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Somali pirates hijack American yacht
Robert
Posted: Monday, February 21, 2011 10:09 AM
Joined: 09/06/2008
Posts: 3


NATO Operation Ocean Shield today said that at 13:23 UTC February 18, a yacht was reported hijacked by pirates in position 18°00 N 061°02 E. The BBC quotes Ecoterra International as identifying the yacht as the S/V Quest, owned by an American retired couple, ( http://www.svquest.com/) and saying that it was hijacked 240 nautical miles off Oman en route from India to Oman. Jean and Scott Adam, the yacht's owners, have been sailing it around the world since 2002, according to their website. The couple wrote on the site that they had taken on two new crew members last year. Somalia's UN mission confirmed for the Associated Press news agency in New York that the S/V Quest had been hijacked. ABC News report U.S. officials as confirming that the yacht has been seized by pirates, but saying that it is unclear how many Americans may have been aboard have been aboard at the time the boat was seized. One U.S. official said there were two males and two females aboard the vessel at the time that it was seized. Source: www.maasmondmaritime.com / www.MarineLog.com
An Owner
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 3:09 PM
Joined: 15/01/2009
Posts: 53


Sadly,

DEVELOPING STORY: Four Americans aboard a yacht hijacked by Somali pirates have been killed, Fox News has confirmed.

U.S. forces responded to gunfire aboard the yacht Quest at approximately 1 a.m. Tuesday, but discovered all four hostages had been shot by their captors. Despite steps to provide life-saving care, all four hostages died of their wounds.



Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:19 PM
THATS it MAKE ALL COMMERCIAL SHIPS CARRY WEAPONS TRAINED PERSONNEL and SHOOT TO kILL ORDERS for ANY BOAT APPROACHING WITHOUT GOOD REASON........stop this pandering
Capt Edward P
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:27 PM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


Some years ago at Refit in Antibes, 2002 I remember seeing a white noise machine on a tripod,which one stood behind, and aimed the speakers at the approaching boat. Anyone seen this still,?? It was expensive back in 2002 but maybe now worth it. Ed (hideousfrance.com)
Gilana
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:43 PM
Joined: 07/10/2010
Posts: 15


Very sad. While we will neither confirm or deny if we have weapons on board I must comment thus...
I suspect that the inquiry might find out what happened by interrogating the remaining pirates now in captivity. The problem with carrying arms is not just one of a legal and moral nature, it is also a strategic question. Imagine if four hostages outnumbered at least 3:1 by pirates, did in fact have arms on board. Their entire strategy might be influenced by this, where a decision could be made to engage the pirates, instead of complying and getting out alive. If that engagement is, however heroically undertaken, a failure, there is the certainty of death. Even if the arms were hidden, one might be tempted to play this dangerous card. IF this card  is indeed played, the situation must be 100% in your favor, you would have to have combat experience, not gleaned in video games, but under fire from a willing and capable enemy. You would have to be trained, assess your enemy, know him, exploit his weak points, his routine, split them up, sew dissent, and many more circumstantial and strategic questions.  Finally you have to understand that this is an irrevocable commitment to escalate the situation into a fatal consequence. For those of us who voyage for a living or pleasure, it would be hard to equal or exceed the abilities and motivation of the pirates who spend their entire lives practicing this, while we think about it maybe 10 minutes a week. Remember Peter Blake? More problems are caused by guns than solved by them.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:16 PM
With a 12 gauge shot gun you don't own a gun you command an area-told to me by a master sargent in the 82nd... and by experience I know it's true. They might break down the door but that is as far as they will get on this yacht. I mourn the victims of this tragedy. I still have had more problems with "pirates" in the States and would not be here if I had not had a weapon to warn off a robber intent on breaking down my door at a Marina in the Keys.... When minutes count the cops are hours away.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:24 PM
Blimey - did you shoot him?
Geminian169
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 7:40 PM
Joined: 01/04/2009
Posts: 1


I completely agree with the last post, and I completely disagree with the post from Gilana. If you are being threatened by any force presented by other human beings you are absolutely entitled to defend yourself with an equal and opposing force. The reason these 'pirates' are raiding private vessels is because they know that the majority are un-armed and/or weak minded. If you sail into these waters without taking the necessary precautions then you are taking the same risks as cycling with no helmet, unprotected sex with strangers, travelling in a vehicle with out adequate restraints, sailing without lifejackets etc.......... I'm sorry Gilana but you sound like a victim to me, hopeful that things will be ok, don't rock the boat... I would rather people learned how to wield a shotgun with confidence and maturity in order to protect themselves pro-actively than to read any more of these news reports or any more of these weak minded posts in the following forums. You only get one life!! Do the right thing.
david
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 8:27 PM
Joined: 21/06/2008
Posts: 2


