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Mid-Season Start-up
Claudia C
Posted: Monday, July 12, 2010 6:48 PM
Joined: 07/07/2009
Posts: 8


Hello, I am a 26 yr old female currently living in New England, working at a Private Equity firm and looking to make a switch to yacht stew life! I was originally planning on heading to Ft. Lauderdale to look for a stew position in early October but unfortunately I can't make the move until early January. I know this is the middle of the season but I was wondering if anyone had any advice on where to go at that time. I plan on taking courses and focusing on networking between now and then but I'm not quite sure where to go if I haven't landed anything when it comes time to move. I dont have any experience but I have done a ton of waitressing/bartending and I'm currently an Executive Assistant so I believe I have the qualities that it takes. Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks! Claudia
junior
Posted: Monday, July 12, 2010 7:49 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


It shouldn't be a problem for you. Speak with a professional crew agent NOW ! and tell them who you are. This is critical, your past employment experience is unique. On a yacht your position would be Hostess, customer service. Stay clear of the position called stewardess or you will be buried in a sea of ex cocktail waitresses with long legs pushing vacuum cleaners. . . The best Hostess Ive ever had came out of customer services at a London Investment Bank. She was light years in sophistication ahead of the typical Lauderdale charter yacht stewardess when entrusted with customer relations.
Claudia C
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 8:14 PM
Joined: 07/07/2009
Posts: 8


Thank you so much for your feedback! Where should I go if I need to dockwalk/meet with crew agencies, etc that time of year? I'm trying to network as much as possible but I feel like I should have a plan in place for when I leave Boston and don't yet have a position. Will anyone be hiring that time of year? Thanks again!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 8:33 PM

I found lots of tips here.  Be sure to get in a crew house that helps you with your resume, etc.

http://americancrewhouses.com

 

 


junior
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 8:51 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


I have no idea. I'm presently sailing to Venice. What I will tell you as a captain is that if I receive twenty resumes, out of those twenty resumes will only be one candidate who has had any form of previous meaningful professional employment. Your best advised to speak with a pro crew agent and ..once again I have no idea which agent is good...then impress upon the agent that you have life skills applicable to yachting customer service. Remember, yachting and crew placements take place year round all over the world. A crew member who has the presence and skill to act as hostess is always in demand.
Claudia C
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 5:21 PM
Joined: 07/07/2009
Posts: 8


Thanks so much for all the advice. I also read on this site that the best way for a newbie to be considered while dockwalking is to come prepared to do some day work. With no experience, what advice could you give me on approaching a boat? Should I complete a stew course and gain some more knowledge before I even begin dockwalking or is that a waste of money?
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 6:48 PM
I can tell you what not to do. Don't take a rock from the quay and walk up the freshly cleaned teak on the Passerelle without taking your shoes off to put the rock on the aft deck on top a CV while the crew who spent two days scrubbing the deck to perfection watch in the camera form the crew-mess.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 6:51 PM
Don't come on Monday morning and to see the mate or chief stew (on larger boats) between 8-10 am and misrepresent your intensions; thinking you are clever just to get to see them, while they are in a meeting with the Captain and the Project manager.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 6:53 PM
Don't sleep with a crew member or make friends with an officer at the bar thinking it will get you closer to a job. It actually has the opposite effect. And if it works you definitely don't want to work on that boat.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 6:57 PM
Claudia, you can get a job on a yacht any time of the year in Florida (off season is actually easier). And forget "networking", just be yourself and commit to the industry. The rest happens naturally. It is like anything, you need passion, and the person talking to you can see that. They can also see if you are just talking to them artificially to get a job. Always be yourself. If you pretend to be someone else to get a job it will bite you in the ass later.
Henning
Posted: Tuesday, September 21, 2010 6:10 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Anonymous wrote:
Don't sleep with a crew member or make friends with an officer at the bar thinking it will get you closer to a job. It actually has the opposite effect. And if it works you definitely don't want to work on that boat.

While a good rule of thumb and true that sleeping your way into a job as a stand alone act isn't a great idea, there are exceptions. They are really two separate issues and should be addressed as such. The only real advantage yachts have over commercial is that you can have a relationship and a job at the same time and have some semblance of a normal life and do what we love to do.

Rusty Wrench
Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 12:00 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Perhaps a more direct approach which may get instant results is to offer your (professional) services by way of organising the very large amount of paperwork heaped upon the overworked and underpaid chief engineers on large motor yachts these days. We are a ruggedly handsome bunch, with a fair and unbiased work ethic, also having an excellent sense of humour and deep pockets during happy hour at the bar, and for the rest of the night too....
 
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