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Crossing meal ideas with Owner on board..
Marianne
Posted: Friday, October 1, 2010 11:59 AM
Joined: 11/09/2008
Posts: 5


Hi there, I've just been told that the boss wants to come on for the crossing. He does not have a large amount of sailing experience and I believe this will be his first crossing. Seeing as it's the first time for me to do a crossing with the boss on board, i'd quite like to ask you all to give me some idea of what meals to make for him. I'm under the impression he will want a certain amount of guest service whilst underway The boat is a sailing vessel, not very large and I'll be doing sailing watches also next to cooking, so that will limit my time available in the galley Thanks in advance!
Henning
Posted: Friday, October 1, 2010 2:35 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


You can try asking him.... I tend to have them fed as crew. I treat them as crew as well. Most owners understand that things are different on a delivery as the boat becomes the more "needy" of attention and the crew that is onboard revolve around serving her needs, not theirs. Many of them actually enjoy being able to step back from all the rest of their crap in their lives, follow some simple instructions and hang out on their boat at sea and advance their own seamanship. I also think it's good that they get a taste of what our lives are like and that we aren't out on a "pleasure cruise" when we go somewhere.

Harbiner-01
Posted: Friday, October 1, 2010 6:37 PM
Joined: 09/09/2010
Posts: 2


When you say crossing, do you mean across the Pond or a shorter passage?
Marianne
Posted: Saturday, October 2, 2010 12:28 PM
Joined: 11/09/2008
Posts: 5


He's crossing the pond with us from the Canaries to Antigua. He has however indicated already that he expects a certain level of guest service on board and for it not to be a "normal all-crew crossing". I'm thinking I can do nibbles as apetizers and then a main course, but am looking for some inspiration on what mains to prepare that will look good enough for him and will be manageable in my appr. 1hour max time in the galley..!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, October 2, 2010 2:33 PM
Don't worry about him, he will be in the head puking, hahaha. You could ask for a temp OOW for the crossing to free up some time to take care of him. I would make sure he knows exactly what to expect.
junior
Posted: Saturday, October 2, 2010 6:07 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Probably best to serve him standard Chef food untill youre well offshore, no turning back, then spike his grub and put him down for the next week or so. If ya' hit em' hard enough then you can simply feed him cookies and crisps..... should keep him conscious till you can off load the sausage in Barbados
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Sunday, October 3, 2010 4:55 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Does the owner realise how long he will be at sea?Take plenty of tinned vegetables, long life UHT milk, stale bread, instant mash spuds, pot noodle soups and soggy biscuits. He will soon reconsider his choice to cross the Atlantic.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Sunday, October 3, 2010 8:27 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


And another thing... Shortly after leaving the dock you inform the boss of the fun and traditional 'guess who's in the galley' mystery cook rota where all onboard attempt to create something edible each day...
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, October 5, 2010 9:54 PM
Bollocks. I wanted to be the first person to mention 'poison.'
Honestly though, champagne flutes just don't stay upright in that constant, Force 7, deep blue, mid-Atlantic swell. Even with non-slip. And especially among a dry crew. Instead, have him nibble on the additional and temporary crossing-crew. His missus has been be left behind, after all. And you can always have a chuckle when he's pissed that his Blackberry's not working seven days out from nowhere, the pre-paid sat phone is out of credit, and the Navtex can only receive, not send.

14Freedom
Posted: Tuesday, October 5, 2010 11:10 PM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Hey All,

Right on with owners for a passage. Been there, done that.
Didn't see him for DAYS between Little San Salvador and Puerto Rico, slogging 2.5 kts through a Force 9.
I had Aerosmith and Rollling Stones playing for hours...enjoyed Raman and Hot Pockets.
The owner never did another passage and had new respect for his crew.

ATB-
The Slacker

Planet Massage & Chef Mark Lohmann
Posted: Tuesday, October 5, 2010 11:41 PM
Joined: 23/05/2008
Posts: 10


Marrianne, personally, I'd run. In my opinion, it is not appropriate to try to attain that level of guest service and do your job as watch crew at the same time. An owner requesting this is just asking a bit too much for my tastes at least. I've done them before with owners who didn't mind being treated as crew, but if they don't accept that fact, that they are in fact "crew" on a crossing, it is bound to be a really tough trip on you, and in my humble opinion, unfair. At least half of the captains I have worked for on boats big and small didn't want the chef even dong watches so they could in fact take care of the crew that was doing watches. I understand my attitude is a little hard line and I don’t mean to be mean spirited and cynical, but, I have been in the business for over two decades and always give my all at any job I commit to. That being said, I'm a bit particular about not committing to situations that I don't feel are fair to all nor ones in which I can't shine without a boatload of unnecessary stress working 24/7, all so the owner can tell his buddies how he sailed across the pond. If he’s that much of a yachty, let him act like one. If it has to be, one pot meals with a salad, sandwiches, a tray of lasagna, typical crossing fare...and be prepared to forage without help if it gets too nasty. In any case, it you do it, you'll need a massage at the end of it, come see us at Planet Massage in Fort Lauderdale if you make it this way
yachtone
Posted: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 1:57 AM
Joined: 27/07/2008
Posts: 96


Unfortunately you are in a no-win situation with an owner who has champagne taste and a beer budget. Try to get the Captain to get an extra crew to do the watches for you as the owner will be seriously short-tempered if he expects to have full service and a holiday on a crossing in a smallish sailboat and will pick on any obvious shortcomings like non-gourmet meals even ( or especially ) if he is to seasick to eat them. I suggest you stock up on cheeses, pates and quality pasta sauces so you can quickly present appetisers or snacks regularly to dull the appetite for formal 3 course meals. Try to stock things that cook quickly like yellowfin tuna steaks,veal scollopini & if your boat has a decent oven go for chateaubriand,spatchcock, rack of lamb etc. that will roast quickly,jazz up the bisto with red wine ,mushrooms,mustard,horseradish etc. with a side of microwaved frozen veg. If you are in france the frozen food stores have a lot of pre-prepared gourmet foods. Good luck.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 2:22 AM
Don't go crazy with elegant sauces and meals with lots of prep...stick to the basics: protein, carb and veg.

