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Powerful yet unprofessional
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2010 2:03 PM
I want to know why the "A" typical Captain is so cocky? The industry revolves around "The Captain" and yet the majority of Captains are not very professional. I find it rather curious that a person that starts of washing boats becomes top dog. In my mind Captains have way too much power and need to looked at more closely by an outside party to make dam sure they correctly perform their jobs, are socially response and are not treating crew like dirt.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2010 5:48 PM
Perhaps you should go back a couple centuries and start there.  It sounds to me that you're the problem; if you know so many unprofessional Captains, it would appear you have experienced many jobs in a short period of time.  Washing boats and working your way to the top is the norm.  What earth are you from?

junior
Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2010 7:17 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


The industry revolves around "The Captain" ??????????? Hmmm, not quite. This industry revolves around MONEY and Captains are authorized to fire the owners cash cannon. If you need money, then you will just have to put up with whatever type of captain you fall under. But don't get all depressed....the situation is not permanent. Once this cash cannon runs out of ammo the yachting world ceases to hold orbit around the captain . Just look at Ft Lauderdale. Virtually every person you meet is called captain...the person pumping gas at the fuel dock, multitudes of yacht agents, super yacht schools, crew agents, the guy running the crew house, the guy selling deck shoes, all nostalgic for the good ole' days of power and maximum throw weight . The days when they were the center of their own universe, gaining respect by unleashing salvo after salvo from the owners loaded cash cannon, are only a memory. Feel free to kick sand in their faces.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2010 8:32 PM

They say there is a bum for every toilet seat , and that sh!t rolls down hill . In the case of yachting everything starts with the captain and how the vessel runs and how well crew performs their job is a direct outcome of the leadership and management style of the captain.

 

It comes as no surprise that good captains have good crew.

 

What defines a good yacht captain is somewhat ambiguous, because some yachts are totally private and unregulated, whereas other yachts are commercially operated and regulated.

 

Yacht captains a stuck between a rock and a hard place when it comes to managing yacht owners and their eccentric and/or naïve understanding of their responsibilities as the ship owner.

 

Far too many owners think they can do whatever they wish, whenever they wish, bend rules and demand the captain obeys their every wish.

 

In the real world ship owners, employers and employees have specific responsibilities and a duty of care towards each other that is mutually beneficial.

 

For the most part yachting is lopsided and whenever there is a cheap and unorthodoxed yacht owner there you will find an inept and incompetent captain that does as he/she is told.

 

The stigma of yachting is its irrationality and “the do as I say and not as I do mentality of many yacht captains  ”.

 

In yachting Captains work twice as hard as the rest of us because they have double standards.


Henning
Posted: Monday, July 12, 2010 11:27 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
I want to know why the "A" typical Captain is so cocky? The industry revolves around "The Captain" and yet the majority of Captains are not very professional. I find it rather curious that a person that starts of washing boats becomes top dog. In my mind Captains have way too much power and need to looked at more closely by an outside party to make dam sure they correctly perform their jobs, are socially response and are not treating crew like dirt.


I find Karma is an interesting thing. If you're being treated like dirt, have you questioned what you do/have done to deserve that? I certainly don't treat my crew like dirt, I take care of my crew and they take care of me, and we all take care of the owner who takes good care of us. I suggest you work on your own karma to improve your situation in life.

captain
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 6:51 PM
Joined: 28/10/2008
Posts: 4


from merlin, a Captain is only as great as his crew, every member of the team has a job to do, just do your job well rank means little its a team effort, and remember when when something goes wrong the captain is at fault and thats the law of the seas
bridgewatch
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 8:19 PM
Joined: 28/10/2008
Posts: 23


