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How do you stop a "look-at-me" crewmember
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, October 29, 2010 4:26 PM
Look at me – How do you stop a good person from acting like a clown?????? I work with a lad that must be the center of attention, when he is up, he is up and when he is down he is down. Everyone empathizes with his desire to be part of the team, but unfortunately the oddball way he interacts with people wears people down, consequently he finds himself the article of ridicule more often than not. I recently suggested he tone it down a notch, try and be more conventional and learn to respect other people’s space. Yachts are not kindergartens or youth hostels; mother is not going to clean up your mess and the surest way be taken as a fool is to behave like one.
Daves714
Posted: Saturday, October 30, 2010 6:17 AM
Joined: 22/10/2010
Posts: 12


How do you handle those who act as boss and critic too often?
Henning
Posted: Saturday, October 30, 2010 6:21 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Well, if you've already sat down and talked to them about it and that didn't do any good (make sure you give them a written notification that they sign), you either fire them or wait till they get themselves killed.


Henning
Posted: Saturday, October 30, 2010 6:23 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Daves714 wrote:
How do you handle those who act as boss and critic too often?


Well, if they are your boss, you either say "yes sir" or you quit working for them.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, November 2, 2010 12:42 AM
Nothing better sends a message then a temporary leave of absence, psycho eval and a no liqour policy just for him for three months.
keepingitreal
Posted: Tuesday, November 2, 2010 6:55 PM
Joined: 22/08/2009
Posts: 9


I agree 100% with Henning on this one. Simple really.
Jacques Basson
Posted: Tuesday, November 2, 2010 7:40 PM
Joined: 04/03/2010
Posts: 1


honestly are you kidding me! I did not even read the posts but its clear and simple, why even ask. I have been a 1st Officer for 4 years and do not need Dockwise advise to figure this one out, for the one who wrote this if you cant figure out what to do then you in the wrong position, wrong career man! come on wake up! Old chopper Reed saying! Harden the F#*k Up!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, November 2, 2010 9:01 PM
If somebody is constantly seeking attention, they are merely looking for approval and acceptance. A good leader will give direction, set boundaries and capitalize on the positive energy of youth. At the end of the day leadership is all about guidance and getting people to do what you want. You can't expect an apprentice to be a master unless you take time to educate, train and mentor them. You can fire as many people as you wish, but eventually team leaders need to determine whether the failure of staff is an outcome of your actions or theirs, especially when your employing these people in the first instance. I employ people with potential and it is up to me to help them achieve their full potential by leading them forward and correcting them whenever it is required, all to often people fail to reinforce their own rules and let standards drop.
keepingitreal
Posted: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 12:28 AM
Joined: 22/08/2009
Posts: 9


c'mon, the guy sounds like a numbnut, based on the orignal post. Easy with the apologist angle. kick him/her to the kerb (dock). Gently, but firmly.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 8:15 AM
Mr. Aggressive you must br wonderful to work for. Clearly there are times when a person is unsuitable and needs to leave. Engaging crew and discharging crew correctly would be something your learnt during business and law. The harden up ideology you prefer has consequences, few of which are positive. My objective was to see how or if team leaders are cognizant of their role when it comes to mentoring crew. So if you fire greenhorn x who do you replace him with and how do you get the most out of them while you show the ropes and how they should act on and off the boat??????
The Crew Coach
Posted: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 10:06 AM
Joined: 05/07/2010
Posts: 14


I couldn't agree more that this is a leadership concern, as much as a problem with that individual. It's important to recognise that any kind of behaviour like this is a cry for help. The less you help, the louder they cry and the more disruption they will cause. So why bother helping, you ask? Because if you do succeed in turning this crew member's behaviour around you'll not only create a fiercely loyal supporter in them, you'll learn a lot yourself that will help make you an even better manager. There are some great books you can read on people management - try the One Minute Manager series by Ken Blanchard & associates http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_18?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=one+minute+manager&x=0&y=0&sprefix=one+minute+manager
racerkaren@hotmail.com
Posted: Thursday, November 4, 2010 9:26 PM
Joined: 04/11/2010
Posts: 1


Actually, that sounds like a classic example of someone with a certain form of depression.  Seemingly extrovertial - likely with little deep-down self-confidence - although perhaps an introvert at the core.  I've come across this a lot in my life and it's true about 'those who are the hardest to love...'
My best suggestion is to support them, and be open with them - as you have been.  Try befriending them - you'll get a likely annoyingly loyal friend, but one who might calm down when they realize they have a friend around.  This behavior is not typically changeable without an antidepressant or something similar...
This is only my take on the subject.
K

Henning
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 9:21 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


The problem with continuously "mentoring" the mentally deficient is that they pose not only a hazard to themselves but also to others and to the safety of the vessel. If they can't get their act together, one has no choice but to get them off the vessel. Remember, as captain you hold the liability for the actions of your crew, and you also hold a moral obligation to the safety of the rest of the crew. I don't disagree that you should have a sit down with them first, but if it's an ongoing issue, you are responsible to everyone else and them to keep them out of harms way. You also owe it to the owner sice the civilpenalties for your liability pass onto them. If said goofball manages to get themselves killed, rest assured that their family is going to sue you and the owner, I don't care where they are from. These are working vessels, not kindergarten. If they cannot get their act together, you are obliged to get rid of them. Maybe they'll take that lesson to heart and not screw up at their next gig. This is not a "feel good" industry, there are too many hazards for it to be. As to "Who do you replace them with?" the answer is "Someone more serious about the job." There's a fine line between having fun (acceptable and encouraged) and posing a hazard to self and others (unacceptable and discouraged). If someone can't make that distinction, they have no place onboard a vessel.

 
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