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Sea time / miles on Dockwise?
KrazyHorse
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2009 9:33 PM
Joined: 12/09/2008
Posts: 2


Hey there, Im currently on an Atlantic crossing to FL on board a 50m motor yacht, on a Dockwise transport ship.. Was just wondering if anyone out there knows if my time on here could in any way count towards my MCA Yacht Rating? Or if the time or miles can count towards any certification at all? Thanks =]
kdhguard00
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2009 10:22 PM
Joined: 16/09/2008
Posts: 31


I hate to burst your bubble, but I think you're out of luck. Call me crazy, but I think you need to be standing watch or performing watch duties that pertain to the vessel which is underway. Since your vessel is not underway and Dockwise isn't paying you as a professional mariner, I doubt the time/miles count. Ask someone there. I bet they've gotten this question before. Someone, please correct me if I am wrong.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2009 10:41 PM
Absolutely not
KrazyHorse
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2009 11:33 PM
Joined: 12/09/2008
Posts: 2


Thanks! Didn't think so, but doesn't hurt to ask.. =]
benjaminfisher
Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 3:17 PM
Joined: 10/05/2008
Posts: 21


Talk to the Captain, he may be willing to let you stand watch with the crew and sign off some time.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 3:45 PM
Bummer Dude.  Hey I was on a cruise on the Queen Mary II, last week, can I use that as sea time?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, September 24, 2009 9:00 PM
My Mate went on Yacht Path from Vancouver to Port Everglades. He asked the Captain if he could do watches and earn his sea time. He stood a 4 hour watch everyday with the Captain and the Captain signed he sea time. He had to do this in addition to his regular duties on the boat. He also made an effort to get to know the crew.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, September 24, 2009 10:04 PM
Q. What are the different service definitions? A. For the purposes of your qualifying time the service definitions are as follows:- Onboard Yacht Service: Is time spent on yachts irrespective of the vessel activity. Actual Sea Service: Is time spent at sea which may include time at anchor or river and canal transits associated with the passage. Stand-by Service: Is time moored whilst fully victualled, fuelled and stored ready to proceed safely to sea e.g. awaiting the owner to arrive or a Charter to commence. Yard Service: Is time when standing by a build, refit or repair. Sea Service: Includes a combination of Actual Sea Service, Standby Service and or Yard Service Watchkeeping Service: Is Actual Sea Service spent as a watchkeeping officer in full charge of a navigational watch for not less than 8 out of 24 hours whilst the vessel is engaged on voyage. Service should be in the deck department and Onboard Yacht Service reckoned from the date of engagement to the date of discharge. At least six months of the qualifying Sea Service must have been performed within the five years preceding the application. Service may be performed in vessels of any flag. Candidates who are serving in a dual engine and deck capacity will have their service counted at the rate of 50%.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, September 24, 2009 11:55 PM
huh, with all the talk about the lack of experience in crew coming up thru the ranks, I think they should get rid of the 'Standby' time completely, let alone sitting on the back of a Dockwise ship getting a 'free ride'... if the captain of a large ship is willing to let an unqualified person on the bridge (don't forget insurance etc) then good luck to you... working as a 'lookout' and understudy to a Master Class 1 would be great experience.. but sitting high and dry on the back deck, NO WAY... (maybe as an engineer, the crossing is a great chance to get heaps of ER work done... As for getting the Yacht rating... do the extra 2 weeks of genuine seatime and learn and gain experience, that is more important than having a piece of paper...
Chief
Posted: Friday, September 25, 2009 2:05 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


Good post. Evidently the MCA/RYA/IYT troika doesn't see the value of "genuine" seatime. There is more money to be made packing classrooms so the sooner they can sign up for an orals class the better.
junior
Posted: Saturday, September 26, 2009 1:13 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Dock Express is a permanent feature of modern yachting life. I would consider seatime on Dock Express worthwhile. Ive been across the Atlantic more than two dozen times with yachts, but never on a ship. Personally I would value a crew member who did the trip and knows how to correctly prepare and preserve a yacht on an Oceanic trip aboard dock Express. I say let it be sea time.
Chief
Posted: Saturday, September 26, 2009 2:08 AM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"I say let it be sea time." Sure, no reason the MCA shouldn't give longshoremen a shot at a captain's or engineer's job too.
junior
Posted: Saturday, September 26, 2009 5:06 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Organizations like MCA realize that yachts spend very little time at sea . I was just in the engine room of a large Italian motoryacht , built in 1995. The engineroom was immaculate and her engines had only 1800 hours of use. Perhaps two hundred and twenty five 8hr sea days since 1995. The MCA unerstands this and constructs a range of possibilities to allow crew to qualify thier yacht service time. Onboard Yacht Service is the time spent signed on a yacht irrespective of the vessel activity. Actual Sea Service is time spent at sea which may include time at anchor or river and canal transits associated with a passage. Stand-by Service is time moored whilst fully crewed, victualled, fuelled and stored ready to proceed safely to sea. Yard Service is time when standing by a build, refit or repair. Sea Service includes a combination of Actual Sea Service, Stand-by Service and/or Yard Service. Watchkeeping Service is Actual Sea Service spent as a Watchkeeping Officer in full charge of a navigational watch for less than 8 out of every 24 hours whilst the vessel is on a voyage. If I were you I would avoid this forum with your question and inquire directly with the MCA to clarify sea time gained on Dock Express. A person like Mike French might be able to help you.
Tyler Harris
Posted: Thursday, November 5, 2009 6:57 PM
Joined: 24/10/2008
Posts: 6