It is absolutely true that there is alot of unprofessionalism in this industry as far as lack of "quality" of management skills and leadership skills of captains and officers/mates. I believe that that is the issue that you are addressing. The biggest problem in our industry is the fact that many captains do not have someone looking over their should on a regular basis to keep them in check and everyone including the owner 'assumes' that since he/she has a license that they are good managers and leaders. Also there are NO required maritime courses that TEACH proper leadership and management. What has been happening is that so many are lacking in good leadership and management skills that the next generation of captains do not have enough good role models to use as a basis upon which to develop their captain abilities in respect to proper leadership and management and thus the same attitudes and lack of maturity will continue because this is what they learned from their previous experience. I have discussed this often with many industry professionals like yacht management, service providers, yard mangers, brokers, other captains, yacht insurance providers etc. and there is a consense on this...there is not enough TRUE professionalism in proper management and leadership in our captains and thus few good role models for new crew. For example, this spring in South of France I heard many times from stews interviewing for jobs tell me that captains came onto them sexually by verbally asking them (or by actions) when either in an interview or after the captains received their contact details and hounded them for a date. I was shocked! One particular week I heard it from 5 different girls about 5 different captains working in the Med. These stews were very scared to continue to search for a job because of this. The chances that me, as one individual, would hear this sort of thing so many times in such a short peroid of time leads me to believe that it is more common than we prefer to admit. And I've also been hearing of this sort of thing for years!!! This is just an example of some of the crazy things that captains get away with because they are "unchecked" with no one looking over their shoulder on a regular basis. If they are not innately a good manager or leader there is nothing in the required maritime schooling courses that teaches these things. I thus made it a point while in South of France to ask crew as I met them in different social events as to how they viewed their captain. I asked questions like: - Do you find your captain creates a good role model? Good leader, good manager? -Does he use double standards - ie. he can drink alcohol onboard but you can't? Does he want to see everyone working as a team but he does not EVER chip in some respect? -Does he thank you for a job well done? -Does he disappear in the middle of the day for hours on end and crew (even First Officer - if on a larger vessel) do not know where he is? -Does he behave in a un-leadership like fashion when not on duty? ie. get stupidly drunk in an industry social gathering or "hang" out with crew on long late night drinking nights out on the town. -Does he take the time to speak with each crew member on a fairly regular basis to show appreciation for a job well done or to communicate to all crew in regularity scheduled meetings? -Can you feel that you can confide in him for a problem you may have? - Are you some what afraid of him? Or on the other hand feel that he is your "buddy"? (both of these is a no no for a captain) -Does he exude a "superior" type of mannerism rather than a "respectful leadership" type of manerism. On the other hand does he try to be everybodys best friend and thus he becomes wish washy about his role as a leader and mentor and thus he strength in a command position becomes jepordized. (both a no no for a captain) -Does he emphasize and implement regularitly scheduled safety drills? The answers I received over and over again were , no, no no, no on..... to Junior, You obviously have a chip on your shoulder about captains in South Florida who you seem to think are ALL American because your posts for years have expressed this. You do not take into considertion the FACT that MOST of the captains worldwide are NOT American and a great many of these foreign captains ARE in South Florida and many come here on a regular basis as well. So please stop this anti American stuff it is very Unprofessional ;.) The entire industy worldwide has this problem.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 1:38 AM
Unless the master's ticket is for "unlimited tonnage," they are just an overpaid cabin boy. A first year ship cadet has more knowledge and leadership skills than a typical yacht "captain."
Marsh Vegas
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 7:08 AM
Joined: 14/07/2010
Posts: 5


Overpaid Cabin Boy, I can see why you posted that one anonymously. The easiest way to find yourself a good Yacht Captain, is to find one who not only works long term for an owner, but also keeps his/her crew long term.
Few people are willing to put up with substandard managers for long. Vegas.



Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 7:47 AM
I got a bad reference from a Captain once and it cost me a good job oppotunity. What bothered me the most about the bad reference was the fact this particular Captain had been fired from the yacht and had a track record for being sacked. It's about time this industry realized that not all Captains can trusted and what they say and record on documents. When ever I am at a boat show I see the same washed out Captains running boats and circulating between jobs. I imagine these Captains network themselves at the more notorious yachty bars and with the brokers looking for bus drivers and boat sitters.
Marsh Vegas
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 8:59 AM
Joined: 14/07/2010
Posts: 5


There are a couple of common threads amongst the Anonymous message senders in this forum;
1) They all seem to have a grievance, feel they have been unfairly treated and in some cases dismissed.
2) They cannot spell or punctuate.
Get back to washing boats, or start taking responsibility for your opinions.
Vegas.

Capt Kaj
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 10:18 AM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


Unfortunately you can have people do all nature of training courses such as people skills, management, communication, organisation etc etc but sadly it has to come from within the individual. I have to say the bad eggs we are all suffering from and talking about won´t be changed by any of these fine courses. The industry has a plague on its hands, it is a plague of idiots and unprofessionals and it won´t be getting any better in the near future at all. 4 stripes doesn´t give you brains, but it often gives the holder brawn. No, these people could never be able to survive in the real world, society would eat them up. Sadly they are able to hide onboard yachts quite successfully.

