Welcome to the Dockwalk.com Forum

 

In order to post a comment in one of the forum topics, you must log in or sign up. Your display name will appear next to your posts unless you check the Post Anonymously box. When writing a post, please follow our forum guidelines. If you come across a post that you would like us to review, use the Report Post button. Please note the opinions shared in the forums do not necessarily reflect the views of Dockwalk.


RSS Feed Print
ENG1
BenH
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2009 1:12 AM
Joined: 07/10/2008
Posts: 3


Hi all,

I just completed my STCW and am heading to over to the med for the up coming season. I've seen that the ENG1 medical has been mentioned a few times and would like a little information on it. Is it necessary to obtain one before I head over to look for a job? Any information would be useful, thanks.


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2009 10:41 AM
Spread the word - get an ENG 1 before your STCW, or at the very least take a color-blind test on the internet - if you are seeking a deck job and you end up being color-blind you have wasted the $ for your STCW.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 12:28 AM
Yes you should get this done. If you are working on a boat that charters then it is an essential document. If it is purely a private boat then it is not strictly necessary, but it looks good to have one to prove that you are in good health. It costs about 80 quid and can only be obtained from an MCA registered doctor. There is a list of registered doctors in the UK on the MCA website. In response to the post about colour-blindness, If your UNAIDED eyesight (without glasses / contact lenses) does not meet the criteria set by the MCA (which includes colour blindness and short sight etc) then you cannot keep watch on an MCA registered vessel (ie a charter boat). Obviously this is not going to stop you from being able to scrub decks and wash windows, but watch keeping is often part of a deckhand's responisbilites, so it may affect your chances of employment. On some private boats an ENG1 is not required by law, so if your short sight means that fall below the minimum standard of eyesight, you can still keep watch etc, as long as you can convince the captain that you have spare glasses and can see properly with them on! Colour blindness may be different though.
 
 Average 0 out of 5