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Another Tender Accident
Janine
Posted: Friday, February 26, 2010 9:50 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 392


According to Superintendent Evans of the Exuma and Ragged Island District Police in The Bahamas, at 12:30 a.m. on Monday, February 15, six yacht crewmembers left the Staniel Cay Yacht Club to return to their yacht in a 300-hp Intrepid when the tender ran up on some rocks. All six crewmembers, two females and four males from the U.S., Canada and the UK, were airlifted to a hospital in Nassau. Superintendent Evans said that two of the crewmembers were discharged and the other four were held with serious injuries. An investigation is ongoing.

 

A local captain tells us they were the crew of M/Y Man of Steel, and says they hit the southwest corner of Big Majors at high speed.

 

This accident occured mere months after a center console tender from M/Y Integrity hit the rocks, also after leaving Staniel Cay. All three people involved were seriously injured.

 

If you have any information about the most recent incident, please post here.  


Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 12:23 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Sad but not that surprising. The area is strewn with rocks and shoals. Not saying this is the case here, but I've seen a lot of very inebriated people leave the Staniel Cay YC and get in high speed tenders.In general, I find it kind of funny that people who won't let a qualified licensed mate at the helm to dock the big boat under supervision in daylight and good conditions, will turn over a half million dollar tender to a deckie or stew to head to the pub in the middle of the night. Again, that's not to comment on this particular situation, just a general observation set I've made.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 1:45 PM
I have spent some time there and it never made much sense to me that no one ever put a light on that point you can put the pigs on treadmils to power it
Scottyacht
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 1:50 PM
Joined: 21/06/2008
Posts: 2


Great!While many qualified crew are walking the docks,some see fit to take advantage of their situation and have accidents like this-if alcohol was a factor,this is inexcusable and could have been prevented.Get a grip,people!
Tedd Greenwald
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 2:09 PM
Joined: 26/09/2009
Posts: 8


This topic has been front and center for many months since the last high profile disaster in Staniel and I'm very surprised to see it happen again to (supposedly) professional crew. Even perfectly sober on a clear calm moonlight night zipping around the Exumas at night at speed is darn dangerous with radar and night vision goggles. I can only hope that the crew all recover and that we can all prevent more stupid stunts like this happening as it makes all professional crew look bad. It would be interesting to hear directly from the person driving the tender to hear his side of the story. The problem with maritime disasters is that somehow no matter what happens the captain is ALWAYS at fault for letting the rock hit the boat, even if it was anchored..So if your reading this be a "Tiger" and just tell us all what happened so we don't have to guess and we can all learn. Speedy recovery to all involved.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 3:31 PM
It's time to give the yacht crew a crew tender, as we all used to have before all these youngsters got spoiled with big boy's toys. Preferably a rubber boat with with a max 10HP motor
junior
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 3:39 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Who cares what the driver says. I doubt that the tender was traveling at displacement speed. The lesson is obvious. Speed kills. During my career on yachts Ive watched tenders morph from , chug chug lets go have a beer utility craft, into 50 knot class speedboats. I find it terrifying to be in my chug chug tender at night, homeward bound with a group of guests, on the same water as these inebriated , testosterone fueled, 50 knot morons. I consider it irresponsible for crew to even be using these machines at night for booze cruises and even more irresponsible to operate at night, sober, at speed, with guests on board.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 3:40 PM
I spoke with the individuals involved and a navigation mistake was more of a contributing factor in the accident than alcohol.
Adrian
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 3:54 PM
Joined: 08/08/2009
Posts: 17


LOLZ.
Pascal
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 4:27 PM
Joined: 23/11/2008
Posts: 42


It would actually be better if alcohol was involved... hitting rocks at high speed at night is even more stupid if sober!!! a 300hp intrepid is not a real tender... The crew should have used the rib not the high performance toy making the captain is responsible for the crew actions. rocks don't come out of nowhere, no excuse for this. Everybody knows where they are in Staniel
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 4:46 PM
Real mature adrian.. Its not a laughing matter. I wish the crew a good recovery and all we can do is speculate (that doesnt mean try spread rumours). As much as we can all judge and say how stupid it is.. Can you all honestly say you've never driven a tender too fast or never made a navigatonal error (these might not be the case.. but for arguments sake)?

tubby
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 6:27 PM
Joined: 19/02/2009
Posts: 11



why are y'all so quick to judge? Testosterone fueled? high power toy? hell I started when tenders had OARS!
and there was always some maniac with a ten hp strapped on the back of his scaring the hell out of us.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 7:24 PM
Where do I send my resume?

