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SHOULD RANDOM DRUG TESTING BE OBLIGATORY
Mike French
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2009 9:49 PM
Joined: 06/05/2008
Posts: 57


I have been posting on the subject regularly and my personal view is clear.  Now however, my interest lies in the opinions of others, so I bring the question to the forum in the hope that the comments of yachties out there will provide a real insight into the sentiment of the industry.
The question is straightforward.  Should we as an industry have to undergo random testing?  If so why and if not, why not?



Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2009 10:33 PM
Absolutely! Zero tolerance.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2009 11:52 PM
No. You have blown this issue way out of proportion. The authorities in Antigua have latched onto this as a way to deflect responsibility for themselves. Crew live so closely together that if someone is abusing drugs it becomes evident very quickly, and should be dealt with properly. I just don't see this rampant drug abuse in the industry. Not among permanent crew. If anything 20 years ago, there were way more drugs being abused. Cocaine was in such common usage in the Caribbean in the early 80s it's not even funny. You just don't see that happening anymore. If someone smoked a it of pot a month ago, or a week ago it bears no relation to their state of mind today. If you can cite marine accidents that have been directly attributed to the abuse of illegal drugs then by all means this should be on the table. But I don't see them. Alcohol use however does have a long and storied career in the history of maritime disasters, and it matters not that alcohol is legal or not. Ask Captain Hazelwood.
nr3
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 3:05 AM
Joined: 15/01/2009
Posts: 53


Personally, I would kind of like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks that they have some sort of right to impose their will on an entire industry.

This is a matter between the Owner/Captain and Crew. Anyone else needs a sharp, many pronged object stuffed straight up their...well you know.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 8:44 AM
Keep up the good work Mike.  Drugs are against the law. As a crew member it is your duty to protect the yacht and respect the laws of any country you visit.   No need to tolerate crew that make poor decisions, break the laws,  shoplift,  drink drive, or any other behavior that is against the law. The yacht world is  competitive,  with many new crew  seeking to enter the industry, if you cant make the grade move on and make room for crew who can.
Pascal
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 1:41 PM
Joined: 23/11/2008
Posts: 42


"Personally, I would kind of like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks that they have some sort of right to impose their will on an entire industry."

well, personally i would like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks they have some kind of right to impose the risks they are willing to take by using drugs, on the vessel they work on, their fellow crew, their captain and the owner.



bridgewatch
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 3:27 PM
Joined: 28/10/2008
Posts: 24


I agree with zero tolerance and mandatory drug testing for crew upon hiring and at random during employment. It is easy to implement for any captain or owner. I would not want to hire any crew who feel that it is thier personal right to be able to take illegal drugs just because they feel like it. Illegal drugs are illegal end of story. If any of these drugs or residue were to be found onboard a yacht pretty much anywhere in the world EVERYONE including all crew, owners, guests would be found guilty of the crime of possession. So if you want to have crew onboard who are considerate, responsible persons and are conscious of not wanting to put the rest of the crew or owner in jeporady of posession of drugs, then mandatoy drug testing is the way to sift out the undesirables. I always have a clause in the crew contracts stating they they must be willing to random drug testing  anyway so that is at least one part of the deterrant. If they don't want to sign it then they don't get the job.

Any crew member who is not in agreement with this can be put in the categories of selfserving, irresponsible, inconsiderate and can thus be put in the "ME" thinking mindset group. Persons with these characteristics are definitely not the type of persons that make the best crew members to live and work with especially since we are in a "service" and "safety" driven industry.We need to get rid of this type of attitude in crew onboard yachts. Seems with some of the responses in many of the blogs out there on our industry www sites that durg use among crew is a problem and the powers that be need to get more pro active about it. As a captain I do my part in this already by not hiring illegal drug using crew.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 3:44 PM
 Zero tolerance.  Drive stupefied crew off the yachts.  If they fail the drug test, tattoo their right hand so that when we meet, I shall know.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 4:24 PM
Absolute bull. [edited by moderator, profanity removed]
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 4:39 PM
Yes, It should be the captains responsibility, If he/she suspects a crew member is using. I wonder why it is not being done anyway ? I won't hold my breath.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 4:56 PM
Pascal wrote:
"Personally, I would kind of like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks that they have some sort of right to impose their will on an entire industry."

well, personally i would like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks they have some kind of right to impose the risks they are willing to take by using drugs, on the vessel they work on, their fellow crew, their captain and the owner.