Sad post Gilana. Thugs and young PUNKS there. They know that 98% are not armed. 99% of the PUNKS can't read and 1% can and tell all from the press that no guns on yachts. EASY. With return gun fire, watch em think about it. Trust me I carry and have from 1978 on all my crossings off the east coast of the U.S. and CG knows. Start with 4 to 6 pirate boats blown out, see it slow down. Don't mess with the Stars & Stripes
Gilana
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 9:01 PM
Joined: 07/10/2010
Posts: 15


I'm no victim, I'm still here! The wisest man avoids senseless conflict.
I was on the phone today to friends who were sailing with Quest, who broke away from the convoy. My friends are shipping their yacht from Maldives to Turkey. A much wiser decision.
In Brasil, you have to give your weapon over at your port of arrival, then fly back to collect it after clearing out.
In Venezuela, a shotgun totin' neighbor anchored behind me, then he threatened some local fishermen, the Ve. Coastguard towed him in, that was over ten years ago, I bet he is still in prison there.

I've done my time, served in the military, seen action, those "Brave Words" about owning the area with a shotgun are complete baloney. One day you will understand this.  Speak to an older relative who knows about war, or, maybe I can make the day come sooner for you.  Lets say for the sake of this argument that we have two apposing forces. On one side, there is a lone farmer with a shotgun, inside his hut.  On the outside 15 heavily armed people who have trained and worked together and have tactical and combat experience.  Which person has the better chance of survival, one of the 15 or the lone farmer?

Here is the thing, when faced by 15 people all carrying AK's and RPG7's, who are either desperate, or suicidal, have nothing to lose, and are criminally or ideologically motivated, and are religiously "insured" against death, best dump your shotgun and play along until the odds improve. If you can not understand this advice, I rest my case.

It is precisely because some sailors were armed that they did not take appropriate decisions to avoid conflict.

Let none of this detract from the pain and sorrow felt by the families of the victims on board SV Quest, my deepest condolences to you.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 9:18 PM
25 years ago I was helping deliver a yacht to miami. Two small speed boats circled us at night, the captain had several guns aboard and fired at the boats, they returned fire but turned and left realizing we were not an easy target. They don't play by our rules so figure it out. You have to do what ever you can to survive. And Peter Blake knew that the recent trend was for the thieves to kill, so he saved the rest of the people on board from that end. He is a hero. Get your head out of the sand .....no mater how advanced some of us it is still survival of the fittest when you are dealing with extreme poverty. Get a gun, use it and ask questions later.
Gilana
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 9:22 PM
Joined: 07/10/2010
Posts: 15


david wrote:
Sad post Gilana. Thugs and young PUNKS there. They know that 98% are not armed. 99% of the PUNKS can't read and 1% can and tell all from the press that no guns on yachts. EASY. With return gun fire, watch em think about it. Trust me I carry and have from 1978 on all my crossings off the east coast of the U.S. and CG knows. Start with 4 to 6 pirate boats blown out, see it slow down. Don't mess with the Stars & Stripes


Thank you David, the sadness is not mine, it is S/V Quest's, but you prove my point exactly. BECAUSE you carry a shotgun, you WILL sail 30 miles off the coast of Somalia or into the Gulf of Aden. You WILL be outgunned. Whereas if you did NOT carry weapons, you would stay in the lanes patrolled by Operation Ocean Shield, or ship your yacht, or go round the Cape, or stay in Indonesia, or visit Chagos, or snorkel the Maldives.

You should not let your youthful bravado get the better of common sense. Your crossings might all have happened where arms are legal, (very few places)  In most countries I have sailed to and visited (about 60 at the last count) weapons are illegal, even if declared, and if undeclared could deny you your liberty and freedom for the rest of your life. I'm not talking about 3rd world places either, check your facts.

Indeed if the NATO task force cordoned off the area off Puntland and sunk the bastards one by one I would stand and applaud loudly. I hope that you understand my point of view, I have no hope that you will agree.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 2:38 AM

All of the above postings offer a unique view point on the current situation and piracy in general.  The problem with all of your advice is none of you are experienced maritime security professionals.  In addition, offering an opinion based mostly on emotion and less in fact will not do anything to help prevent future attacks from going bad.  Untill goverments have had enough pressure put on them by the shipping and oil industry to fix the problem by land, nothing will change out there.  The question of armed or unarmed vessels is situational and not an across the board answer.  If you are interested in the basics there are courses you can take that provide you with PROPER iformation.  In general, cruising vessels will always provide an opportunity due to size speed and what they represent.  Small vessels with weapons don't offer the tactical advantage that large vessels with weapons do, plain and simple.  You will not stop pirates with automatic weapons with one 12 gauge and a 1911 45.  Security is also not security if they are armed and you are not, regardless of the IMO and your flag states regulations on weapons on vessels.  Sound devices and water cannons will only slow them down not stop them in most cases.  My advice is to go cruising in a safer location till such a time that these areas in question are safe to travel again.  For those of you that don't feer that anything will happen and that it's your god given right to travel the worlds oceans.  Knowing what you now know from all the reports and world news, safe sailing.