Amanda
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 8:58 PM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 2


Best wishes and speedy recovery to the crew.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 27, 2010 11:43 PM

This latest incident is incredible, not just because of the fact that this EXACT scenario has taken place in the Exact location only months ago, but the fact that this time it was not drunken owners, but in fact drunken crew.  For those of us who know what really happened, and for those of us who really know this exact area, ie. Staniel Cay and Big Majors,  we know it had NOTHING to do with navigational error.  Just unfortunate drunk crew in a high speed, triple engine tender, that belongs to a high profile Mega Yacht.  The most important thing is that the crew that were hurt will hopefully recover fully from their injuries.  Let us think about them first.  Then, let us think about what we can once again TRY to learn how NOT to let this happen again, whether it be drunken owners or drunken crew.

The term Designated Driver comes to mind.  I understand that the Captain was not aboard the tender but that possibly his wife may have been, and may have been one of those hurt badly.  So, please, let us not start bashing the Captain right now.  Let us instead offer positive advice on how to avoid similar instances in the future.  Hopefully, once the situation has cleared, and the insurance issues are solved, and those hurt have recovered, we can hear directly from those involved.  Don't count on hearing from them anytime soon, until the dust has settled. 

As a Captain that works in this area alot, I can only tell you that this has been a problem for a very long time.  Boaters going to the bar, drinking too much, and then boarding their boats, owners and crew, and taking a very big risk in getting back to their yachts.  Let us figure a way to fix this problem.  In the U.S., they did start a very big, multi-million dollar campaign of the position of Designated Driver.  Maybe we should figure a way of making this a part of our industry as well.  Your Thoughts??     Meanwhile, our prayers are for the recovery of those that were hurt in this latest unfortunate event.

 

 


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 12:01 AM
Unfortunatly both speed and alchol were involved. The boss had left that day and they went out that night to celibrate someones birthday. Saw the boat was'nt pretty, lot of blood all around the cocpit front to back. The bow was crunched in and a chunk of Big Major was still sticking out of her starboard side at the water line. They hit the island carving V shaped hunk out of it and then the boat shot up traveling to its right, hence the rock at the water line. The impact was exactly 0.823nm from Staniel Cay dock with only a couple hundred yards to go, whats the hurry. As for who was driving it does'nt realy matter because the captain was on the boat and all decisions rest squarely on his shoulders.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 12:52 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


It's just another mark on the general state of professionalism in the industry. Perhaps we should have a tender license qualification that has us watch "drivers ed" type films reminiscent of "Blood on the Highway" and other such classics. A good bit of this though comes back to an industry largely staffed by "back packers" rather than professional seamen. I once asked the question as to why commercial sector people were discriminated against in yachting and one of the answers I got was quite telling, "because you guys aren't fun." Well, when "fun" involves doing things that get people hurt and/or killed, yeah, that bears some truth to it, but then, how much fun is spending your life in a wheel chair or missing parts of your body? We have a lot of toys in this industry, most of which need to be treated with a great deal of respect and knowledge to operate safely. Without the right training, attitude and discipline (like not getting drunk when you know you're the operator and keeping to a safe speed when you'd rather have the wind in your hair and the thrill of running fast through narrow waters) these same fun toys turn into instruments of death and mutilation. We can't all always have "fun" especially when one of the components of fun is getting drunk. Most of the accidents and injuries I see involve alcohol and/or operating outside the persons knowledge base.