I don't disagree, however, that still doesn't give you or anyone else the right to regulate, demand, or dictate how another Captain maintains his crew. You have no right to impose your standards on another boat like you're some sort of Carry Nation. There is no screaming demand or pressing need because of an out of control situation. The situation is self regulatory as it is in the Captain's interest to police the situation himself. If you ask me, the real danger we all face are Nanny State Socialists who spend their every waking moment trying to impose their own personal standards on everyone else.


marysarah
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2009 7:26 PM
Joined: 19/01/2009
Posts: 1


Should crew be drug tested? ABSOLUTELY!!
I am a chef and have worked on many yachts for the past 5 years. I feel strongly that if crew is going to be working as a team, confined to small spaces for weeks on end, on anchor, working 18 hours shifts, conducting watches, being on their game all together, getting along with others.... every aspect of our job requires us to be at peace, healthy and happy as much as possible. You implement drugs into that and you get volatile, argumentative, difficult, unhealthy, irrational, hard to deal with crew that is putting all of our lives in danger. Its a NO brainer!!
I have worked on yachts where there was one or two crew that were into that party lifestyle, not just drinking, but heavy drugs! It made the whole chemistry of the ship ..... icky, uncomfortable. It brought a darkness into what should've been the best job and boat in the world. Me and other crew would often stay away from the boat on our down time because the energy on the boat; the partying, was just gross. After a while, then random weird people would just be showing up at the boat!? (can you imagine what would've happened if the owner was on board?) Work would not get done by half the crew, they would stay in bed all day with the excuse that they were sick.
WHAT ARE YOU NUTS!!?? You have one of the best jobs in the world, get to travel, see beautiful places, get paid well, have basically anything you want to eat or drink at your fingertips... and your going to go into a dark cave and hide with your drugs. Disgusting, I will never understand it.
I went to a club with two of my mates to go dancing in St.Martin, we were having the best time; really, memories of a lifetime. I saw across the room a gal that I met at a crew house in fort lauderdale who at the time seemed to be a beautiful person inside and out. I went up to her to say hi and gave her a hug..... which was stiff and cold; what I found was a shell of the person I had met in lauderdale. She was so high, awkward, icky, her beauty had slipped far, far away. Soon after, one of my mates said she accidentally walked in on her in the bathroom and she was in there snorting coke off the back of the toilet and was all whacked. Ya, this is what I want to do with my down time in St.Martin???? Get a life! None the less, me and my mates had a great time dancing until 5am, without abusing anything; just a great time and went to the beach the next day.
When one crew member is on drugs, or abusing drugs, it makes it hard on everyone and they are a liability!

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 5:46 AM
ABSOLUTELY!! Without a doubt mandatory drug testing is a great idea. Keeps the workplace safe for those of us that aren't druggies. Not to mention it sure would open that job market back up!!

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 11:22 AM

"Those that sacrifice security for the sake of happiness deserve neither."

Thomas Jefferson


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 11:26 AM
or vice versa.  d'oh.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 11:30 AM

[Forum post deleted by moderator]


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 3:31 PM
nr3 wrote:
Personally, I would kind of like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks that they have some sort of right to impose their will on an entire industry.

This is a matter between the Owner/Captain and Crew. Anyone else needs a sharp, many pronged object stuffed straight up their...well you know.


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 4:16 PM
Anonymous wrote:
I don't disagree, however, that still doesn't give you or anyone else the right to regulate, demand, or dictate how another Captain maintains his crew. You have no right to impose your standards on another boat like you're some sort of Carry Nation. There is no screaming demand or pressing need because of an out of control situation. The situation is self regulatory as it is in the Captain's interest to police the situation himself. If you ask me, the real danger we all face are Nanny State Socialists who spend their every waking moment trying to impose their own personal standards on everyone else.
 