Fair Winds,

Maritime Security Specialist

 


david
Posted: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 1:19 PM
Joined: 21/06/2008
Posts: 2


I,ll keep my 12 & 1944 or what ever 45 and use it to keep me safe as I CAN. And yes I did my time in Nam & Korea. If show that gun it's to be used. I've faced LARGE & small guns, looking at the wrong end, but still here to reply to you nemwits. Gilana, you will vote for Gaddafi, Rahm Emanuel next, want ua.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 1:21 PM
Having done the return passage past the Somali coast twice in the last few years, once with only an unarmed yacht crew and the other with an armed security force, I feel that a professionally trained armed security force onboard a yacht is a valuable insurance policy for both the crews safety and protection of the vessel. The captains of smaller yachts where physically accommodating extra crew onboard or costs of these professional security forces make them unfeasible should acknowledge the real threat posed to them in these areas. These captains need to acknowledge the worst case scenario which can be sadly exemplified with the incident involving S/V Quest. If i was asked as a crew member to sail through these areas in a 18m unarmed sailing yacht with a relatively low cruising speed and exceptionally low free-board I would simply leave and start looking for a new job. Is any job worth this kind of trauma or your life?? With that said having a captain sleeping with a 12 gauge shotgun under his bed is simply not a solution either. The whole idea of having professional security forces is to detect threats and deal with them before they endanger the yacht or its crew. That means constant vigilant security watches in conjunction with the crews navigational watches. Professionally trained security forces should be able to deter most pirate threats with a show of force such as long range warning shots from a high powered rifle, most pirates will look for easier pickings. These pirates only respect two things, Money and Force. As a boat captain you must decide whether you, your crew and vessel being taken hostage and held to ransom is an acceptable outcome. Simply put Captains should understand the risks and ask themselves is it worth it???? unfortunately the danger is real and well documented and having a shotgun under the bed or a 'it wont happen to us' attitude is a solution for only the brave and very foolish.
Leslie Martin
Posted: Thursday, February 24, 2011 9:05 PM
Joined: 03/01/2010
Posts: 16


These other two people were friends of mine from Seattle and members of one of the same clubs, SSYC (Seattle Singles Yacht Club). They had been sailing their own boat for a number of years since around 2006, and for whatever reason, joined the Adams' at some point. Their names are Bob Riggle and Phyllis Mackey. Very sad news. We should all be able to protect ourselves.

Leslie Martin

formerly of S/V Illusion in Seattle

(now boatless in Fort Lauderdale)

 


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 26, 2011 4:32 AM
(And Peter Blake knew that the recent trend was for the thieves to kill, so he saved the rest of the people on board from that end. He is a hero) I am a proud Kiwi and against guns. If Peter Blake did not have a gun that night, he would have survived, as most of his crew and the final write up at the inquest stated. Yes we are very proud what he acheived in his life, and he didnt deserve to have his life ended the way it did. But that just reinstates that guns are not the answer
Robert
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 6:08 PM
Joined: 09/06/2008
Posts: 3


COPENHAGEN, Denmark – Pirates reportedly have hijacked a Danish sailboat with four adults and three children on board. The ship was hijacked Thursday while traveling through the Indian Ocean and is now on its way to Somalia, Denmark's Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Charlotte Slente told DR News, a national TV News channel in Denmark. A Danish couple, their three children and two technicians were on board the sailboat, DR News reported. Navy Operational Command started investigating immediately after receiving a distress signal from the Danish boat, Slente said. All relatives of those on board the boat have been informed of the events and are in close contact with the Danish authorities, Slente told the station. "This is a very difficult situation - even to relatives. Not least because there are children involved, and therefore we are asking the Danish media about being gentle on the relatives, " she said. For security reasons the Ministry would not supply any further details on the missing passengers, DR News reported.Source: Foxnews Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/02/28/somali-pirates-capture-danish-ship-seven-board/#ixzz1FHJoczLj
Capt. Marty
Posted: Tuesday, March 1, 2011 6:17 PM
Joined: 21/02/2010
Posts: 1


I am a Viet Nam era Marine and have been a boat Captain for over 35 years and have had boats approach me in the night and when they are close enough on my radar and I don't see running lights all I have to do is fire a few rounds in the air and watch them turn away on my radar, most pirates once they know you are armed usually will turn tail and if they don't they are in for a fight, pirates like punks prey on the weak and are cowards just like terrorists that prey on women and children rather than go against a man with a gun that will fight back and I am ready to take any captain's job and will protect the owner and his family, we cannot let pirates stop us from sailing and enjoying ourselves. captainmartyboyle@gmail.com

Capt Edward P
Posted: Wednesday, March 2, 2011 12:56 PM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


Nicely said Marty, Ed@hideousfrance.com
 
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