There is another factor with these large tenders that get towed that is an issue and that is the crews are not trained in towing. I have seen far too many, and even predicted one accident that cost a lady her foot. Yachts are not set up for towing and the rigs I see used by yachts to tow these tenders are very hazardous, and the actions I see among crews in regards to towing are down right dangerous.

Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 3:29 AM
I don't uderstand why it is so complicated... One crew member is responsible for the tender and will not drink, that crew member will also know how to navigate and drive the tender at a reasonable speed based on the current conditions. There are plenty of people looking for work, just pick the right ones! And here is to the Captains, set rules and standarts, run a 'professional' boat and incidents like this one will be avoided.
Global_Mongrel
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 3:39 AM
Joined: 30/12/2008
Posts: 7


Firstly my thoughts go out to those that were on board and to their friends and families who maybe affected by this incident. However, I will use this forum like everyone else to post my views and frustrations. Henning I completely agree with you about it being the general state of professionalism in the industry and that a lot of this comes back to an industry largely staffed by "back packers" rather than professional seamen. This is due to the stuck culture of not what you know, its who you know. A hell of a lot of jobs are going via "mates" or newly acquired beer buddies. Networking comes in the way of potential crew buying the rounds and attention (aka Fun) of the current crew/mate/chef/enginner etc or even god forbid, the Captain. There is however a growth outside of the base areas of crew recruitment firms and I'd like to see that be used more instead of dayworking as access to employment. Simple basic truth, would you hand over the keys to your owners new ferrari you've been allowed to use that night to your new "friend" you met in a bar recently when you don't know his ability or if he's sober no matter if he says he's the STIG? (FOR EURO READERS) You wouldn't. If he was the STIG, until he's proved his abilities on paper and been assessed, references check out and he's been informed of policies and procedures etc. Even then, if it was a car and it was the STIG and he drove it fast or drunk and crashed it, prison time potential. Why not in the marine industry? Its just loss of life, job etc. There's very little accountability to anyone now except the Captain unless the MAIB or foreign equivalents find fit. That needs to change. ACCOUNTABILITY!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 5:28 AM
Hello to all, one fact that seems to keep being over looked, the captain was on the boat. His poor judgement and thats an under statement is unquestionably the soul reason for this tradgedy. I spoke to the people that rescued them and thank god for Brian,who runs the water shuttle out of Staniel. He undoubtedly saved there lives.When he came up to the vessel after hearing a May-Day call from a woman onboard at 12:30 am. The boat was going around in circles with one engine out of three running at idol speed. Five of six were unconcious and out cold. Thank god no one was killed by the captains utter lack of duty, responsability and basic seaman ship 101. I have lived and made my living on the water my entire life and the one thing I've learnd and carried with me all these years is never, ever get complacent. On your best day ever on the seas things can go horribly wrong in the blink of an eye. Now equaly important is the fact that we as Captains are both responsable and should be held accountable for the safety and well being of the passengers, crew and safety of the vessel, including all the toys ALWAYS. It is after all what they pay us for. Now I have read a few comments about blaming crews and stews for this act of stupidity. From the people that were there not only is the captain responsable he was driving. After such a poor judgement not only should he be fired he should be drumed out of the industry.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 7:16 AM
Really?? Navigation error??? You may want to check how many shots these guys were slamming down the entire evening (Captain included) and see if any of these crew were capable of walking a straight line, much less driving an expensive "toy". Anyone there as witness will confirm this.
Powerabout
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 8:12 AM
Joined: 22/11/2009
Posts: 14


So what would be the content of the conversation between the Captain and the owner the next day..?
Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 9:38 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Powerabout wrote:
So what would be the content of the conversation between the Captain and the owner the next day..?


"You know you're so f'ing fired right?" The owner also stands to be sued by the whole crew as well if it was actually the captain driving, dude opened a major jackpot for himself and the owner who is liable for him. The captain is lucky that it happened in the Bahamas as most likely they won't criminally prosecute him, but if somebody ends up dying from the injuries his licensing Flag State may very well. He should at very least lose his licensing.

