reality less boats woukd sell).

This leads to people being hired to just have a job because some money is better than no money.

Some of these programs never grow up, and continue to run with an unreasinably low budget. 

A good broker will shoot straight, and a good Capt. will help the owners understand that like most things in life you get what you pay for.

"If you think it is expensive to do it right, wait till you see how much the cheap way costs you." 

 

There are boats that pay fairly, just keep looking. 

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 8:13 PM
Hayley,  we are looking for someone with culinary training and experience.  How do I get in touch?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 8:38 PM
As an long distance yacht owner, Many crew are a "Joke". Captains who ask vendors for "kickbacks", only work 5-6 hours a day because no one is watching, are negligent causing ten of thousands of dollars in damage, blame others for their incompetence, steal money and then they want top pay. Act like Tyrants. Engineers who are licensed but are negligent in making sure they complete their tasks in a timely and complete manner. Fail to follow scheduled maintenance program. First Mates who talk a good story but then always want to hire day workers to keep the exterior clean, or party on the yacht when no one is around Chief stews who fail to keep the interior shining. Just because a person has years of experience, they need to show the right attitude and performance. Need to show you deserve the higher money. My NEW position is to offer lower starting salary with 30 day and 90 day performance reviews.
BillyD_1
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 8:43 PM
Joined: 16/09/2011
Posts: 6


I have had at least two brokers dress me down for telling a boat owner the truth about the costs of owning and operating a larger yacht. They want the sale and the commission, and will do or say anything to make it happen.

As for crewing a yacht, they want us to use the archaic pay scale of $1k per foot, regardless of our experience, this is a lot of controlled BS from the charter and sales brokers. If you have 10-20 years in yachting without any   recordable insurance claim, does that not say anything? Is that not worth anything? We all want to be appreciated for our hard work and long hours. How do we correct the issue? Stop taking the low paying positions, those who do, find out in short order that the money will run out and then they don't get payed at all!

My advise, follow the money, if they offer less, don't take it, know your own self worth and stick by it.

Just my two cents

Capt. BillyD


ecdj
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 8:56 PM
Joined: 09/10/2013
Posts: 1


Anonymous wrote:
Hayley,  we are looking for someone with culinary training and experience.  How do I get in touch?

Hey, Anonymous! I'm a professional chef with an extensive background in 5-star hospitality including luxury M/Y and S/Y throughout Europe, Caribbean & US. I'm fit & energetic, hard-working & extremely competent. I recently closed my SW FL restaurant, Pasture & Pearl (pastureandpearl.com) and I'm currently seeking free-lance opportunities. Immediate availability. Open to long-term commitment, also, for the right opportunity. Reach me at elaineskitchens@gmail.com
 


TRHull
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 9:18 PM
Joined: 11/08/2016
Posts: 1


Your Interview and aspirations in yachting are your responsibility.   

I will readily admit to being both a low ball hiring Captain for a client as well as paying top salaries, dependent on the operation and needs of the vessel and client.   All to often in the industry, I have fabulous resume's in front of me, with individuals who have "great" references, but yet are all fresh brooms.  "They work well for 6 weeks, but then you have to replace them, because they just refuse to give you 50% of what they came aboard with."   With many clients, I have been able to bring up a 90 day review for all new hires, then work on those numbers afterwards.  Sometimes this flies well, and sometimes it doesn't.   Training an owner of a yacht is about respect and knowing what they truly want out of their program.  Thats something that grows with a command, and is not a sure thing.  If a Captain offers something  that doesn't fit your needs, then move on.   If you can step into a lower paying position on a vessel with a caveat in the contract for a reasonable review and bump in pay, then you have to prove yourself.  Most of us out there, from the Junior Deckhands on up through Lead Masters working on their 30th plus year in the industry have to prove themselves every time they step on board.   A starting salary is nothing more than minimum wage to fill a spot with an unknown entity.  Negotiate, and prove you are worth more...  If they can't or won't pay the bump in salary or benefits, then the program might not be it for you.   If they can, then you know that your interview was far more than a flashy CV and a winning smile.   We sell ourselves every day of the week, weekends and time off included in yachting.   Being able to put the WOW in everyday gets you the salary or benefit you deserve.  And if it doesn't, somebody else will see the WOW and offer you the better option.


