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Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan for Yachts
Adam O'Sullivan
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 3:26 PM
Joined: 01/10/2009
Posts: 6


Hi All, Has anyone had to complete a Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan. It seems to me that it in no way relates to us in the yachting world. I understand the reasons for this but was wondering if anyone else has had to deal with it yet. According to the new regs anyone over 400GRT should have the document in place from Jan 1st. Thanks and Happy new year Adam
junior
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 4:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


How much does your towed supertender increase your fuel burn ?
Adam O'Sullivan
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 5:52 PM
Joined: 01/10/2009
Posts: 6


We dont tow a tender of any description, although i guess you could include those sorts of operations.
junior
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 7:15 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


Other high energy use , waste areas are House services. Since yachts spend their lives at the dock , this should be an import area to investigate. Who knows what waste means .... but savings by keeping equipment like stabilizers r, Air con, Generators running to original specs must be worthwhile. Take a reading on your shorepower rate meter..and compare next month
Adam O'Sullivan
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 10:33 PM
Joined: 01/10/2009
Posts: 6


Thanks for your replys Junior but i think you may be off point here and making some huge generalisations. To start with not all yachts spend there lifes on the dock plugged in as you have suggested. There are many 2 season charter/private yachts who spend 200+ days at sea. Also im not sure of to many ports other than St Barths where yachts will run stabilisers in port. Many yachts such as ours have or would love a load bank to actually increase load during lower load periods. If there is anyone who has actually completed the SEEMP document or better yet has one that has been rolled out by a large management company i woulds very much like to hear from you.
International Yacht Bureau
Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 2:00 AM
Joined: 10/04/2010
Posts: 6


Hello Adam. At first glance the SEEMP may appear to be a hassle, but it very much does affect yachts. The in-force date was 01-Jan-13, but the actual SEEMP is not required to be on board until your first intermediate or renewal survey for your IOPP and IAPP certificates. It will coincide with a new survey for the International Energy Efficiency (IEE) Certificate. The SEEMP seeks to improve a yacht's energy efficiency through four steps: planning, implementation, monitoring, and self-evaluation and improvement. These components play a critical role in the continuous cycle to improve energy management. Achieving these goals can be done through a combination of structural and operational actions. Examples may include improved voyage planning, weather routing, optimized speed, consistent shaft power, enhanced use of rudder and heading control systems (autopilots), and hull maintenance. Our company acts as flag-state inspectors for 10 different flags. You can contact us by email. We'll be glad to point you in the right direction for how to comply. survey@yachtbureau.org
junior
Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 6:27 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1024


Well, 200 days on station means the rest of the year at the dock. Do you know how much energy you consume each day on station and at the dock ? The management plan is designed to educate crew to areas of possible energy conservation. Nothing wrong with that. Crew are unaware. Previously a Dockwalk contributor asked about upgrading his towed tender. None of the replies from his fellow yachties mentioned tender displacement or hull forms that reduce fuel burn under tow. This is obviously an area that needs improvement. Details like Correct fairings on the bow thruster tunnel , stabilizer fins and sea water intakes can reduce fuel burn by 5 percent. For house loads an efficient way to save energy while air conditioning , is to reduce the amount of exterior window surface. Large canvas sun deck overhangs and widow covers. Cooling demand can also be reduced by choosing an advantageous berth, or anchorage that keeps the sun off the side of the yacht Many ways.............
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 1:38 PM
Quoted from our Management Company provided SEEMP "SEEMP is not a onerous regulation. All ships are required to carry a SEEMP, but this is all that is necessary for compliance. It need only 'take account' of the relevant IMO Guidelines, and neither the Administration or port State control can check that the contents of the SEEMP adhere to these guidelines, or that a ship is implementing the measures contained in its SEEMP. Enforcement powers are limited to verifying that a SEEMP exists- and even here, it's continuing existence is not directly verified- the presence of SEEMP is attested by means of the IEE certificate, which is issued once for the life of the ship." Apologize for any typos. Sent from iPhone.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2013 9:07 AM
I think the SEEMP is a pretty good idea in the long run although it might seem like just another hassle. Forcing crews to think just a little more. Like how many yachts really need fully lit up when off charter and sitting at the dock? Like mentioned above are the stabilizers really always needed, a slight roll with just crew on is not the end of the world? I've seen some yachts where the engineering is focused solely on the entertainment side and often leaving the engine room stuff on the back burner. Well looked after engines are a lot more efficient. We've just put the SEEMP into place on board with the main aim being to take previous years running costs and reducing them one idea at a time. Just from discussing SEEMP we found that ballasting at anchor first instead of putting stabs straight on was a good way to reduce the roll on this boat.