I suggest to the girls that have been harassed sexually by ugly over weight hormonally challenged misfits in society otherwise known as yacht Captains, jumped up empire building alcoholic thieves, to inform all the crew agents and brokers they can in the industry about these losers by name. I believe in NAME and SHAME tactics and then see how long their antics remain. Crew can also help by not putting up with Captains stupid behaviour.  He will only get away with things if he´s permitted to but if he lives in a bullet proof castle where he´s untouchable then he´ll get away with it. Tell the owner, tell the agent, tell the broker tell everyone what a mongrel the guy is......

Now on the other foot, and there´s always another side to the story! CREW. Also a nightmare. From a Captains point, MY SIDE, I struggle to find professional crew able to meet my standards onboard. The industry is also lacking in crew that understand that crewing in the professional yachting industry is a serious business and not just a lark where they get laid by a different Stew (or deckie) every other day, roll up pissed every night, turn out for work late because they slept through their alarm and spend all day texting their mates on other yachts. They expect fast internet onboard 24/7 so they can facebook their mates, telling them how much money they don´t earn and how bad the Captain and Mate or Chief Stew´are because they are always getting pulled up because of thier lack of work ethics and having to repeat things 5 times. Again, many of the crew in this industry are NOT PROFESSIONAL beings. They also see that they can hide from the real world. If they are lucky, and many of them are, they can find fellow crew and Captains that are of a similar ilk, hence the rot continues......

Capt Kaj


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 10:57 AM
A captain after hiring a short term stewardess during a yard period decided it would be good to woo her and start dating her without the rest of the crew knowing, nothing wrong with this right. Everyone need a love life. Then after having holidays with this junior stew decided to bring her aboard at the start of an Atlantic crossing, without telling the crew. (lets also take into account that she had been fired twice from her position because of poor performance) So after having a bulletproof, unquestioned job role as a screwardess and not being needed or able to assist the already fully crewed vessel just started hanging out and sunbathing and drinking champagne in the Jacuzzi with her new found and encouraged (by the captain) guest friends who wanted to do the crossing. This decision has led to a 300% turnover in crew for this boat since this situation, and the couple in mention still remain. I think this is a perfect example of abuse of power that affects all the crew and owner alike.
Clive C-W
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 11:46 AM
Joined: 25/09/2008
Posts: 12


For an industry where no-one, not even us Captains, does anything remotely important to anyone but the extremely wealthy, there are a lot of very strong opinions on how we should or should not do this ridiculous job. 
If you don't like it, go and become a doctor,a nurse, an aid worker, a policeman, run a business - do somethoing useful with your life! 
Other than trying to keep the oceans of the world safe for the real professionals who use it form those who just play on it, even Captains are not importan, so what on earth is all the fuss about?  Take pride in being a professional in this silly world for your own sanity, but just enjoy it or move on. 
OK, yes, I hate the lack of professionalism in many parts of the industry, but that's because I used to do a job that did matter.  Now I don't, so it's just down to personal pride.

Henning
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 2:05 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
Unless the master's ticket is for "unlimited tonnage," they are just an overpaid cabin boy. A first year ship cadet has more knowledge and leadership skills than a typical yacht "captain."

PMSL, define typical, I may or may not agree. As for "Unlimited" rating meaning anything, no, that doesn't mean anything either. I know plenty of unlimited masters who are complete drunks, about the same frequency as in the yachting side of things. Also know a unlimited master who knocked a drilling rig askew, I had to fly out and relieve him. No, the size of the ticket has no real bearing on the person holding it.

Henning
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 2:31 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Capt Kaj wrote:

Unfortunately you can have people do all nature of training courses such as people skills, management, communication, organisation etc etc but sadly it has to come from within the individual. I have to say the bad eggs we are all suffering from and talking about won´t be changed by any of these fine courses. The industry has a plague on its hands, it is a plague of idiots and unprofessionals and it won´t be getting any better in the near future at all.

CREW. Also a nightmare. From a Captains point, MY SIDE, I struggle to find professional crew able to meet my standards onboard.