David Evans
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 9:44 AM
Joined: 08/02/2010
Posts: 6


I have been in the Bahamas in this exact region for the last four years and have to say it is no surprise to me either. When we first arrived here I was informed by the mate aboard that 'it is easier to drive with the nav lights off - you can see more as they do not affect your night vision' ..... After I had stopped laughing (on realization that this was not a joke) I went to the dinghies (we had two) and made sure that the chart plotters worked and installed plugs for high power search lights. I made sure that the crew understood how dangerous the area is and that they had to keep a good look out ahead (smaller dinghies going home without lights on) and behind (the Intrepids from the motor boats and Islands). The bit that always made me nervous was the corner where the accident happened as traffic comes together here - I always gave it a wide berth and slowed down too. We have another method for going home - we call it Bermudian style after staying there for some time. It actually means that the engine drowns out conversation so we go slow so we can talk on the way home, it may take longer but you definitely get there. I am sorry these crew were injured and wish them a speedy recovery.
salty spanner
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 10:28 AM
Joined: 28/02/2010
Posts: 14


I've just read thru the posts. Wow. I had no idea there were so many captains & crew out there that have never ever made a mistake in their professional careers. Web forums are great aren't they, you can be a total expert right from the comfort of the wheelhouse & never have to look anyone in the eye. I know the driver of the tender well. I know exactly what happened that night. Most of what has been posted here is true, with a few very inaccurate details. One thing I would like to add - NO ONE feels worse about this accident than the crew member that was driving the tender. The way he has handled himself & the level of self-criticism & responsibility shown is testament to his maturity. He has taken full-responsibility for the accident & offered his resignation before being asked. How many Captains & crew members out there (who may have posted on this forum) have made a significant mistake in their career & swept it under the carpet? How many of you have blamed some other factor to dodge-the-bullet or reduce the back-lash? How many Captains have crashed yachts & lied to the next owners about it? Cowards. How many First mates have told the Captain "...It wasn't my fault, it was the Bosun, or the deckie..." because all they care about is protecting their backside. Not this guy - no excuses uttered, he manned-up & owned his mistake & I can assure you it will be a long time before he stops beating himself up. And he won't be asking a new yacht to hire him tomorrow either. There's not many solid rules in life but we all know the one that is as constant as the tides...."shit happens". I have always thought what's important is the way we deal with consequences that matters more. That's where you find out what people are made of. I'm not excusing or making light of the event - there was definitely some very poor judgement shown that night but it's very easy to sit on your high-horse & crucify the whole crew and it's even easier to do it anonymously via a web forum. It's difficult, and rare, to honestly admit your mistakes, especially in such an ego crazy industry like ours. Oh, and by the way before you all jump to your favourite conclusions, he was not a back-packer - he's actually a very capable mariner who has worked different parts of our industry for most of his adult life. He just had a very, very bad day. And no, "he" is not "me", he just happens to be an old mate. Thanks & gratitude should be given to the guys that answered the mayday & came to their aid. I'm sure they had better things to do but we would all do it for them, even if they'd had a few drinks.
Stari
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 10:43 AM
Joined: 13/12/2009
Posts: 3


We all knows that those who works sometimes make mistake. Accidens happening almost every day at sea all around the world not just in super yacht industry and worst thing is when you lose most value thing - human life.
My opinion is that we don't need deprecate those who make this mistakes because it can happen to anyone. When we look at this accident from the other angel we can learn a lot from it and try prevent to happen again.
My advise for everyone witch are engaged to sea: DON'T  DRINK........

P.S. I wish fast recovery and return home for crew members in hispital.

Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 10:58 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Sorry, this was not a mistake. Tagging a prop on the bottom trying to sneak through a reef is a mistake. Operating a vessel in that area at high speed at night is negligence at best. Doing so while drunk is Gross Negligence, and if somebody ends up dying it's Manslaughter. This was a breech of professional ethics. Whoever it was should feel damned bad. This was not a mistake, it was a huge f- up. In 25 years as a captain  I have never made a "mistake" of this caliber, and what mistakes I have made I've always owned up to.  In that time I have never gotten a person hurt by action or ommission, and it isn't all because of "luck" either. It's because of professional discipline. I don't go out drinking then blast around on boats regardless how much I'd have liked to.  When operating I mitigate risks as best I can.

As captains, we just aren't allowed "mistakes" of this magnitude, ever, end of story.

Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 11:10 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Stari wrote:
We all knows that those who works sometimes make mistake. Accidens happening almost every day at sea all around the world not just in super yacht industry and worst thing is when you lose most value thing - human life.
My opinion is that we don't need deprecate those who make this mistakes because it can happen to anyone. When we look at this accident from the other angel we can learn a lot from it and try prevent to happen again.
My advise for everyone witch are engaged to sea: DON'T  DRINK........

P.S. I wish fast recovery and return home for crew members in hispital.

Why did we need this accident to learn that lesson? Shouldn't it have been learned already from all the times it has happened in the past? It's happened enough times that we even have LAWS stating not to do it for the learning disinclined. There is nothing to learn from this accident.

Stari
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 11:49 AM
Joined: 13/12/2009
Posts: 3


We don't need any accident more but it still happen.
Problem is that personality dosn't have enough experience, every responsible and experienced crew member probably wouldn't made this mistake or huge f-up.
But how it's posible taht Captain give 300 or 500hp machine to person if he dosn't have enough trust for in him, or how he didn't notice his inclinations for alcohol?
Every educated and  STCW certifed crew member know that navigation isn't just what most of them think it is.


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 1:03 PM
I can't help but think that every single person in this tender was to blame for the accident and not solely the driver. We're suppost to work like a team, remember. They should have had a lookout in the front and secondly as soon as the driver picked up too much speed, one of the crew members if not all crew members should have told him/her to go slow, especially in that area. It cannot be that all go out to have fun ashore and only one person gets totally blamed for his/her unprofessionalism. It's too easy to point fingers at an escape goat.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 1:08 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Anonymous wrote:
I can't help but think that every single person in this tender was to blame for the accident and not solely the driver. We're suppost to work like a team, remember. They should have had a lookout in the front and secondly as soon as the driver picked up too much speed, one of the crew members if not all crew members should have told him/her to go slow, especially in that area. It cannot be that all go out to have fun ashore and only one person gets totally blamed for his/her unprofessionalism. It's too easy to point fingers at an escape goat.


Vessels are not a democracy. While everyone carries blame, only one person carries responsibility.

surfshark
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 4:12 PM
Joined: 24/10/2008
Posts: 6


Henning is totally right in EVERYTHING he has contibuted !!   This incident goes back to one thing :  inexperience.    Most of us have grown up around boats and our seamanship knowledge is not simply learned in a Fort Lauderdale school who just charged us thousands of dollars for certifications.    It  is time to put a stop to the dock rat backpacking kids wearing capri pants and stunner shades trying to step into our shoes as 'professional seamen' .
14Freedom
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 5:05 PM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Hey All,

THERE IS RESPONSIBILITY INVOLVED!!! What if they were in the crew car ANYWHERE and this happened??? The "driver" would be charged for a number of things including causing bodily injury and looking at serious jail/prison time.

Just because they were on the water does not absolve anyone from legal responsibility. It's tragic and I hope they all recover.

ATB-
The Slacker

Stari
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 5:07 PM
Joined: 13/12/2009
Posts: 3


In one thing I don't agre with Captain Henning "There is nothing to learn from this accident", maybe nothing for you, me and many others, but there is a thousands of new crew members all around the world and unfortunately this is a good lesson for them.

Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 8:22 PM
The tender driver had no option but to "own up" - there is a police report. Resignation? He was still on the boat almost 2 weeks after the incident. The Captain should have fired him immediately. responsibility and consequences. What is this irresponsible Captain trying to cover up? I wonder if it has something to do with what he is telling (or not telling) the boss. I feel for the guy driving, but this was no accident. This is not the first time these guys from this vessel (again Captain at the helm) drank themselves silly and got behind a "wheel". Comeon "captain" be a man and step up. Is this an indication of how you run your vessel? I can tell you this, i won't be applying for a jobwith this guy any time soon I'd like to live a little longer.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 9:24 PM
Before 3 days costa Europa 249m crash at corner of the pear in Sharm el Sheik 3 crew members died...

Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 28, 2010 10:43 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Stari wrote:
In one thing I don't agre with Captain Henning "There is nothing to learn from this accident", maybe nothing for you, me and many others, but there is a thousands of new crew members all around the world and unfortunately this is a good lesson for them.


Most crew being hired is over the age of 18, the only lesson here is don't drink and operate vehicles at high speeds. If by 18 they haven't learned that one, they are either willfully ignoring it or are too stupid to learn. Either way, they won't benefit from this event.

There is no "something good comes out of it" justification or mitigation for this event, there is no justification for it at all in any way shape or form.

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 4:09 AM
Henning I'm with you on alot of your veiws. It is not a democracy, and the responsability does fall on one person the captain. He is the one who took them out, he is the one that got drunk along with everyone else and he is the one who decided to put his crews life in danger no matter who was driving he was onboard. He chose to let some one else man the helm, he was the one who did not give the order to travel at safe slow speed, if in fact it was'nt him and I have my doubts. He was the one who made the decision not to take the water shuttle which was available instead of having it rescue them. I do not know what B.S. story he told his boss that he still has a job. We can only hope his boss gets DOCKWALK online. Fireing the crew member they say was driving is wrong to some degree because you know it was the captain that told him to take the helm. By the way they all so had another tender and crew member that was not with them they could have contacted to come and retreive them.
Kaj
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 9:14 AM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


Correct me if I am wrong, but 2009 was the worst year for accidents associated with yachts and various tenders, also many of which never reach this forum or even local press, and yes they were probably covered up and or never reported. The onus is definitely on the Captains shoulders end of story. He also has the professional obligation to report any incident to Flag State, which he or she may or may not do.

Sadly there is a massive lack of accountability on the ocean. People can crash or sink yachts and tenders and are still gainfully employed and belting around our bays and oceans like nothing had ever happened. Unfortunately because many of these accidents are in foreign waters, it gives almost immediate immunity to all concerned. This is sadly not going to change in the immediate future.

To be honest, it is almost reliant on crew being welchers, contacting the Flag State or owner and telling the truth. If this is the only way to rid our industry of booze drinking, so called professionals, then so be it. No one else will do it, organisations such as MCA, Flag States etc cannot patrol or govern in areas in such remote locations, the onus is on honesty and integrity, which this industry is sadly and often devoid of.

I have said this many many times and for a long time, this industry is an extremely unprofessional industry. For some reason it harbours alot of idiots who cannot make it in the real world or civvy Street. One of the reasons they can hide and what does attract them to this industry is the fact that they can get away with so much.

Alcohol has a massive inpact on the industry and one that is way over tolerated and often because the Captain is on the wagon as well. He often is the one that lets his crew away with things because he wants to do the same damn thing. I remember taking over a pretty reasonable size motor yacht from a Captain that couldn´t manoever the yacht without downing at least one tinny. He was often seen navigating with a tinny in his hands, guests, charters and owner onboard! No one said anything, no one did anything.

The industry is in a mess, alcohol, drugs, accidents, unprofessional (and even with qualified people too), long dangerously long hours worked, not enough breaks and time off, the 10 percenters, smokers.......and it aint about to change in 2010 either. Come on those who are professional, set the standards, those who aren´t, wake up and make an effort or get out and go back to civvy Street because we don´t need you in this industry.