Dear Anonymous, It is obvious that our industry is in need of regulation on this because many captains do not have  the pro active approach, leadership or management skills to "police the situation himself" as you indicated. That is definitely not going to happen for a great majority of yachts unless it is an official regulation with a reporting system incorporated into it. Too many captains do not bother to take the xtra efforts to do alot of things to promote a safe and well managed yacht in general, unless there is an industry regulation that says that they are obligated to do it. A good example is the fact that many of the yachts less than 500 gross tonnage which are not "required" under ISM regulations to conduct regular safety drills actually do not conduct any safety drills. Maybe you are an "exception" to this but it is quite common for captains to take the easy road out and to "not bother" to do anything extra unless a regulation says that they must and a DPA or management company is looking over their shoulder to make sure that they do so. Captains need policing and more management and leadership education to teach them to be more pro active in their jobs in general. And that is another problem because it is a fact that most captains do not want to bother to take any extra course unless "regulations" require that they do so.
In our industry where operating of machinery and safety of guests and crew is so much of what we are responsible for we have a grave problem with captains who do not have the leadership to be more pro active.  Solution: mandatroy random drug testing. It is one way to help illiminate the lazy, irresponsible attitude in this industry.



Chris Taylor - IYT World
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 5:03 PM
Joined: 25/06/2008
Posts: 27


I cannot believe this is even being discussed. Of course testing should be mandatory. If the Captain does not deal with it then the authorities should.

Would we be discussing this if it was airline crew we were talking about?


monback
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2009 5:25 PM
Joined: 21/01/2009
Posts: 36


You correct Chris, and to make it easier for all of us I suggest you guys  lobby insurance companies, the same way the MCA gang did, and simply make testing a requirement....dont ask crew what they think... who cars what they think.
roger
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 4:23 PM
Joined: 09/01/2009
Posts: 4


Of course drug testing should not be mandatory.  Human rights.  1st amendment.  Habeus corpus.  Democracy.  Scare me not.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 4:39 PM

Something that frightens me regularly here is the control freak syndrome.  captains (sic) and their wives too (see other post, we all knp\ow them!).  You do not have the right to impose your morals on all those around you.  You certainly have the right to impose the law regarding drugs on board but not the moral implications of what your crew do ashore.

Alcohol is a drug too, the most commonly abused in this business.  I smoke dope; I take coke.  I rarely drink and I don't smoke tobacco.  I never do any of these on board or within 48 hours of sailing and I am always dry at sea.  I never bring anything illegal on board.  Including hookers, that's one that gets sidelined too!

 

Can you say the same?  Sundowners?  That's drinking on watch.  I'm not a pedant but the frightening bigotry of the industry standard keepers belies belief.

The founding member of the PYA has now sunk 3 ships. 

Bears thinking about...


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 5:17 PM
Everyone laughs at the PYA,  they are a pimple on a pigs ass,  but this is no reason to be soft on illegal behavior around the yachts.  You may well think that you can...HANDLE IT, or that your smart, but I dont know who you are and I am not willing  find out and  trust my job with your judgement.  Stay away from drugs. Dont even mention them, do not hang around with people who do them, dont go to the pub that sells them..   and never, ever try to defend your right to do as you please with your personal life on a yacht  or..... I will not hire you.  You cant hide because I ask every crew, every person I know, even the dam bar owner who you are before I let you into my world.  Stay clean.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 5:42 PM

So don't drink either.  I don't want a piss head making decisions, just having the one or leaving hungover or still drunk.

 

I live my life the way I choose ro, but I do it away from the boat and never the twain shall meet.

Hung over departures is drug taking too.  And if, as I suspect, you are a captain (got that subtelty off another bloke here), then you are risking everyone elses life.

Face it, it's only the captain that gets nailed.  For sure he does not deserve it and it is wrong.  Just forget the bigotry.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 6:02 PM

No way I'd work for you!  I would encourage others not to too.

Lets go back to "Personal Life".  You, as captain (sic) do not have the right to dictate a moral code.

Common examples of low moral standing in the business:

caprain: wife and girlfriend/stewardess

mate and/or engineer: hookers, booze, drugs

deck crew: all of the above (maybe not the captain but defo his wife)

Stews: all of the above (ex wife - though I would like to watch)

 

I don't judge any of these people for anything they do, it is their choice.  NOT YOURS

Please by all means live by your moral code, just don't ask me to abide by it too.  You are coming across as a Jehova's Witnesses.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 6:57 PM
Some of you have obviouusly never been to Palma!
Luxyachts
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 7:18 PM
Joined: 24/02/2009
Posts: 8


I chuckle when I see post of this nature as there is the usual bravado of "yes, we must do this" balanced by the civil libertarians expressing their "personal rights".

