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Rookie Deckhand trying for break
Rookie Boy
Posted: Monday, July 13, 2009 9:10 PM
Joined: 09/03/2009
Posts: 4


Hey guys i went to MPT and did my STCW95 in Feb of this year. I'm trying to get in as a Deckhand but i realize the difficulty of getting in. However i also realize that the requirements are also high , in terms of, most employers want someone with experience. I know the competitiveness of the job market and I know it mabe better to have an experienced crew but how do i get in. Who will employ a rookie deckhand . I've signed up with numerous agencies , applied numerous times but nothing just yet. Kindly give advice, any advice would be greatly appreciated as i'm patient but eager to get in.
AndyP79
Posted: Monday, July 13, 2009 11:05 PM
Joined: 13/06/2009
Posts: 42


Hey there ,
 I know what your feeling like right now. I have been around the Maritime Industry for quite some time, and have been upgrading at MPT myself, and still no calls. I can say that there does not seem to be any one set way of going about it. Some will tell you to keep walking the docks, go to the agents, internet, yards, others will tell you to go to Waxy's, though I think that last one is little bit of a turn off when your trying to talk to someone about needing work, and they are there on their time off getting shnockered.
I had a bit of luck today with talking to a couple of people, won't say I got anywhere, but they were polite, and gave me some hints on some places to check that might be along my line. We'll see how that goes. But it was pleasant none the less, and encouraging.
 Don't let the downers drag you down, and keep your head up, and eventually some one has to take a chance on you.
Good Luck,
Andy

Rookie Boy
Posted: Tuesday, July 14, 2009 7:16 PM
Joined: 09/03/2009
Posts: 4


Hey Andy, thanks for those words of encouragement. I'm not gonna let anything get me down or stop me from trying and i'm gonna do exactly what you say, walk the docks, probe the internet, keep incontact with the Agencies and just keep trying. After all its not the end of the road its only the begining. Saying Over but Not Out. Rookie Boy.
Rookie Boy
Posted: Thursday, July 30, 2009 4:44 PM
Joined: 09/03/2009
Posts: 4


Hey guys, even though i've been probing the websites if anyone out thereknow of anyone who's willing to take a new person kindly help me.
AndyP79
Posted: Thursday, July 30, 2009 8:23 PM
Joined: 13/06/2009
Posts: 42


Hey there Rookie Boy,
 So your still here also? I ran outta cash after school, so had to split back up north, so I am stuck for the moment working the internet, and they seem like such a joke. I went to a few of the agencies while I was down therre, but have yet to hear one peep out of them. I had a little luck through some friends while I am here at home, redoing some teak on their personal sailboats, but not exactly what I was hoping for, right?

I am not going to give up though, as soon as I put a couple of bucks back in the bank, I am heading back down to Fort Lauderdale, and can  hopefully get something by trying to wear the bottoms of my shoes out on the docks.
I have found though, with a one page resume a) it is quicker and cheaper to print up a bunch of them, and b) it seems to have people looking at it a little more when you hand it to them.

What have you been doing to find the jobs other then the internet?

Good Luck,
 Andy

bluewater
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2009 8:35 AM
Joined: 24/03/2009
Posts: 2


Rookie... every single person in the industry has had to begin somewhere, having the STCW95 shows you are serious and comitted.

I think positivity has a lot to do with it as there are jobs out there to be had however right now this is Med Season therefore those that will be more likely to be employed right now on your side of the pond are those with a little experience that can keep everything 'shipshape!'... do not lose hope- keep walking the docks, and walk every dock until you build relationships.. at some point someone will know of someone who needs you 'straight away' and you will get the experience that you need! Make sure that your CV or business cards stand out... Good Luck!   


Deckmaster
Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2009 3:57 PM
Joined: 09/03/2009
Posts: 4


I really must thank u guys for the words of encouragement and advice. However the tricky thing about it is that i'm currently based in the caribbean. So walking the docks might be a problem because the section of the caribbean that i'm in thats not possible, so thats why i have to be probing the net. Been also trying to make contacts through friends and associates. I patiently await your expertise advice. Deckmaster.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, March 4, 2010 3:44 AM
This advice obviously doesn't apply for those not living in areas where the boats are, but if you do the best way to break in is to WALK THE DOCKS. It is that simple. All the other things you do in trying to get a job compliment your search and might pay off, but the surest way most get hired in the beginning is by DOCKWALKING.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, March 4, 2010 11:20 AM
Have you considered going on fishing boats, ferries or cruise ships. There's more to the marine industry than yachts. While yachting may be where you wish to be there are other avenues open to keen people wanting to work in the mariteme world. Let's assume you did a couple of years on commercial work boats or where lucky enough to get a cadetship with a cruise line and you seatime, qualifications and experiance enabled you to get a real qualifiaction that is reconizes outside the small world of yachts. I began my career on commercial vessels and the transition onto yachts was very simple. These days you need to think outside the box and the best advice anyone can offer is keep looking and knocking on doors. I've seen people get in the business with no experiance all you need is to persist and take each day as it comes. Good luck and I hope you do consider commercial vessels to build seatime and march forward with your career on the sea.
Henning
Posted: Friday, March 5, 2010 3:25 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Junior gave a really good suggestion a while back. Walk the marinas with a tube of Flitz and some rags in you pocket and ask around "You need some stainless polished?" The true answer is almost always "yes", whether they bring you onboard or not is hit and miss, but you will get some, and you will be seen and become known. When you get on, go to work. Nothing says "Hire Me" for greenhorns like showing you're not afraid to work. BTW, if you're offered a beer, politely decline.

