Welcome to the Dockwalk.com Forum

 

In order to post a comment in one of the forum topics, you must log in or sign up. Your display name will appear next to your posts unless you check the Post Anonymously box. When writing a post, please follow our forum guidelines. If you come across a post that you would like us to review, use the Report Post button. Please note the opinions shared in the forums do not necessarily reflect the views of Dockwalk.


RSS Feed Print
When to go to FLL Sep/Oct/Nov??
Lauren
Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 6:03 PM
Joined: 23/06/2010
Posts: 8


Hello again, just another quick question! I have been told by a few different people in the industry when to go to FLL to complete my STCW and then look for work. But i am after a more specific time frame. Should i head over at the beginning of Oct, complete the cert in first week and then start looking? Or end of Sept? Or mid Oct. Thanks again for advice, Lauren
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 6:14 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


You want to be there with STCW done and ready to work by the second week of October. Boats are either getting in town or out of refit and/or lay up by then and getting cleaned up for the boat show. If you can afford to show up earlier, it's not a bad thing.

Lauren
Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 6:20 PM
Joined: 23/06/2010
Posts: 8


Thankyou for clarification for both queries. Much appreciated.
btharris
Posted: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 9:35 PM
Joined: 06/03/2010
Posts: 6


I was planning on going down end of august and finishing course work by sept 15th and start looking halfway through september. Do you think thats too early?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 5:25 AM
Just keep in mind, that is when everyone goes to Lauderdale. Crew houses up their prices. Hurricanes are in full swing. The courses are even more expensive. Why not try during the off season. Boats don't just stop running. I have gone to Florida twice now in my career only to find jobs else where and had to leave. When everyone is in France, try Malta or Seattle. If you follow the herds you will hardly stand out and most likely get your CV binned. I was getting 12 to 20 CV's a day when we were in FLorida in Oct/Nov Every year more and more people come out to compete for less and less jobs. If you go, have a car and try Miami and West Palm too. Good luck.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 5:31 AM
PS, you dont have to go to Florida to get your STCW. You can take the 4 courses that make it up in almost any coastal town around the world, just have to do some research. It is probably cheaper too.
Henning
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 7:11 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


btharris wrote:
I was planning on going down end of august and finishing course work by Sept 15th and start looking halfway through September. Do you think that's too early?


Nope, could even work to your advantage.

Henning
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 7:18 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Anonymous wrote:
PS, you dont have to go to Florida to get your STCW. You can take the 4 courses that make it up in almost any coastal town around the world, just have to do some research. It is probably cheaper too.


Not a bad piece of advice. Many coastal cities and towns in the US even have Community Colleges where you can get it for a couple hundred dollars. The disadvantage to doing it outside a yacht industry town though is that you miss the networking opportunities. Often the schools have bulletin boards where captains come in and post a job offer, and there is a good chance you may be going through the course with some who knows someone who is looking even if the boat they are on isn't. CPR First Aid is a good course for that since you share a class with people who have been in the business for a while doing a mandated refresher. These opportunities are what make spending the extra money to do them in Ft Lauderdale or Antibes worthwhile.

junior
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:02 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Why are you even going to Ft Lauderdale ? In thirty years as captain I have never once hired a crew in Ft Lauderdale. Virtually all the quality yachts will be North in New England for sept and oct. I always hire at the end of the New England season in Newport or Maine then proceed to the Caribbean. Ft Lauderdale Is not even an option for a vast number of yachts..
ShadF
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 7:06 PM
Joined: 18/03/2009
Posts: 10