Capt Kaj

 It ain't just the yacht industry, it's humanity wide. Captain is just another mid upper tier management position that also happens to require some skill at managing energy as well as people. Most offices world wide have poor managers running city or district level offices poorly in their little fiefdom. Nothing special about yachting there. It's the same everywhere. You also have a share of really good ones. For both captains and crew it's really the same. One thing I have noticed in my 25 years in the maritime industries is that good captains and good crew get hooked up and then life is really a pretty cool thing from both the captains perspective and the crew's. For the beginners at all this, you want the scuttlebutt of what boats have very low crew turnover. Those are the boats that you want to get on, those are the boats where everybody is happy. Personally, I find, especially with yachts, but also with workboat companies, that it all starts with the owner. The owner sets the tone for the whole operation. There are plenty of bad yacht owners out there like there are plenty of bad business owners and CEOs out there. A good owner gets a good captain who gets a good crew. It's a symbiotic relationship where everybody takes care of everybody. It's all about your own karma. I'm a captain, we have a permanent crew of 6 and everybody has been here over a year and no one is thinking about quitting. Life is pretty good over here all things considered.

If you work in a s-t situation, consider working on your own karma, because most people do in the long run get what they deserve.


Henning
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 2:39 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Clive C-W wrote:
For an industry where no-one, not even us Captains, does anything remotely important to anyone but the extremely wealthy, there are a lot of very strong opinions on how we should or should not do this ridiculous job. 
If you don't like it, go and become a doctor,a nurse, an aid worker, a policeman, run a business - do somethoing useful with your life! 
Other than trying to keep the oceans of the world safe for the real professionals who use it form those who just play on it, even Captains are not importan, so what on earth is all the fuss about?  Take pride in being a professional in this silly world for your own sanity, but just enjoy it or move on. 
OK, yes, I hate the lack of professionalism in many parts of the industry, but that's because I used to do a job that did matter.  Now I don't, so it's just down to personal pride.


With your attitude, you should really get out of the business, and I mean right now. You are responsible for the lives under your charge, and it is a professional responsibility, you are being paid for it. It is more than just the lives of the rich, it's also the lives of the crew and the lives of working guys on docks and in other boats. If a surgeon makes a mistake, he only kills one person. If I make a mistake, heck I can kill several or even better if I f- it up real good. This might only be a yacht that sleeps 16 people, but she's a damned heavy piece of steel with a good bit of energy behind it. If you don't think any of that matters, quit right f-ing now.

Henning
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 2:48 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


It's funny how many whiny miserable people inhabit this board. Ever consider your own negativity may be the problem?

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 3:59 PM
Henning, please, you are not seriously comparing yourself as a small boat Captain of 6 to a Surgeon and other professional. Your logic is flawed. You are forgetting that a Doctor proactively SAVES lives daily. Also, other professions need to produce, make a profit to survive. A Captain does not. Clive C-W makes some valid and realistic points. As does whoever initiated this post. These cowboy Captains get away with acting like clowns primarily because the rich owner usely has little or no knowledge of yachting. However, in their business world they could easily identify an incompetent employee and fire them as they understand the complexities of the job. Therefore, some Captains exploit this, simple as that, so let's be realistic.
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 4:30 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
Henning, please, you are not seriously comparing yourself as a small boat Captain of 6 to a Surgeon and other professional. Your logic is flawed. You are forgetting that a Doctor proactively SAVES lives daily. Also, other professions need to produce, make a profit to survive. A Captain does not. Clive C-W makes some valid and realistic points. As does whoever initiated this post. These cowboy Captains get away with acting like clowns primarily because the rich owner usely has little or no knowledge of yachting. However, in their business world they could easily identify an incompetent employee and fire them as they understand the complexities of the job. Therefore, some Captains exploit this, simple as that, so let's be realistic.

Not forgetting, that just doesn't count as a real positive in my book, neutral at best. By proactively saving lives everyday for a living the doctor is also contributing to global over population and the inevitable degrading of the quality of existence followed by extinction that will have to come with it. That's not really the best way to rate the importance of a person though, by what job they hold. I actively save between 6 and 16 lives every day by not f-ing up, potentially more. It's all the same, everybody's input matters pretty much the same as the next. All it takes is for anyone to screw up in any of myriad opportunities provided to each of us daily, and we can have enormous impact on many peoples lives. Regardless of what one does for a living one has to realize the importance of doing what we do correctly. The kid flipping burgers can kill you as well. Should they not take food hygiene seriously because they're just flipping burgers? That minimum wage employee has the ability to impact a lot more lives than any doctor in a day that's for sure.