Henning
Posted: Friday, March 5, 2010 3:35 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Anonymous wrote:
Have you considered going on fishing boats, ferries or cruise ships. There's more to the marine industry than yachts. While yachting may be where you wish to be there are other avenues open to keen people wanting to work in the mariteme world...... Good luck and I hope you do consider commercial vessels to build seatime and march forward with your career on the sea.


If someone wants to be in yachting, I suggest they spend the beginning of it in yachts, until they qualify for a commercial grade license, then with fresh ticket in hand, head for the oilfields and run crew or utility boats. Spend a year, two at most there. In that time you will have done more hard core close quarters boat handling than most guys who came up through white boats will do in a career. Then head back to yachts. You'll have a good few years working up the deck of yachts, so you know the jobs and how to direct them, plus you have a good amount of boat handling experience.

roro
Posted: Friday, March 5, 2010 10:49 AM
Joined: 05/03/2010
Posts: 4


I think it is more difficult to get into a commercial ship. I am green and I tried and guess what was the answer : "you don't have enough experience", "we are working with experience freelances". Those were company ordering brand new boats wich were supposed to hire !
And don't forget because no one tell you that but in commercial ship they usually give the job to philipin or est-europen people, why ? because they pay them 300 euro a month, that why. So unless you are an officer or you know someone high up; you're [bleeped]. Otherwise you can try fisherboat, but it is the same story : good job that pay well (like in tuna boats) ask for experience or brazilian or portugeese people. The other don't pay well and you end up with serious backache. Everybody thinks that "seapeople" are different and noble but in reality they act like everybody else.
We are living in a beautifull world

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, March 6, 2010 2:27 AM
So your saying it's to hard to get a job on a commercial boat/ship because your too expensive? Where I come from you can't work on a vessel unless your legal to work in the country, therefore non-nationals can not work on the commercial vessels, so the whole cheaper nationality thing does not hold water. It's hard to get a job anywhere these days and I can tell you in the 1980's and 1990's tough times occured and focusing on how hard it is to find a dream job does not improve your chances. Positive activites like education, thinking out of the box and being prepared to attain experiance in a similar field increases the probability of landing the job. An obvious pitfall of working in a country you have no legal right to work in limits opportunities and this is possibly the real reason people don't go for commercial jobs and not this rubbish about people picking cheap workers. South Africans, Australians and New Zealanders are cheap workers and the trend towards Aisan crew is more than likely an outcome of crew expecting too much reward for effort and or ability to perform the job. Dayworking and dockwalking are very seasonal and the cost of flying between countries and then supporting yourself while you look for a job places a time limit on the job hunt. At the end of the day if your looking for a job you need an edge that distinguishes you from the crowd. I did a technical trade and work in ship building for a few years before making the jump onto yachts. Being armed with eight years of valuable experiance is exactly what helped me get started. Having commerical experiance confirmed my desire and capacity to work on the sea. All too often I see young people start working on yachts with no idea of what the job really is about. Yachting is not for everyone and is certainly more gritty and tough that people think. If you want to work on the sea a yacht, trawler, ship or naval vessel will get you on the sea. If you dream job on a yacht because your looking for big bucks, glamor and a chance to see the world you probably just a dreamer and not suitable to a life on the sea. Its a shame yachting does not have a one year program for entry level people that enables them to build the raw knowledge and skills of a decky and watchkeeper. Yachting is open to the world and so competition is high.
roro
Posted: Saturday, March 6, 2010 12:00 PM
Joined: 05/03/2010
Posts: 4


Anonymous wrote: "So your saying it's to hard to get a job on a commercial boat/ship because your to expensive? ..."

Its exactly what I am saying, as boats are working all over the world  they can hire people from all over the world as well. And if they can't they just need to change their boat flag to some country less regarding about tax and crew legislation. Look at all Yacht flags. As long as their crew old the stw95 its fine.
Believe me on Cargo and commercial vessel "the whole cheaper nationality thing" does hold water !
At the end it is all about money. Why do you think company export their firm to "low cost" country ? It is not to help them but to use them.
Don't get me wrong I have nothing against foreign people, they are just like me trying to get a job.

For the rest I agree with you, it is very hard to work because of the crisis, too many people for the same job and the mentality. Of course the best way to get one is to have experience...but how do you get that experience when all doors are close ???
That why I choose the yacht world, not because of the glamour nor the show off  way of beeing but because it is maybe one of the few industry were you can start from the bottom with no experience and finish to the top.
Anyway I am not going to remake the world but sometime it just piss me off.


 
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