As a company we have conducted hundreds of drug tests of crew and brought off-duty law enforcement drug detector dogs onboard numerous vessels. The intent of those tests was to screen the crew working on vessels in our care and certify to the owners (and more importantly any authorities that came to inspect the vessels) that the yacht was "clean". In theory this was fabulous...in reality it was not.

The reality of drug testing is that crew fail random drug tests when administered correctly. We experienced a 17.5% failure rate when we switched to hair sample testing. So if you are working on a vessel with 10 crew, there's a good chance that 1 or 2 of your crew mates are current users of illegal narcotics. The US government has done some great research on the corelation between work place injury and drug use...you want to work on a clean vessel if you value your health and safety. (Sadly, most users also tend to distribute their drugs to co-workers so when you find one drug user there is usually more)

When we administered urine testing we had zero positive results over a six month period. We switched to hair testing after a group of 22 crew tested clean with urine tests when we had solid intelligence to indicate that a large number of the crew were using non-doctor prescribed narcotics.

For testing to work you need to have resolve from the owners and the flag states to take action when a positive result is received. We do not have that resolve within our industry at this time. Many owners are the source of the narcotics onboard and some flag states have no interest in the narcotics unless they are in a quantity intended for distribution. (and even then the scale can be surprisingly large before interest is confirmed). The zero tolerance policy, of the Reagan years, here in the USA is a thing of the past.

So, as a company conducting random tests, you have many pitfalls to overcome without the support of the industry. The clients that you lose are ones that you did not want but the crew that you expose still have a voice within this industry and are often not afraid to voice it with their personal "spin" on why "they chose to move on".

I did like one of the anonymous comments that mandatory testing would open up the market. I think that you would be surprised by how much if we went to a mandatory testing with zero tolerance.

In one week in 2007 we attended two vessels where there had been a crew fatality caused by drug overdose. I read no mention of either of these fatalities in the yachting media. Neither captain had any idea that their crew members were drug users.

For crew who test positive we removed them from vessels in our care "with cause". Their employment file is marked with the test results and they were encouraged to take a six month vacation from the industry. After six months passed we would offer them a free re-screening test to prove that they had been clean. To date nobody has come back to us requesting a free test.

So, do I believe that yachting has a drug problem? Yes. Of course I do....what do you expect when you take a large number of young people, deprive them of any form of "normal" supervision, give them large amounts of cash and on the rare occassion that you give them time off you drop them in a luxury resort destination where narcotics are cheap and readily available. Anyone who tells you otherwise needs to drop their crack pipe and think again.

Is mandatory testing the answer? Yes...but with lots of conditions. You need to educate and provide appropriate support for crew to identify the risks of the many recreational drugs that are out there and how to get off them. This training and support must include alcohol.

As the Maritime Labor Convention comes nearer and the yachting authorities modify the current rules with whatever "yachting" ammendments that they deem appropriate you can be absolutely certain that maintaining a safe working environment onboard will be a firm responsibility placed upon the owner and through his representative onboard, the captain.

If you are worried that your civil liberties are being infringed upon by somebody, once a year, taking a small sample of your hair then I think it's time for you to start looking for another job now.

Rupert Connor

Luxury Yacht Group LLC


Chris Taylor - IYT World
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 7:26 PM
Joined: 25/06/2008
Posts: 27


It is not about freedom of choice, it is about acting in the best interests of the owner and crew who are liable in the event of an arrest, an accident or just for the well being of guests and owners. It is about responsibility and about respect, not about choice. Choice is to be responsible and professional or not.

 

As a matter of concern is the fact that posters are also hiding behind Anonymous. If you are so sure of your position then post under your name. Stand up and be counted!


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 8:29 PM

Nobody has the right to take a hair sample, to register my DNA and to use it as they see fit.  Liberty, sacrife etc are big words.You just don't have the right, nor do you have the right to demand my name and to do with it as you see fit.

Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose vis-à-vis an introduction, so let me simply add that it's my very good honour to meet you and you may call me V.