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 10:55 PM

We have had 5 chefs in the last two years, owner has only been on for 10 weeks, and the Chefs all start out great for the first week, then they settle in to the easy lifestyle of just cooking for the crew and the food goes down hill quickly. They get lazy and the crew are not even wanting to eat the food and end up going off the yacht for meals. Budget is not a problem as there is plenty of funds available.

We have had English, Australian, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese Chefs, I am in the industry for over twenty years and the quality of crew is deteriorating rapidly, the crew I have now, have been with me for over two years, the only problems we have are always the chefs???????


Hayley.reading
Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:25 PM
Joined: 31/07/2012
Posts: 3


ecdj wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Hayley,  we are looking for someone with culinary training and experience.  How do I get in touch?

Hey, Anonymous! I'm a professional chef with an extensive background in 5-star hospitality including luxury M/Y and S/Y throughout Europe, Caribbean & US. I'm fit & energetic, hard-working & extremely competent. I recently closed my SW FL restaurant, Pasture & Pearl (pastureandpearl.com) and I'm currently seeking free-lance opportunities. Immediate availability. Open to long-term commitment, also, for the right opportunity. Reach me at elaineskitchens@gmail.com
 

Hi Anonymous,
Please email me at hayley.reading@gmail.com

Hayley.reading
Posted: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 2:54 PM
Joined: 31/07/2012
Posts: 3


Thank you everyone for your thoughts and advice.

I have seen my fair share of boats, being a freelance chef for almost 6yrs now. I'd like to think I've seen it all when it comes to crew dynamics, owners, brokers and management, yet I am still constantly surprised.

I agree with you in that I think brokers and agencies are playing a role in the lower offered salaries probably more so now than ever before as BillyD and Anonymous mentioned. There seems to be a very unrealistic picture painted to owners these days to increase sales and commissions and cause this ripple effect to expenditure when it comes to crew and budgets. But the problem also is that too many crew are taking these positions on a salary far below that of industry standard, even though the request for qualifications and experience stay unchanged.

I also agree that crew aren't getting any better which I can put to two reasons; 

1. You get what you pay for. If you are offering sub par remuneration, your going to get sub par crew. Which then supports the claim that crew are unprofessional, unqualified and unwilling. Of course then leading to high turnover, resulting in a bad reputation for the yacht and the snowball continues. 

2. Bad Management. I believe this can be broken down into two parts. The amount of yachts I have been on and found that the Captain and therefore Management of the boat is at an embarrassing standard is far to high. Captains that either don't do their job well by means of poor performance or by that of being oblivious to crew dynamics and issues is astounding. I think we can agree that it needs to come from the top. Captains unaware of things going on within the crew cause problems of work ethic as a bad leader doesn't motivate you to be your best self as well as the flip side which is unaccountability of poor performance amongst crew being rectified.

The industry struggles between the balance of being professional and human. No other job in the world deals with the situations we live and work in and I think a lot more needs to be discussed in the initial interview process.

Hope everyone has a fantastic Holiday season.


AYC
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 2:20 PM
Joined: 26/06/2013
Posts: 15


Hi Hayley,

I think a few of the comments have nailed it, some Yacht Owners are seeking to get more for less HOWEVER on yachts that have good crew longevity we are observing the flip side of your argument. 
We have just posted a Junior Stew on a 58m M.Y. that has proven longevity among its crew and offers great bonuses and benefits, the starting salary is a 2,800 Euro for a junior stew so I think this proves that the wages on offer are still generous. 
Many of our jobs are based around the Asia Pacific region where there a perception that everything is cheaper, this is somewhat true however we've noticed that most owners are happy to pay for quality whether that relates to crew, services and or parts and equipment.