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Daywork Rates
yaya
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 2:36 PM
Joined: 04/06/2008
Posts: 14


Hello Everyone. Could you please let me know what are the going rates for day work in Fort Lauderdale. Does the rate change with different skill jobs (varnish, top coats)?
junior
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 3:34 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


In this port dayworkers charge 100 euro per hard days work...normally 8 to 9 hours with free lunch on the boat. ..... When dayworkers become involved with skilled.." top coat work" they receive a 5000 euro fine from the port police, are thrown out of the yard and deported if non EU. You would be wise to never solicit " Black Work" that in anyway interferes with the livelihoods of legitimate contractors. Don't believe me ? try it.........the local contractors will eat you........
yaya
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 3:47 PM
Joined: 04/06/2008
Posts: 14


Thanks Junior... I'll make sure to stick to wash downs and polish when down there....
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 5:57 PM
Day-workers are dime a dozen, rates are whatever is on offer. ----Yards are making it more and more difficult to hire day workers and in most cases it’s virtually impossible to gain access to yachts because marinas and shipyards check identification and require you to be signed on as crew. ----Day-working is something from the past and to be completely honest I’d prefer it if day workers and dock walkers stayed the hell away, because finding people is never a problem, whereas finding reliable people is. ---- So called professional day workers tend to be people that are unable to hold down a fulltime position. --------P.S. are you an American Citizen or Greencard holder yaya? I see your profile has your nationality as Ni-Vanuatu so I can assume your intend on working illegitimately in the USA which is pretty dam foolish and putting your mug on Dockwalk when you intend on working under the table is really dumb. ---- If your not legal to work in the USA I be very careful because there are plenty of people that are willing to rat you out.
junior
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 6:44 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


The answer to the original question..what are the guys charging ? ....average 30 euro per hour for general, non spray , paint and varnish work . Remember these guys are two men in a truck, registered contractors. I dont know any small contractors doing spray anymore..the regulations are brutal. I would imagine the rates are similar in Florida.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 14, 2011 9:53 PM
Asking a question is still not illegal. Even in the USA.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 15, 2011 1:41 AM
Actively looking for work in shipyards, marinas, handing out business cards and resumes is edging towards the wrong side of immigration law because it is an activity and evidence that you intend on working illegitimately not just a question. ---- If you don't believe ask an official next time your at events like the FLIBS and see where you end up --- European countries, American and many yachting destinations ignore transient day workers and dock walkers for the most part, whereas locals and companies that see these people as competition are beginning to take action because they are desperate for work. So lets not be naive and acknowledge that day working without proper papers is illegal. Just read the do's and don'ts written in a recent dockwalk post.
Mike O'Neill
Posted: Saturday, January 15, 2011 2:07 AM
Joined: 03/06/2009
Posts: 13


Easy folks. I think you all missed the point of the discussion. The guy asked for the going rates, not the legality thereof. Thats a whole other can of worms. Lets stick with the subject. To answer your question mate, we pay $15 / hour when we hire dayworkers. Hope this helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 15, 2011 2:31 AM
Are we encouraging people to work illegally on dockwalk? Oh by the way Mike I was paying $15 bucks an hour in 1995, so maybe its about time you raised your hourly rates so people can survive.--- Yaya whats the going rate in Ni-Vanuatu?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 15, 2011 6:35 PM
The original question was simple enough. Unfortunately, $20/hr has been the norm for years. Varnishing is/has been a normal dayworking job for exterior for years. Other painting may fall into a contractors description and wages/employment get cloudy. It's amusing that the previous poster of the legality of dayworking can also dispute the wage. How can you give advise on something you don't participate in? Good luck in your search, we've all been there !
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 12:38 AM
Oh it really looks like the page has filled with contractors looking to promote and maintain an hourly rate... mmmm daily rate is what you are offered for the job on offer. You know supply and demand and the job you are are doing, what is the skill etc. If you are washing a boat down, varnishing or scraping a bilge rates could be any where from $100 to €100 per day. if you have a real skill and are a professional sprayer, engineer, you may if you are lucky find a job on $15 - $35 per hour. Rates need to be compared on an individual basis based on reliability, experience and reputation. just as in any profession some candidates rarely make it out of bed from their last binge. Daywork varies from skill to skill, nationality to nationality and country to country.
junior
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 7:28 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Dont know how other captains do it but when you have a big winter work list forming...a paint job... I never hire dayworkers...I take on an extra refit crew. There are always talented engineers or seasoned deck crew between jobs who will happily work for 3000 per month simply so they may stay on station to look for a new permanent position , take a few license upgrade class's or simply enjoy the freedom of paid downtime in a nice town. . . Some of these crew are very talented, bring a new shot on energy to the program, allow the yacht to bypass the legalities of daywork, port clearance, and the stigma of daywork when joining your crew list. Always best to keep work in house ...best value for the yacht . If youre a mechanically talented crew looking for a crew job be sure to inform the agents and brokers that you are are also available for short contract refit work. Be even more specific and go after the big paint jobs as a hardware remover, fitter crew. Every paint job needs one.
Mike O'Neill
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 4:33 PM
Joined: 03/06/2009
Posts: 13