Capt Kaj


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 10:11 AM
I thought a DESIGNATED DRIVER was standard practice. Actually, it is on most yachts that I have worked on especially where the Captain/Mate/Engineer has a Naval background. This might sound mean but I have been in this industry for several years now and seen a lot of thoroughly disgraceful behavior - from crew out to get wasted following a Boss trip or Guest charter - especially if a decent tip was involved and this is what comes from hiring young surf dudes and bimbo chicks - guys and gals are hired for their youth and looks rather than maturity and responsibility and alcohol + testosterone + hormones is a heady mix. I know because I have been there! Well, we live and learn. I hope that those who are injured recover well and that they are the ones who start a campaign - using photos of the crashed boat and their own injuries to shock people into more alert, aware driving - they can even use Dockwalk as a medium...
junior
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 10:14 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


What makes you think that tender accidents are a recent phenomenon ? Over the years Ive seen many very bad accidents. Remember the missing crew they found , dessicated like raisins, off Panama. They drifted from Martinique in a disabled tender. You only know of more accidents due to the worldwide reach of the internet. Three years ago I interviewed a stewardess. Young pretty girl, with train track frankenstein stitch scars on her face, false teeth and a titanium elbow. Tender accident . This nonsense has been going on a long time. Many times I believe that crew dont realize the danger. Twice on recent cruises Ive had to do midnight search and rescue missions with the mothership to retrieve a disabled tender because crew forgot to top up the fuel tank or picked up a rope in the prop that broke the rubber slip clutch, only to realize that they forgot to recharge the handheld VHF on board. Are your tenders outboards and sheer lines marked with Luminescent or reflective tape ? "GLOWFAST " Good stuff, high visibility , not SOLAS , but might save your life. http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/307/alt7gfglowfastyachtnigh.jpg
Pascal
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 2:48 PM
Joined: 23/11/2008
Posts: 42


This was not an accident, it was the result of criminal negligence which here in the US would land you in jail whether it happened on the road or on the water.

The captain is responsible but to a lesser extent depending on how lenient he has been in the past.  If he trusted the mate or whoever was driving because he is normally a responsible crew member then he was let down and could argue he coudnt' know it was going to happen.

on the other hand if he has a history of letting the crew go out to bar and come back drunk, then he is equally neglignet.

obvioulsy no one on this forum knows the answer to that, especially third party heresayers hiding under the "anonymous" rock.



Anita Warwick
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 6:39 PM
Joined: 15/05/2008
Posts: 37


It is disturbing to learn of injured crew whatever the circumstances.  Often thousands are miles (or kilometers may be more p.c.) from home, being hospitalized  and recovering from serious illness or injury without the support and care of family is a difficult situation.  I am forever grateful for the rallying around and support of  friends and the yachting industry when I was in such a situation.  

Yacht crew are generally young and healthy and with that often comes an attitude if invincibility.  But crew are involved in accidents like everyone else and often in countries without adequate medical facilities.

Fortunately now there are good international health inurance policies that cover all nationalities on and off the vessel anywhere in the world and include Air Evacuation and Repatriation.   I am perturbed though by the many marine insurers who exclude  " injuries sustained due to the effects of intoxicating liquor ".   These are the health plans that are unregluated by state insurers and have many exclusions in their policies.

Often captains and crew, owners and management companies are not aware of this caveat - and captive agents selling only these unregulated plans are not going to point this out!   Indeed until HTH Worldwide was approved as an admitted carrier ( in Florida in 2008),   the insurers in the marine market all excluded alcohol related injuries. 

Time to read the fine print in your policy!   And those of you lucky enough to come from a country with socialized medicine who think you're going to get on a plane and go home if something happens, think again .... When you're in that ambulance, you're not on the way to an airport! 

I wish the injured crew a full and speedy recovery and that this accident creates more awareness of the dangers of driving tenders and water toys.

SEVEN SEAS HEALTH

 


Pascal
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 8:31 PM
Joined: 23/11/2008
Posts: 42


personally, what i find  disturbing is someone using a thread about an accident to spam the forum with an ad for their services...   but hey... that's just me.

