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Oil Spill Leads to Suicide
Janine
Posted: Thursday, July 1, 2010 9:11 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 386


According to the Dallasnews.com, on Wednesday, June 24, Capt. William Allen Kruse of a 50-foot custom sport boat committed suicide as a result of extreme stress caused by the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The Dallasnews.com reports, “…friends of Kruse, 55, said they suspect that the oil spill weighed heavily on him.”

‘How can you deal with watching the oil kill every damn thing you ever lived for in your whole life?’ said Ty Fleming, a land-bound charter captain who spoke Wednesday afternoon at the Undertow bar in Orange Beach, Ala.”

Capt. Kruse was recruited to work for BP as part of the cleanup effort. Dallasnews.com says that his suicide is a reminder of the mental and emotional burden resulting from the oil spill.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/DN-oildeaths_24tex.ART.State.Edition2.297b027.html


Anonymous
Posted: Friday, July 2, 2010 6:54 PM
There is a crushing feeling of sadness and helplessness that is felt when you see the death and destruction in the Gulf of Mexico. Deep felt and seething anger and frustration follows. If you have ever spent time along the gulf coast, this has been in the making for years. Its stunning beauty was surrounded by polluting industry. Our oceans, lakes, rivers, mountains and all of the species contained within, have been raped and pillaged for generations. Whether for fish, gold, oil, coal, gas and the profits they yield, the people who benefit from its destruction have been give carte blanche to do as they please. The "tree huggers" of the world have been ignored, reviled and persecuted as "Chicken Littles" Even today they would have you believe that things must be allowed to continue as is. It is time for protest! Oh....thats right....the boss owns an oil company and a coal mine and lumber mills and gas and electric stock and....holy crap. I need my yacht job. Oh well, never mind.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, July 2, 2010 8:59 PM

32,767 suicides in the USA in 2005.

Let's not overreact. There are more newsworthy items than this........

The earrth will recover. Throughout history- all 4.6 billion years of the earth - things have been more difficult and we have survived.......

Drama is for daytime TV


Dave
Posted: Friday, July 2, 2010 11:17 PM
Joined: 22/06/2008
Posts: 18


He commited suicide because of the oil spill? Seriously? What on earth would that achieve? Does it make him feel better? Does it make me feel better? Does it make you feel better? What does it achieve? How about the investors in BP that have lost 100 billion dollars? Do they feel better? As far as I am concerned, no one feels better except the captain who replaced him.

Extreme stress, my ass. Ty Flemming a land bound charter captain...... what the hell is that? Junior, Henning, you are bright guys, help us out here...... he is speaking live at the Undertow bar in Alabama............. the next clown talks about the mountains along the coast............ eh? What am I missing?


Henning
Posted: Saturday, July 3, 2010 4:32 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


What did the Buddhist monk achieve setting himself on fire protesting the Vietnam war? WTF knows why he did it.... As for investors in BP, I don't personally feel sorry for them at all. If they had done just a bit of due diligence before investing, they would have noticed that BP has by far the worst safety record in the industry and with a record like they had, this was just a matter of time in coming.

Capt Kaj
Posted: Monday, July 5, 2010 4:02 PM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


I would imagine the guy was close to the edge anyway. We all have different tolerances to life, stress and depression, something was obviously needed to tip him over the edge and the BP oil spill was it. It is a sad situation no doubt which isn´t going to go away for a long time.

A HUGE shake up is needed to the oil industry, ie a network of massive oil catching ships with booms able to catch and channel oil into tanks with massive oily water separators able to be dispatched anywhere at anytime in the world where they are required. This isn´t the first nor the last oil spill either from a rig or tanker. It could have been any other company, it was BP´s turn this time. On the other hand, the world has a massive thirst for oil, just about everything we make needs oil in some shape or form, it is a numbers game, the more you need the more risks are taken to suck it out. So before the next spill, the oil industry and govenments must set up the network to cope with disasters like this one so cock ups like this one are better controlled and even prevented in future. BP in the future should stand for Be Prepared.....

