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Covering Tattoos
Diane.b
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 10:11 AM
Joined: 20/12/2011
Posts: 8


Hey everyone, First time poster. I was wounding if anyone has any tips for covering up arm tattoos. I have one under each arm from my shoulder to just above my elbow. I know it's going to make life extremely difficult for me in terms of finding employment in the industry, but I am VERY determined to make this work. I have been looking at tattoo cover sleeves and tattoo cover make up. If anyone has any experience with covering tattoos can I please have some advice? Thank you so much in advance! Diane
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 10:48 PM
IMO, Dont go for a cover up. . I have Tatts from shoulder to wrists on both arms(not sleeves though) and managed to get hired on a high class boat that always refused to hire anyone with tattoo's. Been on here well over a year and only had about 10% of interviewer's tell me they would be an issue. If they want to hire you, they will make it work. trust me. I had the outlook going into yachting that it may take a while because of them, and it didnt. I got jobs just as fast, if not faster than others I know. Experience and work ethic will do it for you.
Diane.b
Posted: Thursday, December 22, 2011 12:02 AM
Joined: 20/12/2011
Posts: 8


Thank you so much for your reply. I'm a very hard worker and keen to prove myself. Hearing your opinion has made me a tad less worried about my tattoos. Hopefully interviewers feel the same way about me. Did you keep them covered during the interviews? And are they covered up by your uniform when you're working?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, December 22, 2011 6:32 AM
Well, During interviews I always wore a button up shirt anyways, and Yes, it covered them up. Be prepared to show them to an interviewer though. I have never lied about them, or purpously tried to hide them. If someone asks, tell them the truth. If they dont ask, Dont tell until it is necessary. I have found that it is much easier to go into an interview 1 on 1 with zero judgments, and let the person get to know you as a person/worker before opening up about the tattoo's. Of course, if they ask from the beginning, then this is not an option. Dont be concerned about them. As I said in my previous post, If you have what they want, and can prove you can work, Tattoo's do not matter To add about my uniforms, they are never completely covered up in my uniforms. Some are, most aren't, and the ones that are can be seen through a crisp white shirt, or a white rash vest. The guests have gotten used to it and do not mind anymore.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 10:52 AM
I know many boats that its a big no no for interior, not a problem for the deckies of Engineers. Whatever you do, do not write on your CV you have NO tattoos just leave it off. Good luck with the job search.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 10:10 PM
I have been surprised at how well my tattoo's have been welcomed, especially by my boss and I work interior on a large yacht. When I first joined the industry I was afraid but now I am not at all and I think if someone didn't take me on solely for that reason then that isn't the boat for me. My tattoo is on my upper arm and the bottom of it can be seen in my uniform but I told the Captain prior to accepting the job and he was fine mainly because he knew the boss well and knew he'd be ok with it. Good luck x
Diane.b
Posted: Saturday, December 24, 2011 9:50 AM
Joined: 20/12/2011
Posts: 8


I'd just like to thank everyone for their feedback on this issue. It has helped so much and has also taken away some of the anxiety I was feeling toward the situation. Have a Merry Christmas everyone, wherever you are!
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 5:28 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Diane.b wrote:
I'd just like to thank everyone for their feedback on this issue. It has helped so much and has also taken away some of the anxiety I was feeling toward the situation. Have a Merry Christmas everyone, wherever you are!

Yeah, owners are as diverse as crew; I know a billionaire owner with a full suit. Tattoos will restrict you from some jobs, but if you are the type of person who likes your ink, you probably won't be real happy with your overall quality of life on a boat that rejects you for them. It's not all about money, and this is a feast or famine industry so make sure the boat you join is going to be one you'll be happy on for at least a year. When you interview look around and see what the general mood aboard is. This can be an extremely miserable industry in the wrong situation and/or with the wrong people; deadly even. The level of professionalism in yachting is highly variable from the best to the worst I have ever seen, embarrassing even. Stopping the boat 15' off the fuel dock, throwing messenger lines and winching it in. All this in totally calm conditions with an obviously operating set of engines and thruster; I could not believe it. From what I heard, the guy I relieved on the last boat was even worse. Poor captains will ask you to do things that will get you hurt, don't do them. DO NOT JUMP to the dock in any questionable situation especially with boat motion towards the dock. If you see a collision coming Get Away! I can fix a boat way cheaper than I can fix you. Do not let me screwing up get you hurt; I should stop the boat right up alongside for you to step or hand off a line. Please don't try to save me for my failings and please don't throw a line until I call for it. I might need to bail out from a bad approach still. If you work with a captain who thinks any differently, leave at first opportunity and watch yourself carefully until then. A crew member is known as a 'Hand' because you only have one hand to give to the ship since you need the other to care for yourself; always look out for yourself first.

 
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