Scott MacPhee
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 10:10 PM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 1


May the recovery be quick for all involved: For the Owner, hopefully this blemish in his tenure as a yacht owner will not turn him away from ownership. It was his "choice"(not requirement) to be a yacht owner which in turn helps support the livelihood of many. Unfortunately it appears to be the negligence of the very ones he most directly supports which also puts a serious black mark on the industry which could potentially lose this client. For the crew, Hopefully this tragic experience can be turned into a positive experience at some level. The whole crew has a lot to be ashamed of and a lot of healing to do. In an attempt to learn something from this I offer the following hypothetical question. I am in no position to and I make no assumptions or judgement towards the MOS accident and pending investigation: It seems like a normal event that the crew celebrates the end of a delivery, charter or owner trip and birthdays together at some level and usually at the yacht program's expense(owners wallet). One of the main missions of our job as "professional" compensated crew is to make sure the owner has fun SAFE time whether he/she/them are on or off the yacht. The yachts program is an asset under his name 24 hours 7 days a week. Maybe the ownership will offer to pay for these celebrations, or they even joining the crew. That invitation does not allow us to take a few hours off and disregard the safety policies of the yacht assuming there are policies in place. It is the responsibility of the Captain that these policies are in place and followed. "Accidents happen" is an understood statement but it is not a way to live your life. Accidents are also preventable. There was a crew of many aboard that tender and all share the same mission and all let the owner down. All the best and a speedy recovery for all.
Henning
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 10:25 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Junior, We just had a new tender built and I had them incorporate that into the accent striping, came out nice.

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 11:12 PM
I agree with Pascal, using this to advertise is pretty tasteless.
TiffanyS
Posted: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 1:52 AM
Joined: 21/08/2008
Posts: 30


I see that a couple of you take issue with the Health Insurance person's comments, but I think you might be missing the forrest for the trees. Not this is not the right place to advertise, but she makes a really good point about how an alcohol related incident might leave you in a lurch with respect to having your medical needs/ injuries treated. If what she says is true, and the boat's policy won't cover injuries resulting from the consumption of alcohol, and if I am a Canadian being Med-Evaced from Nassau to Miami, that would suck. I wonder if she is correct that the boat policy won't cover those injuries. Anyone in a position to fact check that statement?
Sue W
Posted: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 2:47 AM
Joined: 04/02/2009
Posts: 1


I find it absolutely deplorable that you all have so much time to spend on speculation and slagging off the captain and his crew. There are seriously injured crew members that deserve our thoughts and wishes for a strong and speedy recovery. These people have hardly been given a thought!! What a disgrace. Discretion is what is lacking in this industry, let the incident be handled by the proper authorities and the lessons be learned from their decisions. I wish all those involved best wishes.
Henning
Posted: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 3:24 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Sue W wrote:
I find it absolutely deplorable that you all have so much time to spend on speculation and slagging off the captain and his crew. There are seriously injured crew members that deserve our thoughts and wishes for a strong and speedy recovery. These people have hardly been given a thought!! What a disgrace. Discretion is what is lacking in this industry, let the incident be handled by the proper authorities and the lessons be learned from their decisions. I wish all those involved best wishes.


Well, when one sustains injuries from their own foolishness (that's being kind, there are more appropriate words IMO, and getting on that tender with a bunch of drunks instead if taking the shuttle offered and operated by sober locals to prevent just such accidents qualifies minimally as foolishness) when coimbined with excesses of alcohol, how much pity should given? Do I hope they heal, yes, but it's not because they have particularly earned it. There are plenty of people who are permanently maimed and killed through no foolishness of their own, and those who are killed by others foolishness that have earned getting better to a greater degree. Fact is, they're damned lucky the boat didn't continue on and kill someone sleeping on a smaller boat. They have my best wishes in recovery truly, but they get absolutely no pity or sympathy from me, nor do I afford any quarter at all for any operators and officers on that boat.

 
 Average 4 out of 5