Totally disagree with Junior. If you are just finishing your STCW, then I assume you are new to yachting. Most boats already have a team in place by the time they head to New England or the Caribbean or Med. If a boat needs to replace crew mid season, they are not going to be interested in hiring someone with no experience. Same is true when starting a busy season. Boats are just way too busy to train you if you don't have experience. Your best bet is to get to Lauderdale in the Fall and do your best to break in to the industry by doing day work for boats that are either sitting at a dock in someone's back yard 40 weeks out of the year or doing a yard period or going in the boat show. Doing day work is the easiest way for someone new to make connections and get the experience that might get you a shot on a boat once it leaves for the next port of call. South Florida is one of the best places to look for day work because there are so many back-yard boats, shipyards and boat shows. If you are new, it will be real tough finding a job in the middle of a season in New England. Plus, by September New England has already started to empty out. Your odds are much better in Lauderdale if you're staying in the States to find work.
junior
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 8:28 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Shad...can you read ? Oct is the END OF THE SEASON...one more time .. SHAD !!! OCTOBER IS THE END OF THE SEASON. Good yachts do their crew changes at the end of the season in order to give new crew a few weeks to get to know the program before the winter season kicks in. In order to take advantage of this crew turnover on quality New England yachts you have got to be there. No yacht in its right mind, when en route to the Caribbean, would sail out of its way to Ft Lauderdale in order to hire a new stewardess . One common mistake is to assume that Ft Lauderdale is the center of the Yacht world....far from it. It is entirely possible that for lifestyle reasons you choose to hang out in Ft Lauderdale crew houses , clean boats and get drunk at the local yachty bars for a few months in the fall..this is your choice.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 9:59 PM
What? Summer season in New England is DONE after Labor Day, September 6th this year. It's a mass exodus. Lauren, if you first show up in Newport or Maine late September or early October looking for a job, you'll get there just in time to ask the locals why there are no yachts at the marinas. Junior obviously has some issues with Fort Lauderdale -but lots of "quality yachts" go there even if HE doesn't. If you already have plans to be in classes in until Mid-September in Fort Lauderdale then your timing should be pretty good. Lots of boats will be coming through Lauderdale doing touch up work at the yards and getting ready for the Boat Show. There will be good opportunities to network and find day work. No need to make yourself crazy and start worrying about shelling out money to travel elsewhere. Good luck.
TiffanyS
Posted: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:46 PM
Joined: 21/08/2008
Posts: 30


Lauren, there's a lot to be said for doing day work for a while and getting your bearings before you start spending a lot of money traveling or commit to a boat for a season. An STCW will make you eligible to work on a boat, but it will do little to prepare you to work on a boat. Be careful relying too heavily on information you get on the websites. You definitely don't want to get indoctrinated into the drama. These forums are fun, but they are the yachting industry's water cooler. Take what you read here with a grain of salt. Good luck.
Henning
Posted: Friday, June 25, 2010 2:39 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


junior wrote:
Why are you even going to Ft Lauderdale ? In thirty years as captain I have never once hired a crew in Ft Lauderdale. Virtually all the quality yachts will be North in New England for sept and oct. I always hire at the end of the New England season in Newport or Maine then proceed to the Caribbean. Ft Lauderdale Is not even an option for a vast number of yachts..


You are one out of hundreds of captains. I've hired plenty out of Ft Lauderdale as have many many others. Newport or Maine in Sept or Oct? Only boats still up in that area at the time are family boats of people who live there, and they are pretty much all US flagged, so unless they are Americans, that is a pretty useless suggestion.

Henning
Posted: Friday, June 25, 2010 2:54 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


junior wrote:
 Oct is the END OF THE SEASON...one more time .. SHAD !!! OCTOBER IS THE END OF THE SEASON. Good yachts do their crew changes at the end of the season in order to give new crew a few weeks to get to know the program before the winter season kicks in. In order to take advantage of this crew turnover on quality New England yachts you have got to be there. No yacht in its right mind, when en route to the Caribbean, would sail out of its way to Ft Lauderdale in order to hire a new stewardess .

October is PAST the end of the season. If you want to catch end of the season, you need to be there in August. Not all the boats there go direct to the Caribbean either. There's a good number that stop in Ft Lauderdale for a month or two doing repairs and refitting for the Carib season, and many stay in that latitude and do the season in the Bahamas. Even fewer boats stand offshore for a direct routing to the Virgin Islands.  Most boats take a coastal routing down which puts Ft Lauderdale directly on their route. Most people go down behind the islands. There are also many vessels that come from the Med on Dockwise or similar along with those that come on their own bottoms. A large percentage unload or make port in Ft Lauderdale for clean up and fitout for the upcoming season. You may not like the "floating gin palaces" but the reality is, they are the majority of the yachts where a green crew will find a berth. When I run a big boat, I can afford bunk space for green crew in training. On smaller boats, it's not so easy to afford because I need everyone to know their job and someone else's because I'm limited in crew berths. Can't really "hot rack" yacht crew.

