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Deckhand Dies in Fall
Janine
Posted: Thursday, June 10, 2010 10:17 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 392


A source reports that a deckhand was killed on M/Y Dubai several weeks ago in Port Rashid, Dubai. Reportedly he was on the helipad doing a wash down, leaning over the port side when the welding on the helipad railing gave way. He fell, hitting a fender, which bounced him onto the corner of the concrete dock, killing him.

The 162-meter yacht is the royal yacht of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum of Dubai. It changed hands during the build and was launched by  Platinum Yachts of the UAE. There is currently an investigation to find the contractors responsible for the welds on the helipad railings.

Crew on the sister vessels M/Y Dubawi and M/Y Dubai Shadow attended a ceremony for the crewmember. 


Bluewater
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 8:51 AM
Joined: 30/03/2010
Posts: 11


our sincere condolences to the deckhands family, friends and fellow crew...
Tiago Balsini
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 12:42 PM
Joined: 02/05/2010
Posts: 6


My condolences for the family too.
Heli-Yacht International
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 4:57 PM
Joined: 12/10/2008
Posts: 3


This is terrible news! Our prayers go out to the family and crew from Heli-Yacht

Tedd Greenwald
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 5:05 PM
Joined: 26/09/2009
Posts: 8


Horrible news, my condolences to the family and friends. It's a good lesson to all of us who walk on slippery surfaces high above the deck and dock. I'm going to be extra careful in my washdowns now. Still when a structure gives way like this it's an accident and hard to prevent. I had a folding step break and then fell on a tool box breaking a few vertebrae when I landed on a tool box after bouncing off a clothes washing machine in the forepeak of a yacht.
Cassandra Vitale
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 5:20 PM
Joined: 10/11/2008
Posts: 2


so scary! condolences to all involved. 
i fell during a washdown a few weeks ago, from abt 14 ft up onto a concrete fuel dock, and luckily just busted my arm and bruised my heels.  3 wks out, i've had 2 surgeries on my radius and soft tissues (and am the proud owner of 7 screws and a plate) and still my heels are uncomfortable to walk on.  that was my safety wake up though.  glad my accident happened in a way - reminded me to respect danger more (even at the dock). 


(sorry for no caps, typing one handed)

Richard clarke
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 6:08 PM
Joined: 03/02/2010
Posts: 1


With sincere condolences to his family, friends and fellow crew members through out the yachting industry, but safety is of paramount importance, maybe all of us that have fallen off a deck should learn by this and wear a harness.
Henning
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 9:09 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


That really sucks. I wonder who classified and did the construction survey on it.

Henning
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 9:15 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Richard clarke wrote:
With sincere condolences to his family, friends and fellow crew members through out the yachting industry, but safety is of paramount importance, maybe all of us that have fallen off a deck should learn by this and wear a harness.



Yeah, but what do you do when the anchor point for the harness breaks off the boat? This isn't a slip and fall accident, this is a structural failure of a helipad. The nature of a helipad precludes having something overhead to clip to.... This was a serious failure by multiple parties. It will be interesting to see the root cause analysis on this. My bet is insufficient gas shielding during welding which left it with a porous weld.

Mike
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2010 11:17 PM
Joined: 08/07/2009
Posts: 1


Terrible news! My condolences to crew, family and friends. It really hits home though, I have done the same thing but luckily smaller boat. Split the face open 4 broken bone in foot and broken nose. It is (although a sad event) a gooder reminder to the notion "safety first" even though it was a structural fault.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 12:06 AM
My deepest condolences to all the family and friends. However, it has reminded me of an incident that didnt happen too long ago on a private yacht that myself and partner were working on... he was a decky and we had guests on and he was required to wash the boat down (at night by himself.)..and when it came to washing those areas hard to reach.. basicly hanging on for dear life as there were no harnesses on board for safety. We soon found out how unsafe the boat really was and it was MCA also... I could go on and on about what else was going on also..Why do innocent hard working people have to be the ones who pay with their lives for those who are negligent...it always comes down to the MIGHTY EURO/Dollar or whatever the currency..
junior
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 6:59 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


When crew sign onto these Mega yachts they no longer operate in the gentle world of yachting , they are working in an industrial environment. I watch young guys cleaning these enormous motor yachts and very rarely see them wearing a harness. Did this deckhand have a harness on ? And if he did, was his lanyard dead ended to a proper strong point ? That a "weld Broke" sounds like a fishy cover up to avoid procedural liability . If crew are not familiar with comfortable working harness's, these are best available , the soft webbing attchment point avoids awlgrip scratching . http://www.spinlock.co.uk/productitem.asp?pc=DW-DPH&l=deckware&t=Deckpro Harness Another accident waiting to happen is during tender hoist, launch maneuvers. Hard hats, gloves and robust work boots, standard industrial personal safety gear, are unheard of in yachting. A handheld vhf, blocking chock or loose mooring gear falling 15 meters on your head will cause grief.
markcorkin
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 9:25 AM
Joined: 03/06/2010
Posts: 1


