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Maneuvering a sailing yacht compared to a motor yacht
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 1:17 PM
For you captains out there that have worked on both sailing yachts and motor yachts, would you say there is a difference in how you maneuver sailing yachts compared to motor yachts while docking?   If so, what are the differences?  How does a sailing yacht with two engines maneuver compared to a motor yacht?

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 1:26 PM
Below the waterline makes a big difference with the keel. Besides the hull shape is also very different.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 2:26 PM

Well.  If you chop the masts off a sailing yacht you are left with the finest handling motoryacht you will ever drive.  The sailing yachts lateral resistance and its huge rudder make it very  maneuverable. Step the rig and add roller furling sails and now you have huge windage to overcome.  This windage is forward of the yachts center of lateral resistance.  Your bow is going to blow off.  It would be an unusual modern sailing yacht is it was not fitted with a bow thruster. 

   

   Two engines ..Hmmm .....not typical and it will not be able to overcome the bow blow off. Its entirely possible to operate  a sailing yacht free of thrusters by employing a good crew and realizing that every docking maneuver is a controlled crash.  Skippers  who operate these sailing yachts know very well how to use an anchor to keep the bow from blowing off while going stern too. They have good crew manning fenders  and mooring lines and more importantly crew  trained in the technique of using the yachts tender as a push boat bow thruster for close in work.  Practice makes perfect.


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 9:15 PM
Most sailboat rigs are pretty well balanced... mast is located at or near center of lateral resistance (CLR), so the windage on the forestay is pretty much balanced by that of the boom, cabin house, etc.  Most boats like to lay beam-to the wind, including sailboats.  I prefer a sailing catamaran because the twin engines allow you to pivot the boat on a dime, overcoming almost any bow blow off.

Of course docking is a whole other story, if the wind is blowing you onto the dock it is a controlled crash... In that situation any sailor wishes they had Z-drives!!


cdhezel
Posted: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 10:10 PM
Joined: 05/09/2008
Posts: 20


All vessel designs have ther idiosyncacy's, my advice for what is worth, is first learn the dynamics, what and why do different hulls react as they do.

If you can understand the physics, and then apply the unique dynamics of each type of vessel form to these physical forms then you can understand why the hull moves as it does. Once this is known you will find the application of the controls more a matter of judgement than chance.

It then becomes imaterial if the vessel's principal form of propulsion is Sail or Power.


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, March 12, 2009 1:25 PM
<P>"Most sailboat rigs are pretty well balanced... mast is located at or near center of lateral resistance (CLR), so the windage on the forestay is pretty much balanced by that of the boom, cabin house, etc."</P> <P>Whoa !!&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Obviously you were not paying attention back in yachtmaster 101,&nbsp; perhaps sending text messages ?&nbsp; Gotcha!&nbsp;&nbsp; Every sailing yacht built carries its unrigged wind resistance way forward of its center of lateral resistance.&nbsp; Simply walk to the local boatyard and have a look, its as obviuos as the smell of exhaust from a stinkpot.&nbsp;The bow of your sailing yacht will blow to leeward.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;Naturally when you hoist the maninsail the balance becomes more neutral.</P> <P>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Perhaps it has become common for Ft Lauderdale captains to dock their sailing yachts with the mainsail hoisted ?&nbsp; In this case I would recommend enormous multiple Z Drives.&nbsp; </P> <P>Hey....waite a minute, your not selling Z drives are you ?</P>
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, March 12, 2009 1:31 PM

"Most sailboat rigs are pretty well balanced... mast is located at or near center of lateral resistance (CLR), so the windage on the forestay is pretty much balanced by that of the boom, cabin house, etc."

Whoa !  Obviously you were not paying attention back in yachtmaster 101....... perhaps sending text messages ?   Gotcha!!     Every sailing yacht built carries its unrigged wind resistance way forward of its center of lateral resistance.     Simply walk to the local boatyard and have a look, its as obviuos as the smell of exhaust from a stinkpot.    The bow of your sailing yacht will blow to leeward.

Naturally when you hoist the maninsail the balance becomes more neutral.    Perhaps it has become common for Ft Lauderdale captains to dock their sailing yachts with the mainsail hoisted?     In this case I would recommend enormous multiple Z Drives.

Hey....waite a minute, your not selling Z drives are you ?  Gotcha again.....


 
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