You may not like the fact that Ft Lauderdale is the hub of the yacht industry, but it is. It's not the only place to go, but it is the prime for that time of the year, and also holds more "out of season opportunity" than any place else.

Henning
Posted: Friday, June 25, 2010 3:04 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


TiffanyS wrote:
Lauren, there's a lot to be said for doing day work for a while and getting your bearings before you start spending a lot of money traveling or commit to a boat for a season. An STCW will make you eligible to work on a boat, but it will do little to prepare you to work on a boat. Be careful relying too heavily on information you get on the websites. You definitely don't want to get indoctrinated into the drama. These forums are fun, but they are the yachting industry's water cooler. Take what you read here with a grain of salt. Good luck.

Ain't that the truth.... There are plenty of good Stew courses out there and advertised, but I don't see any for deck training. Basics like how to secure properly to a cleat and tie a few basic knots. Basic radar interpretation, how to run a buffer and do small paint repairs with AwlGrip. Basics of varnishing and brush care (you have no idea how many good brushes I've had to spend a lot of time repairing or had to throw away over the years because people didn't know how to care for them). How to care for a teak deck without 2 parting it every 2 weeks.... Stuff like that.

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, June 25, 2010 11:24 PM
Yes Fort Lauderdale is the place to do your STCW even though it is more expensive because of the networking possibilities and also you can go straight to dayworking when you are finished with the class.  I am new to the industry and was living in St. Thomas at the time I was searching for a job. For months I was networking and applying online with crew agencies......and that got me absolutely nowhere because you cant join a boat in the middle of the season as green crew and the crew agents really wont put you forward for jobs until they have met you. Bottom line, you really need to be in the area that all of the yachts are currently in....which will be Fort Lauderdale at that time. So don't listen to most of the crap that has been posted (except the one about being there around October)......just go to Fort Lauderdale, sign up with crew agents (make sure they know you and your face VERY WELL), take the STCW, do daywork, dockwalk and that is how you will find a job for the Caribbean season.

And the sooner you get to Fort Lauderdale, the better your chances of finding a boat that you will fit well with!! (because crew will be coming back in full throttle looking for jobs!!) There is a lot of crew without jobs in the Med right now and be sure that they are all going to be coming to Fort Lauderdale looking for jobs for the Car. season!!!!

Claudia C
Posted: Tuesday, June 29, 2010 9:14 PM
Joined: 07/07/2009
Posts: 8


Hello, I am a 26 yr old female in Boston looking to get a job as a stewardess on a motor yacht in a few months. This is the schedule I had planned so far: Take the STCW95 in Newport Sept 13-17, then head down to Ft. Lauderdale the week of October 4th to dock walk, meet with crew agencies and hopefully get some day work. Since I'll have a couple weeks in between, are there any other courses you suggest that could help my chances? I've worked in a number of restaurants (formal and casual) and I've been an Executive's Assitant for 5 years. I also have a degree in International Relations. I love the service industry and traveling. Do you think it's a stretch for me to get a job since I don't have any real experience? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! Claudia
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 6:20 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Claudia C wrote:
Hello, I am a 26 yr old female in Boston looking to get a job as a stewardess on a motor yacht in a few months. This is the schedule I had planned so far: Take the STCW95 in Newport Sept 13-17, then head down to Ft. Lauderdale the week of October 4th to dock walk, meet with crew agencies and hopefully get some day work. Since I'll have a couple weeks in between, are there any other courses you suggest that could help my chances? I've worked in a number of restaurants (formal and casual) and I've been an Executive's Assitant for 5 years. I also have a degree in International Relations. I love the service industry and traveling. Do you think it's a stretch for me to get a job since I don't have any real experience? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! Claudia


Do you know "Silver Service"? If not, that would make a class for you. Floral Arrangement and wine courses are also available that if you don't have the info can be helpful as well as the networking opportunities. Remember, the best jobs in the yacht industry are like everywhere else. They are word of mouth only. Crew Agents never see the good jobs because nobody has trouble filling the good jobs. If a crew agent has the listing to crew a boat, you can rest assured, it's most likely not a prime job.

Claudia C
Posted: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 3:26 PM
Joined: 07/07/2009
Posts: 8


Great advice...time to start networking. Thank you!!
 
 Average 0 out of 5