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Where do they all go?! is there enough jobs?
Corey Adcook
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 7:54 PM
Joined: 19/12/2009
Posts: 2


after deciding to stay in the industry I am in the UK doing my final OOW module. At the particular centre I am studying, they provide courses for all areas of the industry, apart from proper engineer stuff. Here this week alone there are probably 70-90 people. A course of at least 12 STCW basics, a load of cadets, some OOW’s and Masters and so on. Apparently it is the same here every week give or take over the winter period. My question is, where do all the newbies go, is there enough jobs. Because I don’t know of many people leaving working on the boats, compared to the amount I hear getting into the industry, plus those getting more qualified such as OOW and Master.
junior
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 9:01 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Good question ! And Who Knows ? Perhaps there are huge herds of undiscovered megayachts roaming the African plains ? I see whole marinas full of mothballed brokerage yachts and consider the actual fleet of active yachts to be rather small .
TREVOR
Posted: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 10:18 PM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 3


I often get friends and friends of friends asking me how they can go about getting into the industry. I usually tell them not to wast their time, but to rather find another industry to get into. I have been in the industry for 6 years and still struggle to find work - we dont need more green horns flooding the industry
Smith
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2012 12:31 AM
Joined: 28/07/2009
Posts: 10


There's plenty of work out there for enthusiastic, qualified crew with the right attitude. Speaking from experience, it is actually not that easy to find crew for any position with those three attributes and no baggage.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2012 7:51 AM
Absolutely there is a need for decent qualified people in the industry. But a lot of these training centres are qualifying people as high as possible, taking £15,000 off them for the pleasure, then saying great go get a job. Yet they haven’t even experienced the industry to know whether they will want to continue to work in it. The zero to hero centres should have more responsibilities.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2012 12:43 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1064


The problem is there is a serious disconnect between boats being able to find good crew and crew finding jobs, and that is for the most part the crew agent industry. They typically have no clue what it takes to make good crew; mostly because they were crappy crew, that's why they're ashore. They look at you appearance and who your drinking buddies are and what certificates you hold.

This entire industry has slipped in quality far from the world of Yachting a century ago or even 25 years ago. It used to be headed up by people who loved the sea, now it's headed up by a bunch of Bogans who just compete to display how much money they have and their stylistic sense.

Dean
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2012 6:18 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


Good jobs are hard to find, good people are hard to find and when things improve good people are hard to keep. Yachting needs new people, always has and always will. Stick with it, don't give up and something will come.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2012 8:39 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1064


Dean wrote:
Good jobs are hard to find, good people are hard to find and when things improve good people are hard to keep. Yachting needs new people, always has and always will. Stick with it, don't give up and something will come.


Yep, the problem is yachting is an industry filled with drifting backpackers in it for a quick experience. That's not altogether bad though because that is part of the basic personality requirement to make this stick. Thing is by experience of the maritime industry over a quarter century tells me only about 10% of people who will try will stay at sea for whatever of many various reasons.

So as a captain hiring I look at a larger picture. I look to see how bright you are, your basic personality traits and how I think you would fit with the existing crew. I also look for the various physical manifestations and covers for drug and alcohol abuse. Sad to say anymore I would expect them to have STCW95 done if they are coming to me; it would not be disqualifying for the right candidate though, I'll send them. I look at your level of general knowledge, disposition and carriage. Then I have to consider if I think you're gonna stay around long enough to make it worth my while to train you.

Whoever says "Go day working" gets the cookie. Day working works if you you work hard and smile. When I look at a day worker on the boat, those are the two things I'm looking for. Also get written references from the captain for day work even if you don't get a permanent berth. If you do a good job any captain worth working for will be happy to write you one him/herself. They are good chips to carry.

Corey Adcook
Posted: Saturday, March 3, 2012 9:08 AM
Joined: 19/12/2009
Posts: 2


Think Dockwalk and maybe some people here have the wrong idea about what I’m saying. My comments weren’t about my own situation. I am fairly confident to always get work, as I have been lucky enough to do so in my career up to this point. Luckily for me I’ve grown up in or on the water (not enough to call myself a mariner yet, will leave that to the Great white bearded men) but the harder I work, stay professional, get good references and push myself for further qualifications I seem to keep myself employable. Lucky hey….. My comments were more about all the new comers to the industry, especially the unqualified / backpacker types thinking it is just an extension of their gap year after Uni. There just aren’t enough boats being built quick enough to accommodate them let alone employe them. So the back packer types move on to something else having had to swallow €1000 loss on their stcw after not getting work. but the guys who have paid €15000 plus/minus for their zero to hero courses have to be made aware of the realities of not getting work on a big boat and maybe looking at other options. If it all goes wrong for me, I’m off to Costa Cruises for a job anyway
Peter John
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2012 12:59 PM
Joined: 05/03/2012
Posts: 1


Hi everyone!! Have you heard of "Absolute Crew"... It's a new recruitment agency being launched next week. I have been advised to use them because they have some good contacts. They have also lined me up with a fantastic job, really happy.
junior
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2012 1:50 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Well Corey...us great white bearded men have great sympathy for the new generation of yacht crew. The high cost of silly sea school paper is a barrier to entry, discouraging many of the very best young people from working on yachts. You may call these young people who come with little experience looking for a summer job on yachts BACKPACKERS, but I call them University Students. These University students have been my best summer crew for DECADES. Now I get a resume from a legal to work European University student, trilingual, Political Science major who has June July and August available for working the Mediterranean season and I must tell this poor student that they must sit for a GOOFY 1000 euro STCW course before they can come to push a vacuum and chat with my guests. Naturally they tell me NO WAY .. and do something else. This leaves me no choice but to hire low skill , poorly educated, Foreign crew with few career choices , who invested in STCW paper rather than a university education . I don't like this modern yachting world and am happy that my time left with yachts is short.
Flyr89
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 7:10 PM
Joined: 17/10/2011
Posts: 11


That´s why you should hire me, Business university degree, 4 languages, sailing background and dive instructor, currently hold all necessary certs
Henning
Posted: Thursday, March 29, 2012 10:22 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1064


Lol, you say University Student like it's means something. Until they actually have a degree all they have shown is they are still sucking of the tit to keep them alive. Until they have at least a masters degree they haven't shown they are an more capable of thinking than average.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 8:16 PM
Speaking of the 2013 season, a friend of mine is doing their STCW now in august in antibes and from the source of the school they have for the first time conducted 2 full courses in summer months. plenty of crew in the beginning of the season as we all know but it seems that there are spaces for at least half all the new crew... supposably somewhere in the world a yacht of >40m is built weekly thats 48 odd boats a year, and they dont sink they get older and hang around...... sustainable?