 

 


Luxyachts
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:07 PM
Joined: 24/02/2009
Posts: 8


A simple and reasonable condition of employment is to submit to drug screening and a suitable clause granting this permission is contained in most employment contracts...and on the forms that a crew member signs when we take a hair sample with their permission...

The 17%+ that failed the drug tests all gave their permission to be tested...they just thought that they could beat the test. There have been many more that refused to be tested not included in that statistic.

Accept this modest imposition or not...personal choice, personal liberty, your choice. Accept it, yachting is a fabulous industry. Don't accept it? Then please don't polute this business and try to hide in it's shadows claiming civil liberty infringement. Working on a yacht is not a free democratic process. You don't get to vote on how to dock the yacht or when your next watch will begin.


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 9:56 PM
obviouly we disagree
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 10:09 PM

You can talk about your rights all you want. BUT just as you have the right NOT to take the drug test, the yacht onwer or captain has the right to NOT hire you because you refused to take the test. Owners and captains shouldn't have to subject themselves, their families, other crew and guests to working with/living with/dealing with people who use drugs simply because that person is throwing around words like rights and civil liberties. Yes, you have those, but laws prohibit the use of drugs, thus taking drugs is not included in your rights or civil liberties.


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 10:13 PM

does he?

I think this is the crux of the disagreement.

 

 


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 10:15 PM
Nor should owner's, wives, families indeed anybody have to work with alocholics; yet we all have.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 10:21 PM

Neither is right, but simply because there are alcoholics does not mean that there should be drug users either. Both are bad however, one is legal and socially acceptable in moderation. The other is illegal and can not only get the user themselves, but others on the vessel in a whole lot of trouble. You can't justify one with the other.


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 11:19 PM
I suppose leading the owner of the yacht on a hike to the top of Sage Mtn. Tortola, to pick magic mushrooms is out of the question? Even if he offers a bonus? Damn.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 12:27 AM
Any illicit drug use shows a lack of respect for the law, a lack of respect for one's own body and a critcal pre-disposition to knowingly make irresponsile decisions for self-satifying reasons. It is a red flag that the person suffers from an utter lack of character. Who would want to hire a drug user or work for one? I say test away and dock the cost of the test from the last paycheck of anyone who fails!
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 12:30 AM

"Personally, I would kind of like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks that they have some sort of right to impose their will on an entire industry."

 

Personally I would like to know what goes on in the mind of someone who thinks breaking the law is acceptable in any industry. Idiot.


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 9:36 AM

Illegal?  The war in Iraq was illegal. Using depleted uranium shells is illegal.  Using white phosphorus shells on civilians is illegal (Gaza).  Stealing $50bn is illegal.  But none of the above gets you put in gaol.

 

Never on the boat is the rule.  Then you are only harming yourself.  And I think you have the right to do that still.


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 9:38 AM
Anonymous wrote:
Any illicit drug use shows a lack of respect for the law, a lack of respect for one's own body and a critcal pre-disposition to knowingly make irresponsile decisions for self-satifying reasons. It is a red flag that the person suffers from an utter lack of character. Who would want to hire a drug user or work for one? I say test away and dock the cost of the test from the last paycheck of anyone who fails!

Hitler had much the same views.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 2:20 PM

Actually, that's not true. Perhaps you should read up on topics before spouting off about them. You are only trying to stir the pot.


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 2:43 PM
Anonymous wrote:
I suppose leading the owner of the yacht on a hike to the top of Sage Mtn. Tortola, to pick magic mushrooms is out of the question? Even if he offers a bonus? Damn.


Can I work for you?

 


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 2:55 PM

Muslims, Lesbians, Druggies, you're just not our type.  SIC

"I'm an Englishman and I'm God damned proud of it."

Drugs weren't the point, thickie, intolerance was the point.. What is the difference between you insulting hedonists and Hitler insulting Jews?  Your opinion is yours and therefore reflexive. 

Live and let live.

 


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 3:15 PM
Guys your drifting off topic.   The question being asked is whether drug testing will raise the level of professionalism in the industry. 
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 7:07 PM
Well it is safe to say that views are somewhat polarised amongst respondents.

Thanks to Rupert for sharing some of his actual experiences and thanks to everyone really for their impassioned comments.