A tragic thing to happen, thoughts go to the family at this time
Planet Massage & Chef Mark Lohmann
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 10:21 AM
Joined: 23/05/2008
Posts: 11


I agree, over the years, I have seen more scary things than I would care to imagine, and many near misses. It is just luck that more people don't get hurt.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 10:38 AM
Does someone know what crew do they ( sheiks ) have on boar those yachts ???? Does someone know that the crew on board those yachts wouldn't last a minute on a properly run yacht? Does someone know that crew members on those yachts are Filipinos, Bangladeshi and other nationalities treated like SHIT!!!!! by their owners???? Does someone know that the BEST!!!!! nationality you might come across with on those yacht is Bulgarian??? The only western European is the captain and chief engineer, if they are!!!, and the working-leaving environment where they placed themselves doesn't speak very well from them...who the hell would work on a yacht where the people is un-able to say no to a risky job, not because they are stupid as cows but because that is a day-to-day basis back in their own countries. Comparing a deckhand on M/Y bubawi to a deckhand on Pelorus, Kogo, Octopus, etc... is the nasties thing I ever heard. A young guy on this well-known yachts might be less experienced and willing to take more risks than an Indian on Dubawi, the key is that on board these yachts the bosun or any other mate/officer in charge won't let them do something stupid even if it does just risk himself . On Dubawi the owner and managers don't give a damn shit about a Bangladeshi live. I am sorry for that man, I wish no harm to anyone, but I am really pissed off hearing people speaks of a situation they have no idea about. Does anyone think they give a shit about the guy just died?? I am not gonna lough on this one because I should keep a bit of composure here, it is been difficult though....... ah!!!! have no doubt we know what happened thanks to people working on other yachts/port in that area....we wouldn't have found out otherwise...... Does someone think they report what is going on on board that yachts??? That a guy broke his leg and next morning was flying back home with 300 dollars in his pocket and a get the [edited by  moderator]....as a good bye????
Meesa Egypt
Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010 11:35 AM
My deepest condolences to all His family .
Hope to be last sad news .


UKEngineer
Posted: Sunday, June 13, 2010 9:50 AM
Joined: 19/01/2010
Posts: 34


My thoughts go out to the family and friends of the deckhand. In my experience muslim contractors are the worlds worst botchers. The welds needed to have been tested in a survey after the work, this was clearly not carried out. It is not a good idea take take a position upon a yacht that you know is owned or has been worked on by any muslim person. You have been warned by someone who has seen these guys welding and grinding in yards. They make a complete mess of the job and I no longer accept job offers involving any muslim country contractors.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, June 13, 2010 11:45 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


UKEngineer wrote:
My thoughts go out to the family and friends of the deckhand. In my experience muslim contractors are the worlds worst botchers. The welds needed to have been tested in a survey after the work, this was clearly not carried out. It is not a good idea take take a position upon a yacht that you know is owned or has been worked on by any muslim person. You have been warned by someone who has seen these guys welding and grinding in yards. They make a complete mess of the job and I no longer accept job offers involving any muslim country contractors.


Not saying you're wrong, but it's not just Muslims and in Islamic nations that this goes on....

Sam
Posted: Sunday, June 13, 2010 4:52 PM
Joined: 15/08/2008
Posts: 3


My deepest condolences go out to the family and friends of this young deckhand!
Meesa Egypt
Posted: Monday, June 14, 2010 10:34 AM
UKEngineer wrote:
My thoughts go out to the family and friends of the deckhand. In my experience muslim contractors are the worlds worst botchers. The welds needed to have been tested in a survey after the work, this was clearly not carried out. It is not a good idea take take a position upon a yacht that you know is owned or has been worked on by any muslim person. You have been warned by someone who has seen these guys welding and grinding in yards. They make a complete mess of the job and I no longer accept job offers involving any muslim country contractors.
 
with respect to your Experience , But this is not happen only in muslim countries , it happen every where around the world , most people work in dubai is coming india , siri lanka , bangladish , pakistan  and people who are supervising
this employees  mostly eroupean , if you have ever been in dubai you will see that so religions have nothing to connect with this accedent !! it dosnot mean that when it  did  happen on land of muslim country so all muslims are bad ! every where in the world ther is good and bad people .


Meesa Egypt
Posted: Monday, June 14, 2010 10:41 AM
with respect to your Experience , But this is not happen only in muslim countries , it happen every where around the world , most people work in dubai is coming india , siri lanka , bangladish , pakistan  and people who are supervising
this employees  mostly eroupean , if you have ever been in dubai you will see that so religions have nothing to connect with this accedent !! it dosnot mean that when it  did  happen on land of muslim country so all muslims are bad ! every where in the world ther is good and bad people .