I always have a laugh reading these forums when the people with the most to say hide behind "anonymous" identities. How can we value your opinions when you hide your ID. Don't be shy, and let your voice be taken seriously.
Septic tank
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 6:13 PM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


Shipyards like STP in Palma, Astilleros De Mallorca, MB 92 Barcelona, Rybovich in West Palm Beach, Directors in Ft Lauderdale and others have tight security and for good reason, yachts are worth millions of dollars and day workers are illegitimate and uninsured workers that don’t conform to International Ship & Port Security (ISPS). Employing day workers is not as simple as it once was and it’s only going to become more complicated. Security passes and proof of insurance from the boat are standard requirements nowadays and shipyards don’t allow day workers and dock walkers in unless they are on the crew list. The truth of the matter is this, day workers are unskilled labor that get a daily rate of about US$100 or €100 per day depending on experience and skill.
Mike O'Neill
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 9:16 PM
Joined: 03/06/2009
Posts: 13


I was just poking around on www.bls.gov/home.htm and found that the mean average for general labour (housekeeping, janitors, serving staff, etc) in Florida is $9.39-$10.36 per hour, before tax. So I think my previous post that we pay $15/hr or $100 per day for dayworkers pretty fair, especially as they are not taxed or anything. Also, bear in mind, as "Septic Tank" pointed out the yards are getting very strict. Places like Rybovich are now charging $50 per day per person for dayworkers, contractors, etc. in the form of a "levy" or "gate fee". So our $100 per day worker now costs us $150pd. Food for thought.
KMD
Posted: Sunday, January 16, 2011 10:26 PM
Joined: 16/05/2008
Posts: 2


I think that any day worker that has a problem with making $15 per hour needs to remind themselves WHY they are Dayworking. They should put their focus more on what they can learn from experienced crew and build their skill set, as this is what will get them a permanent job. It always amuses me hearing about dayworkers "demanding" top dollar with very little skills to back it up. $15 per hour with lunch is more than fair! The experience gained is what they should put the real value on.
yaya
Posted: Monday, January 17, 2011 1:58 AM
Joined: 04/06/2008
Posts: 14


Does smoking a cigaretter on TV enduce teenage smoking? Would they not have smoked anyway? I was just asking a question....and regarding Anonymous's question, the rate in Vanuatu varies depending on seasonal fruit production. But we are extrememly sensitive when it comes to foreigners coming into our country and trying to work there. We do not appreciate what we regard to be competition over scarse jobs. It makes no difference to us if there foreigners would return the favor to us when we come into their country or if they are actual good, honest people or not. As far as we're concerned in Vanuatu all foreigners are trying to steal jobs that are rightfully ours...but that's neither here nor there.
junior
Posted: Monday, January 17, 2011 9:11 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Septic's statement is a bit extreme. I was just in STP...there are dozens of dayworkers inside. There were dozens of REFIT CREW inside. If there is the need , the need will be met. Inside STP I have never seen an official walking the docks asking for ID..NEVER. Trouble brews when dayworkers infringe on the livelihood of contractors. Trouble brews when iresponsible captains hire teams of dayworkers to the detriment of contractors. It is the contractors who file a complaint with the port police. STP could give a dam..all they want is the yachts money and for yachts to complete thier work list as fast as possible so the next yacht can haul. To avoid problems Dont make enemies... If the yacht has an army of dayworkers its a lemon, dont get near it....and Dont infuriate the contractors by performing contractor work. MIND YOUR MANNERS. If you are a dayworker rolling a coat of antifoul on the bottom of a superyacht the contractors will get you. If your handling a sander or powertool leveling a teak deck they will get you. Dayworker means simple prep work...when you prep the site for the contractors , everyone is happy..there will be no problems. The whole industry would collapse without dayworkers. The contractors working in STP actually recommend reliable dayworkers to me . There is no contractor who comes to your boat and unbends the mainsail from the boom then muscles it into the sailmakers truck. ..there is no company who cleans , vacumes and paints the engine room bilge before the engineering contractor fits the generator , there is no company who washes the boat 4 times a week to control the huge STP dust cloud that settles on deck each day. . Asking the normal salary , for normal daywork, is a legitimate question. 100 euros per day..3000 euros per month when signed on the ships papers as a refit crew is the typical rate.
glenngorman
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 7:51 PM
Joined: 23/09/2008
Posts: 2


