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Engineer apprenticeship?
Co.Jones
Posted: Monday, November 22, 2010 7:48 PM
Joined: 14/12/2009
Posts: 2


Has anyone heard of a engineer apprenticeship on a yacht?
Dean
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 1:39 AM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


The short answer to your question is “NO”. - - - - An apprenticeship in the traditional sense encompasses five elements 1) Education (College) - - - - 2) Work experience (On the Job Training) - - - - 3) Mentoring (A Mentor / Career Guide) - - - - 4) Counseling (Teach & Reinforce Social Responsibility) - - - - 5) Competency standards (Academic Examinations & Practical Skill Task Book). - - - - Yacht employers like turnkey employees, because they can put them to work straightaway and the best way to achieve this would be the introduction of a six to twelve month college program that incorporates theory and practical workshops. - - - - For example the Australian Maritime College offers a Pre-sea marine engineering, engineering practice, and safety training program, Guided at-sea study programs, watch-keeper education and training up to second and Chief Engineer education and training. - - - - See link http://www.amc.edu.au/undergrad/course/engineer-officer-cadet - - - - As a final comment - - - - To have an apprentice engineer you need a Chief and qualified watch-keepers, you also need an engineering team that rotates people between duty periods, educational periods and vacation periods. Few yachts offer rotation and even fewer yachts seem have the resources to train junior engineers outside the daily work routines, which provide a very narrow learning envelope.
junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:31 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Commercial engineer and yacht engineer are two different beasts. The classic backdoor route for yacht engineers is to work for an engineering contractor. I just had MTU swing by for an Engine check. The chief brought along a young guy for helping out. I was talking to the young guy...perhaps 21 years old , and his desire was yacht engineering. He was already doing beginner yacht classes . In a few years, By the time this young guy accumulates his basic engineering paperwork, he will have VAST experience with many different engines ,many pieces of marine machinery installed by many different shipyards. . He will also know all the yachts and have his foot in the door when something comes up .
Dean
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 10:26 AM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


You make a valid point Junior, nevertheless a problem exists with unqualified engineer candidates because you need to be an engineer before you can work as an engineer in most cases and yachting does not really have a viable solution for this. - - - - I came up through the apprenticeship system, went to marine college and then began working as an assistant engineer, what I learnt during my apprenticeship is still valid today.- - - - But the attitude and motivation of youths today is not what it was 20 years ago. - - - - Newbies want instant respect, good pay and tend to question more than they learn. - - - - - Basically what I'd like to see change is the mindset of wannabe engineers and an improvement in the skill level of entry level people. - - - - It is very difficult to teach a person in the field when they are not equipped with fundamental knowledge and this is precisely why I would like to see a pre-sea program for future yacht engineers that combines theory and practical lessons. - - - - The combination of theory and practical provides ah-hu moments that magically connect hands and minds and to be a successful engineer you need be good hands skills and a sharp mind. - - - - At the end of a day a degreed engineer might be lousy with tools and a handy diesel mechanic might be struggle with more academic elements of engineering knowledge that are essential higher learning as they progress in their career.
junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 2:02 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


This is true...proper, rigorous education always creates the best engineer. Every Time I have a challenging technical problem..I must contact a classically trained engineer to sort it out. Many yachts operate the same. Another question is..how many yachts need a fully professional engineer ? Id say only the biggest...the rest...80 percent of the fleet, simply hope and pray that they can find a guy to fit into the crew , with good knowledge and experience to keep the show on the road until the next refit stop, then the pro contractors are flown in. Once again..by all means pursue the commercial, education, seat time equation to engineer status. It truley is the best way to success. If this is not possible....go back door.
Chief
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 4:16 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"...seat time ..."

That's the most difficult time to acquire at sea. 


Tristan
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 4:57 PM
Joined: 30/06/2008
Posts: 19


Pendennis Shipyard has been running an apprentice programme for all trades since 98,  it has been a huge success for both the young people in Cornwall and the Shipyard itself.   Well over 100 Apprentices have been through the system and as far as I know, every one of the boys and girls that completed the 4 year course, so far has been offered full time work in the Shipyard.  Plenty have then crossed over to work on yachts and some have been poached by other firms!  I know all the trade managers onsite would agree it is an asset to have young people who have been specifically trained in the way of the Superyacht ,  I also  understand apprentices past and present make up about 10% of the 360 strong work force on the yard up to a Management level.  This scheme has won the UK’s top award 2 years in a row bust most importantly I know this type of scheme also goes on in yards from Holland to NZ to the USA so whatever country you are from get in contact with the Shipyards and give it a shot.  As people have mentioned in previous posts on this site, crews do change when boats are in refit and obviously plenty are taken on during builds, so in certain cases what better place to be?  Good luck. TR.


junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 6:15 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Many of the big shipyards are the same. The yard I work with in the Netherlands always has young guys going thru the classic trades apprenticeship. I recently received an update from the yard informing me that a New Chief Engineer has been appointed....after 23 years service at the yard, a whole long list of projects, trade and educational qualifications , full ship license, and he started as apprentice. Very worthwhile...earn while you learn ..entry into engineering.
 
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