Captain Mark Drewelow - C2C inc San Diego
Posted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 4:50 PM
Joined: 07/12/2008
Posts: 63


What advice can you offer (or share experiences) to avoid accidents when working on deck or moving large heavy objects like tenders to and from the sea? Seems to me that the majority of yachts that should be implementing strong Health and Safety (HS) as well as Human Resources (HR) protocol are not doing it. This educated observation is derived from ¼ million miles at sea around the world and frequent contact with large yacht operations. Statistics over time I am sure will show an increasing level of derogatory data within the HS as well as the HR arenas, which will largely be attributed to negligence in the training and oversight departments. Along that same topic, I see uncanny parallels in how the environmental industry and yachting industry have developed, HS in particular. This observation is justified due to 20 years working at sea, followed by 5 years owning and operating an environmental cleanup company here in Southern California, working often times in high risk HS situations. The environmental industry is relatively young. 25 years ago the industry was in its infancy and non existent in areas which are now of critical importance. In the environmental industry, there have been many hands on field techniques developed or borrowed from other industries, which due to lack of training and oversight, led to reportable injuries. As the reportable injuries in the field escalated along with the growth of the industry, the development of protocol for training and oversight to protect field workers increased. Now, all types and methods of field work have been analyzed extensively with documentation, training and oversight in place to prevent injury. In comparison we have the Superyacht industry. Not a young industry as luxury yachts have been around for a long time. What is new is the rapid and accelerating growth over the past 10 years. Look at the industry growth for Superyachts next to the environmental industry and there is a similar growth curve, but with the escalation of growth taking place in different years. The Superyacht industry is in my humble opinion about 10-15 years behind the growth and issues that surrounded the environmental industry. We have high risk activity taking place in the Superyacht industry, with in many cases, lack of common sense full spectrum risk management to prevent injury. More big boats all the time, shortage of qualified crew, high turn over in the way of manning, lack of shipboard training. All of those factors combine to create an unstable situation. The environmental industry was in a similar position 10-15 years ago and pulled through those years via a combination of analysis, documentation, training and oversight. Let’s see to it that our Superyacht industry handles the current HS risk associated with the growth of the industry successfully and properly. Captain Mark Drewelow C2C inc. San Diego
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 1:36 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Mark, I come out of the commercial/industrial side of the maritime industry and have noticed the same thing. One of the issues I have come across in doing shipboard training is the language barrier (not to mention cultural barrier). It can be difficult to get across points and even concepts on how to think (and that's really the issue, teaching people doing the jobs how to think. How to look at, analyze and manage risk.) in ways they haven't been exposed to, or worse, run against what they have been previously taught, with a limited common vocabulary. There is also an overall attitude of "These vessels are just for fun, we don't do anything serious" as well a severe design failures in the name of making things look good in a simple to build form. None of this is conducive to safety. I can't count how many times I've had to remind owners "First and foremost this is a sea going vessel. There are some things you will have to just contend with because it is required for safety at sea." ie: "hiding" life rafts and safety gear among other things.

However, this particular failure appears to root cause in poor construction and fabrication as well as a failure in oversight by the class society.

Aleli
Posted: Thursday, June 17, 2010 4:18 PM
Joined: 24/05/2009
Posts: 1


Anonymous wrote:
Does someone know what crew do they ( sheiks ) have on boar those yachts ???? Does someone know that the crew on board those yachts wouldn't last a minute on a properly run yacht? Does someone know that crew members on those yachts are Filipinos, Bangladeshi and other nationalities treated like SHIT!!!!! by their owners???? Does someone know that the BEST!!!!! nationality you might come across with on those yacht is Bulgarian??? The only western European is the captain and chief engineer, if they are!!!, and the working-leaving environment where they placed themselves doesn't speak very well from them...who the hell would work on a yacht where the people is un-able to say no to a risky job, not because they are stupid as cows but because that is a day-to-day basis back in their own countries. Comparing a deckhand on M/Y bubawi to a deckhand on Pelorus, Kogo, Octopus, etc... is the nasties thing I ever heard. A young guy on this well-known yachts might be less experienced and willing to take more risks than an Indian on Dubawi, the key is that on board these yachts the bosun or any other mate/officer in charge won't let them do something stupid even if it does just risk himself . On Dubawi the owner and managers don't give a damn shit about a Bangladeshi live. I am sorry for that man, I wish no harm to anyone, but I am really pissed off hearing people speaks of a situation they have no idea about. Does anyone think they give a shit about the guy just died?? I am not gonna lough on this one because I should keep a bit of composure here, it is been difficult though....... ah!!!! have no doubt we know what happened thanks to people working on other yachts/port in that area....we wouldn't have found out otherwise...... Does someone think they report what is going on on board that yachts??? That a guy broke his leg and next morning was flying back home with 300 dollars in his pocket and a get the [edited by  moderator]....as a good bye????
 
 
Shame on you whoever you are.


Salvador
Posted: Friday, June 18, 2010 12:07 AM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


That's terryble. My condolences to the family and friends.

I once capsized a rib, engine shut down leaving the beach with swell, got lucky, just scare; other time drank few gasoline once wile transfering, had to purg with milk, very toxic.. almost lost a finger to an intake of gennerator wile freeing propeller from line... and many many more coming to my head... enough of mistakes done to realise value of life over anything else...  keep safe

 


 
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