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STCW95
Ripped off again
Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2010 11:28 AM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


When will people understand that STCW95 is a training, certification and watch keeping standard & not a qualification? Completing the basic safety elements is just the first step in becoming fully qualified. You can do these basic courses back home and avoid the crew trainning rip off in the USA & Europe. I look forward to the day when the MCA reconizes other CoC's from other countries with maritime colleges that meet the IMO standard which is STCW95. MCA courses are watered down, lack education and are tailored made to keep the red ensign flying. I' recomend newbies get educated and trained in the commercial world first and then go over to yachting, because I hear about people failing the MCA modules everyday and I suspect it's the system that is failing & not the people.
G. Threepwood
Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2010 8:40 PM
Joined: 31/07/2009
Posts: 28


The MCA recognizes all merchant titles on the white list. They do not recognize foreign yachting tickets as none of them (including their own) qualifies for full STCW compliancy.

Ripped off again
Posted: Sunday, January 31, 2010 9:51 PM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


The White List is another bureaucratic obstacle that prevents good people working on yachts. I am working with a Uruguayan engineer that is well educated and trained. The MCA does not recognize his certificates and we are in the process of getting a certificate of equivalency. It will be very interesting to see if they let a non-white list engineer with STCW95 level qualifications progress to the Y4 or start from zero and complete the AEC.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 8:02 AM
I wholey agree with your advice (re; commercial) having been trained that way and skipped between commercial industry and large yachts. My training and good standing in the U.S. Merchant Marine has become more important in private industry hiring then, say, a decade ago... times are changing, and whether I command a 126 Westport in the Exumas, or a 67 Viking for the tourney circuit, owners seem to be attracted to my education, training, and experience piloting commercial vessels and ferries, than ever before. In short, there seems to be more of a benefit to commercial mariners in the "current" private yachting industry than STCW alone. The insurance carriers are becoming very strict, and let's face it.. a current officer of the U.S. Merchant Marine is far more "supervised" in their license requirements and security clearance, than your average "yachtie" (doesn't mean I am a better captain, just makes it far less likely I am a flake.. because in one system captains can "fall through the cracks, and TRUST ME.. in the other you are held accountable..for EVERYTHING, EVERYWHERE! I know, I have been in both, and there are NO substandard stoners running a 175' supply vessel @ 35 knts in the Gulf of Mexico!
Chief
Posted: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 4:04 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"I am working with a Uruguayan engineer that is well educated and trained. The MCA does not recognize his certificates and we are in the process of getting a certificate of equivalency."

 

Why are you trying to  get an MCA CeC, is the yacht British flagged? If it is Caymans or some other flag, all you have to do is submit his application for a flag state endoresement. If his training and certifications are determined by the flag state to be adequate, they will issue an endorsement and the guy can work on the boat.

Don't make life any more difficult than it has to be and don't get sucked into the MCA quagmire when you can simply walk around it. I have had absolutely no problem obtaining an endorsement for a very well trained and experienced Uraguayan engineer not very long ago. You guys need to wean yourselves off the MCA teat.

Just to save a bit of bandwidth:

 

" ... there are NO substandard stoners running a 175' supply vessel @ 35 knts in the Gulf of Mexico!"

 

That's funny. I think I would have chosen a better standard to make comparisons. Be very very skeptical of mariners with a GoM pedigree ... it is the maritime source of recessive  genes.



steelbeach
Posted: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 10:36 PM
Joined: 06/07/2008
Posts: 7


In a perfect world  sailing commercial for a number of years then shifting to yachting would seem to produce a well rounded crewman. In a real world not every commercial seafarer can make the attitude change to be a successful "Yachtie". Some of the best crew I've shipped with cut their teeth as kids on deepsea trawlers and were born to fishing families so not many scenarios would intimidate them but when introduced to the yacht industry were unable to produce a constant grin. Knowing that's all it would take to have good food -a comfortable bunk and a continual fair wind in life.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 7, 2010 7:48 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Chiefie wrote:

" ... there are NO substandard stoners running a 175' supply vessel @ 35 knts in the Gulf of Mexico!"

 

That's funny. I think I would have chosen a better standard to make comparisons. Be very very skeptical of mariners with a GoM pedigree ... it is the maritime source of recessive  genes.


There are few of your "recessive gene swampdwellers" left in the GoM oilfields. The equipment is all high dollar and high tech. Watch the close quarters boat handling in Fourchon and such or out at the rig holding the boat steady halfway under the rig for the crane while they rig the lift all while there is a cross wind and current and 5-8' seas, and then watch it in Florida and the Med, tell me where the recessive genes are.... The boat handling skills in the yacht industry are appalling.

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, March 1, 2010 12:55 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I agree with Henning and chief as well.
 
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