I went from paying $12 to $15 3 of 4 years ago, I think it is fair and have not had a problem getting people.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 8:48 PM
$15 plus Lunch...thanks for coming!
G
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 9:04 PM
Joined: 24/03/2010
Posts: 4


Better yet, find the dayworkers on line. You get to check their resumes, etc. so you get to choose who's qualified. Try this totally free site: http://AllYachtJobs.com
Noakley23
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 9:15 PM
Joined: 18/07/2010
Posts: 1


yaya! you still @ the same crew house? ( its nick from aussie btw) on mystere atm
mate i was getting 15 an hour on most jobs. so aim for around that, most of the guys i knew were either on that or very close to it.
take care bud!
say hi to kris for me!

Captain Frank Campbell
Posted: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 11:45 PM
Joined: 11/09/2008
Posts: 4


Captain Mike I am laughing with you. To answer the QUESTION, $15.00 is what I pay. It's unskilled labor. Cash.....................
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 1:43 PM
We pay in the range $12-$15.00 /hr for folks who generally have no clue and we have to train them (they should be paying us for the training) We pay $20-$30 for really experienced workers.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 12:55 AM
USA - $10 an hour no lunch and 10€ in the EU. If your varnishing that depends $17.50 - $20 and the same in €. You wouldn't put varnishing in the same league as contractors. In regards to getting into yards, where there's a will there's a way. Generally the aim of dayworking is to secure full time employment. You have to remember that there might be someone with the same skills but will work for less.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 20, 2011 9:40 PM

Well  I resent those who say they won't hire day workers. Sure some may be bad or not legitimate or good at any skill. I for one am an American citizen who happened to relocate to Fort Lauderdale recently. How else is one to survive, meet new people or network while looking for a long term onboard position? Just because people are looking to daywork (not their first choice), doesn't mean they don't have skills to offer!

Oh, but I do also resent the many foreigners (nothing personal against you, just business) that are taking jobs away from American citizens! I've been in dayworking jobs listening to hired foreigners badmouth this country. What the hell are you doing here if you don't like it!


Michael MacEachern
Posted: Friday, January 21, 2011 12:02 AM
Joined: 15/11/2010
Posts: 37


As far as foreigners taking jobs. . . Sure there are more people in the market then, and it may make it more difficult, but that should just mean you should work your butt off when you get the opportunity. SHOW people that you are on a mission and are fully capable of working hard, and have something to offer. If you do that, then there will not be any issues. . And YES, I am an american. . I just dont like the complaining about foreigners. If you are good enough for a job, you will get the job. If you do a few days of daywork and they never call you back. . well. . The call was probably not going to come. I have been in Ft lauderdale 2 months(with a 2 week holiday for christmas) and have had no trouble finding daywork. . EVEN with all the foreigners "stealing jobs". I have seen average $15/hr between me and most of the other people I know that have been dayworking here.
Chief
Posted: Friday, January 21, 2011 1:31 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


" As far as we're concerned in Vanuatu all foreigners are trying to steal jobs that are rightfully ours..."

Wow, that view of visitors must make life difficult for the Vanuatu Tourist Office.

 
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