BTW, If you think it's easy to fire an incompetent employee you should be on the lecture circuit to teach HR managers world wide how to do it, you'll be able to afford as nice of a yacht as you desire.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 5:18 PM
Henning you do not ACTIVELY SAVE LIVES on a regular basis. You at best take precautionary measures on a regular basis to avoid SAVING LIVES. There is a big difference. Based on your logic above, I guess you consider yourself to be a contributor to global over population? Sounds a bit contradictory and negative to me.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 10:20 PM
After spending some of my valuable time reading the opinions above, I understood better now, why every yacht captain I met is against the increase of regulations in the industry and also why they don't like to have experienced professional mariners (MM) on board their yachts. Unfortunately look like everybody in this industry is happy with the big circus where the crews are puppets at the hands of the wild beasts who are the owners and where "some" captains see them selves on beast side, but they are nothing more than clowns to amuse the beasts. I'm sorry, but the more I know about the industry, the further away I want to stay.
tubby
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 10:41 PM
Joined: 19/02/2009
Posts: 11


STOP PICKING ON HENNING! Haven't we all learned tons from him, I mean really he takes the time every e-issue to weigh in on tons and tons and tons of subjects, almost as if he had nothing better to do. I mean seriously, its not as if he just wants to post for the sake of posting or so we will think he is something more than the humble, hard working gent that he is. SO please a little respect. (no curtsy necessary, right H?)
now about those captains. hmmm, mine is 20 years in and makes McGyver look like a cub scout going after his first merit badge./
entitled? yes. so what. Professional? Not always. So what. You either respect the Captain for whom you work or you don't. If you don't, all things being equal, QUIT! Westmarine needs someone to stock the shelves!

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 11:03 PM
I have worked in the yachting for 16 years. Every captain I met has dated or been in a relationship with someone (crew) on board. In my opinion, most captains, feel that since they drive the ship they have control over everything. I also see functioning alcoholics, is a pre requisite for a captain. I usually do not post things but I have seen this over and over again. If the captains followed their own rules, crews would get along better and stay longer. Most captains don't really face up to the owners either. What I have see is to the owners they are the Yes man..... Captains, go back to school and get a reality check.
14Freedom
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 4:07 AM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


I actively save between 6 and 16 lives every day by not f-ing up, potentially more.

Jesus should be your name, Henning. As is Jesus F*@*ing Christ. You are our savior.

ATB-
The Slacker

Chief
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 12:53 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"... the doctor is also contributing to global over population and the inevitable degrading of the quality of existence..."

Ach mein Gott, Herr Henning. Tell us on whose lederhosened lap you learned your eugenics lessons. The last time I read something like your comment, it was written on an early 1930s German campaign poster.

And I saved 30 lives yesterday by not getting drunk and driving my car into a Greyhound bus on the freeway.

Haya
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 1:47 PM
Joined: 02/04/2010
Posts: 19


LOL...This whole page is hilarious...  :D

Henning
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 3:55 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Chief wrote:
"... the doctor is also contributing to global over population and the inevitable degrading of the quality of existence..."

Ach mein Gott, Herr Henning. Tell us on whose lederhosened lap you learned your eugenics lessons. The last time I read something like your comment, it was written on an early 1930s German campaign poster.

And I saved 30 lives yesterday by not getting drunk and driving my car into a Greyhound bus on the freeway.


Reading comprehension 101 Chief, I did not advocate eugenics, in fact my statement allowed for a natural conclusion of the species. Just because a fact isn't pretty does not make it any less real. Look at the state of fresh water depletion vs. population growth combined with the lack/cost of growing energy consumption, and the conclusion is pretty simple, we will populate ourselves out of existence, and the growth of population increased exponentially with the discovery of antibiotics and the immunization against many childhood diseases, and for that, doctors are responsible. There is a Yin and a Yang to everything including saving lives for a living, that's why I rate it as a neutral.

As far as you saving lives by not getting drunk and running into people, that's exactly correct and my point. Regardless of how important or unimportant you feel your position in life is, everyone makes decisions which can impact others.