Capt Kaj


sizzler2008
Posted: Thursday, July 8, 2010 10:08 AM
Joined: 26/10/2008
Posts: 4


Henning,
I cannot let your comments pass without reply. Usually I respect your comments but this time you are in correct. I work on yachts but have been working as an engineer on a rescue tug out of Gibraltar facilitating crew and provision transfer in the straits of Gib. Our work is high risk and we are at the mercy of ships crews who operate the cranes etc. Whenever we go alongside a BP vessel to transfer cargo they are by far the most highly trained and efficent crew, who follow safety procedures to the letter. It has saddened me that this has happened to BP. As in my experiance they are the one of the few company's really put into practice safe working regulations. They have been let down by a sub contractor.  I'm sorry but I think your comments are unfair and unfounded. I would like you to produce the proof you have that states "BP has the worst safety record in the industry".

rodsteel
Posted: Thursday, July 8, 2010 6:17 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 275


sizzler2008,

 

According to published congressional testimony, it was BP personnell that dictated the change in order of the procedures usually followed to place a cement plug deep in the well (i.e., removing the mud before installing the plug instead of after installing the plug as is sop - in order to save 12 hours or so of on-site processing time I believe). The personnell of at least two of the subcontractors (TransOcean and Halliburton) objected but were over-ruled by the local BP staff (aided and abetted by the federal regulatory agency, btw).

 

Rod

 


Chief
Posted: Friday, July 9, 2010 12:47 AM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


sizzler2008 wrote:
Whenever we go alongside a BP vessel to transfer cargo they are by far the most highly trained and efficent crew, who follow safety procedures to the letter.


BP's oil exploration and production sides are not BP tanker operations, they are different people and cultures altogether so don't confuse the standards of one with the other. Having served as an engineer officer on BP crude oil tankers I will attest to the very high standards demanded of the company. They more or less rewrote the book on tanker operations post Exxon Valdez.

However, BP's drilling and oil production performance is better than some and worse than others, they are not the worst and they are far from the best. There are different aims and different levels of training and oversight between BP oil shipping and BP drilling.

junior
Posted: Friday, July 9, 2010 10:37 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


BP has plenty to answer for. BP s safety culture .http://www.propublica.org/article/years-of-internal-bp-probes-warned-that-neglect-could-lead-to-accidents
sizzler2008
Posted: Sunday, July 11, 2010 11:07 PM
Joined: 26/10/2008
Posts: 4


Cheif, Thanks for your post, and pointing out the differences. I kind off felt for the guy's at BP after having alot of contact with their superintendants and surveyour's. I just felt like I had to make a post after seeing some ill informed people making such brutal statements. Unlike these people, I can only comment from my own experiences. And in my experience we always breathed a sigh of releif when it was a BP vessel we where working with. When I think of some of the heart stopping moments we have had working alongside Chineese vessels.... Im suprised that high regard for procedure and safety isn't extended through to the drilling platforms, but I will take your word for it. Thanks again for your reply.
Henning
Posted: Monday, July 12, 2010 11:11 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


sizzler2008 wrote:
Henning,
I cannot let your comments pass without reply. Usually I respect your comments but this time you are in correct. I work on yachts but have been working as an engineer on a rescue tug out of Gibraltar facilitating crew and provision transfer in the straits of Gib. Our work is high risk and we are at the mercy of ships crews who operate the cranes etc. Whenever we go alongside a BP vessel to transfer cargo they are by far the most highly trained and efficent crew, who follow safety procedures to the letter. It has saddened me that this has happened to BP. As in my experiance they are the one of the few company's really put into practice safe working regulations. They have been let down by a sub contractor.  I'm sorry but I think your comments are unfair and unfounded. I would like you to produce the proof you have that states "BP has the worst safety record in the industry".


That's tanker ops, whole different things. I've worked on their operations and exploitations projects, they do have one of if not the worst safety record, not only from my experience working on their projects, but also by the record of OSHA and MMS violations and fines. As I said, a bit of due diligence proves it all out. The BP company man tried to have me run off a jack up boat one time for refusing to jack down in conditions too rough to jack down in (we would have turned over), my company backed my call though.

Salvador
Posted: Tuesday, July 13, 2010 10:52 AM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxDf-KkMCKQ&feature=player_embedded#!

 


 
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