For salad greens: Romain lasts a long time and Arugula does well most of the time.
Veg: Carrots, broccoli, cabbage, haricot vert, grape tomatoes will last the longest
Also think about keeping frozen spinach and tossing it with some garlic and EVOO. (Not the best, but will work for a veg towards then end of your crossing).

Curry spiced chicken breast with Moroccan Carrot/ Raisin Slaw (Lunch worthy)
Stir fry with cabbage, carrot and snow pea (and your choice of protein)...these veggies last a while in the frig
Make some pasta salads the day before you leave and re-season before serving. Serve with a grilled chicken breast.
Shrimp scampi with papardelle or fettuccine
Premade Gazpacho with jumbo shrimp skewers and a garlic crostini
Cous Cous, sundried tomatoes, olives, feta tossed in a lemon and dill vinaigrette. Serve with grilled fish (halibut, Mahi)
Whole wheat pasta, garlic, canned fire roasted diced tomatoes, sweet onion, artichoke hearts and Italian sausage (sliced), topped with fresh shaved parm regg...fast and delicious!
Bake about 15 minutes on the same baking sheet: salmon fillets with grape tomatoes and bell peppers (tossed in EVOO), salt and pepper, dill if you like and lemon slice on top...serve with rice
Premake and freeze a roasted tomato and bell pepper soup (this will freeze well)
Mushroom Risotto topped with crispy prosciutto
or
Butternut squash risotto:
http://guiltykitchen.com/2010/09/23/butternut-squash-and-bacon-risotto/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+guiltykitchen+%28Guilty+Kitchen%29
(PS...this is a good site for ideas)

Mac and Cheese with hot dogs.....just kidding

Remember....its all about the garnish!!! If it is plated in a nice presentation, you can serve just about anything especially if they are expecting crew like meals for the crossing!
While this is a very unorganized post, I hope it helped you a bit!

junior
Posted: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 5:56 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


You serve cabbage and bean dishes offshore in a small confined Box and you're just asking for conversation interrupting Blowback....the rule of thumb is Beans give you the "POWER " and cabbage adds the "Bouquet." Beware, Ive seen that COMBO stop an incoming flying fish dead in it track. As far as Lasagna...not bad, but its cooking time overheats the galley and tomato acidity effects some crew. If ya" gotta go down the Lasagna road and need to CUSTOMIZE it for an on board punter, why not give my mate Moe Betta's recipe a go. Moe only uses Barilla lasagna, follows the instructions on the back of the dam box to Da' Letter and always succeeds in adding Owner pleasing Specialness. Big Moe tells me the secret to the custom flavour is to take the empty Barilla box, feed it into a document shredder, collect the shreddings, add a bit of olive oil and garlic salt, sprinkle it over top the Lasagna then pop it into preheated oven. The cardboard shredding , once toasted , add a special, How Much did it Cost ? earthy, woody, homemade flavour . Im sure you have a shredder onboard, all captains keep em in their cabin for shredding Porno Mags.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, October 10, 2010 4:01 PM
My strategy would be to serve the Boss a huge stuffed veal chop with porcini risotto and baby asparagus spears, I would serve the rest of the table mac & Cheese and Hot Dogs.. If the man has a brain in his head, he'll get the message. Or you could just quit now and save yourself the misery!
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, October 10, 2010 5:30 PM
Hi Marianne, these guys are right - very often the Chef does not participate on watches as they have to look after everyone else. If you cant take on another watch keeper, it is the Captain's job to educate the Owner... if he is served crew meals but with nibbles and drinks on occasion and the crew going on and off watch asking after his welfare and can they get him anything, surely that counts as guest service on a crossing? It is time the Captain informed him that crossings are hard work and not a 'crew holiday'!!
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Monday, October 11, 2010 10:24 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Dear Marianne, Please be so kind to inform us of your observations and the boss's 'experience' whilst crossing the Atlantic. We wait for your entertaining account of events....
Harbiner-01
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 1:46 AM
Joined: 09/09/2010
Posts: 2


I'm curious. Does the owner plan on taking a watch?
junior
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 3:40 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Its a shame that your Owner requests SPECIAL treatment rather than signing on as a regular crew. Ask him to reconsider. The greatest, most stimulating, oceanic crossings Ive ever done had the owner onboard. In normal delivery mode a captain is obliged to take the conservative, lets get it across in one piece, approach. When the owner, the person who pays the bills , is onboard you can fearlessly put your foot on the gas and drive the yacht very hard. I have a beautiful picture of this yacht driven so hard that the wheelhouse windows are underwater. I will remember that day for the rest of my life. These once in a lifetime , stand aside or loose a limb , antics can only be performed with the owners approval.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 4:45 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


''fearlessly put your foot on the gas and drive the yacht so hard that the wheelhouse windows are underwater'' Owners approval notwithstanding this is a very unsound, reckless suggestion coming from a self proclaimed 'expert'  [removed by moderator]
junior
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010 6:02 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Gee Crusty....I even did the Double Handed Bermuda Race with the owner when he was 69 years old...first to finish in our class. Guess you could call me reckless and the owner a Dam Fool. Oh Well ...............................
 
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