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Raw Food Certification - Helpful in Yachting????
Mich
Posted: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 11:34 PM
Joined: 16/03/2009
Posts: 6


To all the yacht chefs out there- Thinking of getting certified in Raw Food, but concerned if this is really worth it in the yachting industry. I know that there are many owners out there now who are concerned with their health and therefore it may be looked upon as a valuable certification, but overall, what do you really think????
amira
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 3:13 AM
Joined: 28/06/2010
Posts: 17


Hi Anon;

Yes, many clients are eating healthy and looking for varied options but that being said, I think that a certification for raw food prep is redundant for a qualified cook. Any professional cook who went to cooking or had proper on-the-job training would know how to handle raw foods ranging from fresh produce to raw meats and seafood. Personally, I wouldn't waste my time on a raw food certification. I've been in the business for most of my adult life so food handling for me is second nature.

If you have been to cooking school or if you've worked with qualified cooks and chefs then I would advise you to skip the course. If you're completely green and have not been to either cooking school or worked in the food service industry then it may help but in that case, I think the yachting industry may not be the best place to start a brand new cooking career.

Best of luck

Amira

celine Colella
Posted: Saturday, April 16, 2011 10:24 PM
Joined: 22/03/2011
Posts: 1


Hello, are you referring to raw food as "the practice of consuming uncooked, unprocessed, and often organic foods as a large percentage of the diet". If that is the case, I have been wondering the same thing. I worked for 3 years for a family who had a vegan and an occasional vegetarian. The new family I am working for has several food allergies which lead me to cook a lot a vegetarian meals. I have experimented with raw food for a while and I think it can be integrated in the diet, but it is still to avant guard for it to be a sought after culinary skill and I do not think that a certification in it (not sure where you were thinking of getting it) would be a grate advantage. Now, if you are talking about a raw food handling class, than I don't think a certification in that is helpful either. Ciao!
ck41595
Posted: Sunday, April 17, 2011 3:42 AM
Joined: 24/05/2008
Posts: 2


Hello again Mich! It's great to be able to prepare a wide variety of food and awesome that you're educating yourself to the point of being able to seek out advice on specific techniques. Charlie Trotter and Roxanne Klein did a great book on the ins and outs of raw food. It'll give you insight into what is required for this very particular type of food prep, i.e. specific temperatures that qualify as "raw", techniques and recipes. As with all of Trotter's books, it's very visual and very detailed. I highly recommend it to broaden your repertoire, especially if you're in charter side of the biz. As far as a specialized certification, just depends on what grabs your attention as a cook and how far you want to run with the knowledge. Best of luck!!!
 
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