The fact is that when you are part of a yacht crew you become a shareholder in the duty of care you owe your shipmates and passengers.  Your entitlement to civil liberty extends only so far as it can without compromising other peoples civil liberties.  In this case your shipmates and passengers.  The fact is most of the crew have a safety role to play in the event of an accident.  This means like it or not if you were under the influence of anything that altered your mental state you are negligent in your duty of care.  With regard to drugs the law specifically controls them and hence the legality is what determines, in law, that you are not allowed to use them.  End of story!  Anyone who thinks they have a 'right' to break the law is wrong and fails to understand the concept of civil liberty.  You can trace origins of this this point all the way back to the 'age of enlightenment' and Adam Smith's theories on social contract.

No-one suggests imposing their will upon the yachting sector.  The will of the people has already been done by politicians voting into law the legal position with regard to controlled drugs.  The suggestion is quite simply to encourage  compliance with the law and nothing more. 

Several people have expressed the point that they can handle using illegal drugs because of the way they personally control their use of the drug in question.  If you think this is in any way a smart point next time you get a speeding ticket walk into the nearest police station and say..."listen up, I know the law says 55MPH but I am a really good driver and I don't have accidents so why should I get a ticket..." The police officer will then explain my point to you perfectly clearly.

Mike French


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 7:35 PM

I feel sorry for crew on yachts in which the owner has a friendly view towards drugs.  I would suggest that you search for a new job. You can do better.
 For all those that think they can behave illegally on their free time I say fine, do as you please, but you must not sign on as a yacht crew, choose a shoreside career. .  When you sign on as crew you have no free time, the yacht owns your behavior.  Everything you do reflects directly back on the yacht. 
   Just a week ago I was in a yachty pub having a beer and watching the football game.  Sitting next to me was an intoxicated crew, in a quite moment he turned to me and asked if I new anyone that was selling some "stuff" .  He had no idea who I was, I never met the guy before.  This guy was wearing a crew shirt with the name on the yacht on his chest !!   Your relaxed attitude towards drugs will be noticed in the yachting community and reflect directly back towards the yacht.  You will pollute the reputation of its crew who have no need for drugs.  Unacceptable, your personal freedom can never be allowed to effect the reputation of others.

     And a tip for you young crew looking to break in.  I recently got a resume from a Crew agent.  Crew Agents always interview crew and write little observations on the resume like...well presented, happy smile, good attitude.  A good agent knows the local scene.  On this resume the agent wrote, likes to drink a beer at @#$T Pub.   I know that place, its druggy and that notation was an alert from the agent to BEWARE.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 28, 2009 10:54 AM
Crew agreements and contracts, which are flag state approved, clearly state policies on drugs and alcohol, alcohol is not to be consumed when duties are current or due to be undertaken, when off duty, still to consumed in moderation. DRUG Policies however, are clearly stated to include all periods whilst in employment with that employer, see a caymans approved crew agreement here.... http://www.cishipping.com/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/SRGHOME/CREW/MANNING/MANNINGPOLICYMANUALREV07APRIL2008.PDF ................ It also states that when off duty the crew member is seen to be representing the employer and therefore their behavior has to reflect this. So, if thats the law, and individuals signed a similar crew agreement, wheres the debate ?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 28, 2009 11:43 AM
Well, I in no way approve of drugs or any other non professional behavior on yachts, but I find it almost farcical that you would quote a Caymans Flag agreement as representing the highest standards of ethical behavior.  Your yacht is flagged caymans  to allow its owners to hide income, side step tax' and defraud the citizens and government of revenue owed .  Please, in future quote from national flag contract and stay drug free......

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 28, 2009 11:58 AM
I am not on a cayman vessel, However here is the MCA policy on drugs I assume that is considered to be an "acceptable" Flag.http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga07-home/workingatsea/mcga-medicalcertandadvice/mcga-dqs-shs-seafarer_doc_inf/mcga-dqs_st_shs_approved_docs_list-2/mcga-dqs_st_shs_approved_docs_manual-a-8.htm
Marlin
Posted: Friday, May 1, 2009 2:10 AM
Joined: 04/03/2009
Posts: 12


Any yacht owner that does not have a drug testing program is just asking to lose his boat. If any illegal drugs are found on a yacht entering US waters it is considered to be smuggling drugs. Without a pro active program the owner and captain are considered part of the problem. 
 
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