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Another South African looking for help
Neil
Posted: Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:25 AM
Joined: 13/09/2011
Posts: 4


Hi all, I've always had a keen interest in yachting and the superyachts, but was never quite sure how to get into the industry. I've done a lot of research and the plan at the moment is to do a course in Cape Town in Jan 2012. The course will include STCW, Competent Crew, Powerboat 2, Day Skippers and a small deckhand course (oh and VHF). I know this topic has been raised many times in the forum, but I just wanted to know what my chances would be as a newbie in 2012 (as opposed to others having asked about last year)? Does it get much harder as a newbie every year? Are South African's well-liked crew in Antibes? I'd like to fly over mid-March and start by staying in a crew house for a few weeks to get established and hopefully get a job in that time (by mid-April), and if not I'll move to a cheaper residence. Is this too early or is that a good idea? If there are any South African's reading this, a little advice on how you were able to establish yourselves (as newbie deckhands) would be much appreciated. My long term plan is to do a year or two of being a deckhand before doing my AEC, MEOL and then becoming an engineer (after further studying) Thanks in advance, Neil
s-holman
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 12:03 PM
Joined: 25/01/2010
Posts: 17


Howzit Bud I did all those courses in 09, unfortunately was a terrible year! All you really need is STCW and rib masters (powerboat II) Anyways Im planning on going back next year as well to palma or antibes we'll see..i'm prob not the best for advice but I've been over in a bad season so if you need to ask anything just give me a shout.
Neil
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 1:08 PM
Joined: 13/09/2011
Posts: 4


Hey thanks for the reply. What was so bad about the season in '09? Is there a big worry with South Africans trying to get seaman's books etc? Apparently it's become much harder for us in recent years and captains would much rather sign on with deckies from the UK/Aus/US/NZ because they don't require visas?
Captain Andy
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 4:48 PM
Joined: 17/09/2008
Posts: 93


Hi Neil! You can apply for an MCA Efficient Deck Hand (Yacht) once you have completed 6 months satisfactory service as a Deckhand onboard a yacht: alongwith with a few other things, like an ENG1. Look at the MCGA website for that information. If you can, try and complete the RYA Yachtmaster shore based and practical exams. This wll open many doors for you as you are a Master in your own right. However, if you have the opportunity complete the MCA AEC course. This will make you a more attractive candidate to employ as it means you are a qualified engineer (but not STCW compliant!) but can easily be dual hatted to work on Deck or assist with basic tasks in the Engine Room. This is what I look for when I employ Junior Deckhands!
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 6:18 PM
Neil, Hopefully, you grew up around boats and have a true 'passion' for the water and know how to respect it . Recently, our industry has suffered deaths by some crew members who don't actually understand the bascics such as how to properly drive a tender . This industry has no room for inexperience . Please don't think that you can spend a couple thousand dollars in a classroom and be instantly 'qualified' . I don't mean to sound like a pessimist, but most Captains can agree with me that we need to filter out the 'back packing' adventure seeking' young people who want to enter our industry . Since you have taken the time and concern to post here, i'm sure you will do good ! Also, just a thought : When you interview on an American based boat with an American captain, bring your resume . .... if not, bring your CV .
Neil
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 6:31 PM
Joined: 13/09/2011
Posts: 4


Thanks for the replies. I understand your comment 'anonymous', and am not looking for just a holiday. I am really passionate about making a career out of this. I had applied (and was accepted) to mechanical engineering next year and have always enjoyed working with engines. I kind of sound like I'm selling myself, which I'm not trying to do. I'd love to do the AEC course as well, but might not be able to make enough to do it. I'm already selling my car as it is. Thanks for your advice though Captain Andy. I will look in to those courses and attempt to do them in future.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2011 5:12 PM
I assume you know about the necessity for a visa going to Antibes. You asked about whether South Africans are well liked in Antibes. Now, this has nothing to do with you personally, but I really regret to tell you that South Africans in general have gotten a bad name in yachting, getting worse over time. I couldn't count the number of crew I've run into, of no particular citizenships, who will not work with or for South Africans anymore. Others are going to tell you I'm full of it and try to blow sunshine up your bum, but as bad as this sounds, I promise you it's true. This post will get deleted by the web sensors anyway for being too inflammatory, so unfortunately you may have to go to Antibes to find out for yourself.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2011 2:34 AM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


ZA's yachties are a visa nightmare
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2011 11:18 AM
im a safa and have a 1yr visa, returning home in dec and hoping for a 2 yr visa this time round as i know some safa's have recieved. the steriotype with sfa's and visa's is a shame. safa's with no jobs etc comming over to the med have a 90 dya visa. where as some1 like myself who applied for a visa with a job in hand can get up to a 2 yr visa. next time you see a safa's cv when you looking to hire, just look at their visa before completely disregarding them as potential crew.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2011 5:54 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


A travel entry visa, regardless of the period of validity, is not a work permit and does not guarantee entry to the intended country.


 
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