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B1/B2 visa
Roni
Posted: Thursday, February 10, 2011 5:10 AM
Joined: 03/12/2009
Posts: 9


Hi, I work on a yacht and this is my 3rd season in Florida. This year when I entered the USA by air the immigration officer gave me a hard time!!! He didn't like the fact that I went in and out the country so many times at the last 3 years. This season We started in Florida and went to the Bahamas and came back to Ft. lauderdale. I'm not relaxed about this issue, thinking about the future,as a tourist or a business women when I won't have the yacht employment letter from the Captain. I wanted to ask about the procedure to go out of the USA? We usually send our I-94 by mail to Port Everglades immigration office when we get to the Bahamas or so. Is that what we supposed to do? One more thing, when we entered the USA last month, they didn't write the date when the vise expired, Do I need to be worried about that? I know that as soon as you stay more than what it says you can't came in again.... Thank you
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, February 10, 2011 10:48 AM
People need to understand that entry into foreign countries is a privilege and not a right. Getting a hard time when your clearing into a country something I’ve come to expect, as is being heavily questions when I leave. The procedure is simple fill in the forms honestly, hand them in and follow the rules. All the forms, finger prints and digital photo’s taken during entry go into a massive data base that defines you and your immigration history. Maybe you need to spend less time in specific countries?
Roni
Posted: Thursday, February 10, 2011 3:01 PM
Joined: 03/12/2009
Posts: 9


I totally agree that entering into foreign countries is a privilege and not a right. spending less time in specific countries? Well, I do it for working on a boat and according to the boat cruising plan. I never do something which is illegal or over stay so I just want to double check that things are being done correct on my vessel... Thank you
rodsteel
Posted: Thursday, February 10, 2011 8:55 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Roni,

 

This Q&A link has one item discussing missing info on the I-94 (like length of stay).

 

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/id_visa/i-94_instructions/arrival_departure_record.xml

 

Regards,

 

Rod

 

P.S. The back of the I-94 has instructions for departure processing (looks like the yacht gathers them and submits to CBP)

 


Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 11, 2011 8:07 PM
Hello Roni, Understand your concerns and according to my experience here is my advice: 1)Always cross the US border with a letter from the captain and the foreign flag yacht registration. Also, I would suggest printing out the following link http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/types/types_5005.html. if necessary , show to the immigration officer the Private Yacht Crewmember section. Some of them are not aware about what kind of Visa requires a yacht crew member. 2)If you travel to the US for business or pleasure, bring with you: hotel reservations, bank statements, health insurance proof, etc . I travel all the time to the US for work or pleasure but as long as you can prove the purpose of your trip, they might give you a hard time, but they will let you in. 3)Home Land Security Officers can be very rude and aggressive. Stay calm and show the papers and documentation you have. Don’t argue with them; answer their questions in a soft and polite way. Don’t take it personal, it is just part of their culture the way they may treat foreigners at their borders. It is always advisable to have handy the phone of your embassy in the US. Hope this help.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 11, 2011 8:07 PM
The CBP have a tough time keeping the unwanted out, and when it comes to making the decision of who they allow in, the only thing they have to go on is what they have on record. They don't know at that moment that you are a hard working deckhand playing by the rules and not another freeloader. Being allowed into a country that is not your own is a privilege and not a right. If your boss has kept your boat in the states for a long period of time, you need to make sure that he/she knows the fine line you will have to tread when you re-enter. Its not easy when you know it could either mean losing your job or losing your visa. Good luck to all those in that situation, I know it sucks.
chrismlewis
Posted: Friday, February 11, 2011 9:03 PM
Joined: 09/10/2008
Posts: 120


This is all worth bearing in mind when you are told the itinerary of the yacht at interview. Certainly well worth stressing that having a visa does NOT guarantee that you will get past the border! Bring all the supporting evidence that you have to support your claim that you are eligible to be granted entry. If you do not have any options then you will have to take your chances; if you have the option then go with where you are welcome!! I used to get grief every time going to the US having spent several years in and out regularly on yachts and for holidays. Now all my boss's refit dollars get spent in the Med... Don't get me wrong, I like going to the US and am happy to visit for short periods either for yachting or snowboarding, but my days of being there 4 or 6 months of the year are over.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 12, 2011 3:51 PM
Roni, the date stamped into your passport would be the determining period (even if it's not correct for the visa, say, being given 6 month on a C1/D visa, which should only be 29 days). Having no date would mean you cannot overstay a particular date but to be safe I would not push that too much. As an American capt. I have crew of all nationalities and we have to comply worldwide, be it the Caribbean, Med or USA. We clear in and out of Caribbean islands multiple times per season and never is it said that we have entered too many times. The islands know the boats bring in a lot of revenue and it's good for the economy. As I live in the US I like to take the boat there whenever possible. The boat owner is a foreigner and can take his boat anywhere else in the world. For the people stating you stay in the US too much please realise yachting/ boating is a global industry and that the US should encourage yachts coming to its shores and help keep the economy going. Competition creates excellence, isolation does not.
jakekaj
Posted: Sunday, February 13, 2011 3:25 AM
Joined: 02/08/2008
Posts: 7


You can apply through the freedom of information act for a copy of your record from US Customs. May help you realise whats happening and why.
usasafezone
Posted: Thursday, August 11, 2011 2:26 AM
Joined: 07/08/2011
Posts: 1


I have an E2 visa (British, parents visa) valid till July 2012. I am looking to do relevant course to become a stewardess and seek employment in the yachting industry. Do I still have to apply for B1/2 visa even though my i94 is valid till July 2012.
garciayounes
Posted: Friday, October 7, 2011 6:54 PM
Joined: 07/10/2011
Posts: 39


hi ; maybe is the wrong post but......... i am a spanish citizen living in belgium. can i do my visa b1b2 in south africa ? i booked my training there m and it looks the process is faster, thanks
rodsteel
Posted: Saturday, October 8, 2011 8:54 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Technically the answer seems to be "yes", however take a look at this link for the "caveats":

 

http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/types/types_1262.html#4

 

Good Luck,

 

Rod


garciayounes
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 3:34 PM
Joined: 07/10/2011
Posts: 39


thanks Rod
 
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