I have a friend that is a female deckhand aboard a 50M yacht that just made a roundtrip on Dockwise to the Med and back. It may help matters that she is a female and that she is Russian (along with the crew of dockwise) but she talked to the crew and was able to stand 2 four hour watches a day on the bridge of the ship, both ways accross the ocean, and they did sign off on it.

You may have to put on a skirt and learn some Russian but it is possible.  lol


Henning
Posted: Friday, November 6, 2009 1:00 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Chief wrote:
Good post. Evidently the MCA/RYA/IYT troika doesn't see the value of "genuine" seatime. There is more money to be made packing classrooms so the sooner they can sign up for an orals class the better.

Not so fast Chief, USCG may allow it as time towards an initial license. Any time spend aboard a vessel that one did not pay for since ones 14th birthday is accreditable IIRC. If he was serving as payed crew and was at sea underway, it counts. I know several guys in California got their first tickets working as cooks on cattle sport fish  boats and their duties were accurately described.
Chief
Posted: Friday, November 6, 2009 1:52 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"I know several guys in California got their first tickets working as cooks on cattle sport fish  boats and their duties were accurately described."

And your point is? A cook is a crewmember, the time is accepted as valid for getting an OUPV, a six-pak. That is a domestic certificate that has no validity outside US waters, that and the 100 ton don't carry any weight in international service, they are for near coastal or inland domestic waters.


Oh dear Henning, you really should post less and study more. As far as the USCG is concerned, the age is 16, not 14, and sea service is time onboard as crew, not as a passenger, observer, or supernumery. How did you get a captain's license?

Despite what the captain of some Dockwise boat might offer some little hotty, unless she held an STCW unlimited certificate or was placed onboard by Dockwise as a cadet she did not collect a single minute of seatime acceptable to the USCG for seatime because she could not legally serve on that ship in any capacity. If she walked down the dock and saw a Dockwise ship then the Troika would probably accept that towards a yachtmaster license though.

 


Jorg
Posted: Friday, November 6, 2009 5:52 PM
Joined: 23/03/2009
Posts: 8


He can of course obtain sea time onboard the dockwise yacht transport, provided dockwise is taking him on their crew list as a "Trainee Deck Rating" for example!

Conditions apply: 16 years old, medically fit, STCW A VI/1 cert. etc. 

Or were you all born with your licenses?


Henning
Posted: Saturday, November 7, 2009 2:52 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Chief wrote:

"I know several guys in California got their first tickets working as cooks on cattle sport fish  boats and their duties were accurately described."

And your point is? A cook is a crewmember, the time is accepted as valid for getting an OUPV, a six-pak. That is a domestic certificate that has no validity outside US waters, that and the 100 ton don't carry any weight in international service, they are for near coastal or inland domestic waters.


Oh dear Henning, you really should post less and study more. As far as the USCG is concerned, the age is 16, not 14, and sea service is time onboard as crew, not as a passenger, observer, or supernumery. How did you get a captain's license?

=============================================================================

Actually, they got their 100GRT-NC tickets. As for me, I don't hold a captains license, I hold a Merchant Marine Officers License with a rating of Master. As far as I know, no one issues a Captains license. I got mine sailing old schooners and working the deck on tugs in SoCal, and got my first long enough ago that they were still freebies and you had to test at the REC for any license. I'm now on issue 6 and it reads Master 1600GRT 3000ITC upon Oceans, Sailing Vessels 500GRT 1600ITC upon Oceans and Master of Towing Vessels.... I just perused 46 CFR section 10 and didn't spot any age restriction at all for sea service, only a reference to "within the past 5 years". Since the minimum age for the 25-200 ton Masters license (initial tonnage grades issued depending on time on tonnage) as listed in 46 CFR 201 is 19, I'll do the math for you, makes the age 14 at which an appicant can record their sea service. I'd imagine that if one were going for a Limited Master, one could go back to 13.

Now get over yourself and quit being such a sanctamonious pr--k. The only person who can really answer this guys question since the CFRs dont take it into account in the "What is applicable sea service", is the USCG officer in charge of reviewing the applicants sea time since 46 CFR 10.211 does not list what qualifies for sea service and what doesn't, only that it is up to the OCMI to decide or refer to the Commandant. [removed by moderator]


Bandido
Posted: Tuesday, December 8, 2009 7:31 PM
Joined: 20/08/2008
Posts: 1



 
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