Clive C-W
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 12:08 PM
Joined: 25/09/2008
Posts: 12


Oh Henning, do get over yourself.  Bad day the office by any chance? A bus driver and a train driver are responsible for a lot more lives than us every day and they don't get airs and graces (or wear stripes).  I do recognize that we need to do a proper job in running a ship, I do take my responsibility for ship and peoples safety seriously. But I just don't see why you and others get so excited with eachother about it.  I really kick myself for even joining in

Septic tank
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 12:45 PM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


I've seen the best and worst of this business over the years and come to realize that it's virtually impossible to find the perfect situation. They say the bad odors of a dead fish starts at the head, and this philosophy can be applied to yachts because everything starts and ends with the Captain. Being a good captain in yachting is to be above average. I am sick off panic merchants, yes men and captains with substance addiction problems.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 2:19 PM
Clive, you are a welcome breath of fresh air. How much pomposity can this industry sustain?
c.meaway
Posted: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 2:57 AM
Joined: 03/02/2009
Posts: 5


Speaking as someone who came into this industry in my late 30s after working in several others, I have not seen behavior this unprofessional in many places. Well, maybe in one other position.

I've been on 4 boats -
1. First experience with a captain in this industry was with a sociopath. Liked to scream and swear at you, among other things: "WHAT THE -*- IS WRONG WITH YOU??? PICK THAT UP OR I'LL SHOVE IT UP YOUR ***!" (140+ ft gorgeous new m/y with several long-term, tyrannized crew..)

2. This guy was just lazy- not an evil guy, just a mediocre one. Liked to take four hour naps all afternoon and get up just in time to eat what the chef was cooking. The longer I go on, the more I wish this wasn't just a seasonal job, because at least he wasn't evil. Alas, a beautiful boat, no longer on the water. 

3. The captain of this 160+ well known M/Y hired me (I soon realized) because he was horny. Showed up behind me on regular basis, giving unsolicited back rubs and making comments about my so called "sexiness," embarrassing the crap out of me in front of my new crewmates. After four months of "not warming up" to his advances and trying to maintain a "distant but friendly" relationship, he got so pissed off he fired me. He told his mate I reminded him of his horrible wife. (Yes... he was a newlywed.) Sad because crew got along really well, all were competent professionals and work was done well. I came away with several glowing letters of recommendation. This boat was well-managed thanks to the super-professional / competent mate. However, even he couldn't take the captains rude behaviour and finally left. Only 2 of that great crew are still on the boat; all gone because of that captain's unprofessional, hyprocritical, puerile, irresponsible behavior.

4. Wet/ damp/ mold under my bunk (Captain says: "Wow. I wonder what that could be from?") and 10+ year old water tank that had never been cleaned. Spent almost six months with "intestinal issues" in a damp bed. Never occurred to anyone to have the tank cleaned. Never occurred to anyone in charge to do much, really. Maddeningly "laid back."

Would you have stayed on any of these boats?

I got into yachting because a friend, who was a captain ten years ago, said it would be the best time of my life, but I'm still looking for that professional, hardworking, respectful crew with a good leader. I refuse to believe that it's my own fault. All this talk of karma. I think that's actually part of the problem- not holding each individual responsible for his/ her own behavior and performance. Every boat starts out great and then the madness begins and you realize you've walked into another fiasco. But I'll keep doing it for a little while because I love boats, being on the water and I still have a little hope left that there is a good boat out there. 

rwoods3942
Posted: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 2:14 AM
Joined: 26/11/2008
Posts: 9


Chief I like how you shoot down Henning in most of these posts- I run a large yacht with 10 crew and keep most of them a long time. Chartering here in the Med is very hard work and reading all of these whining unemployed and unemployable people on anchor watch gets to be boring. Henning you are an idiot, you have an opinion on everything and seem to feel that you are the Dear Abby of Dockwalk even when you are completely just pulling this stuff right out of you ass. I wont post anonymous, I run a yacht called Paramour 142' CMN, my name is Captain Ron Woods. The bridge resourse management quote on the last blog was hilarious. Henning my advise to you is do your research before to be the authority on everything, otherwise I agree with chief- we are going to refer on my boat Hennings when people think they know what they are talking about and just pull stuff straight out of their ass
 
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