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Industry Standard Wage?
captainblaise
Posted: Thursday, February 12, 2009 9:10 PM
Joined: 23/10/2008
Posts: 12


I was just curious as to what "Industry Standard" wage means these days.

It seems that the wages have been less affected in the larger yachts than they have been in the smaller ones.  Is this the general consensus?

Based on past experiences my take on salaries are the following for a typical 140+ yacht:


Captain = 10-13k/month

Mate      = 6-8000k/month

Engineer  =8000-10000k/month

Chef          =7000k-9000k/month

Chief stew  =5000-7000k/month

Stew & Deckhands=2500k-3500k/month


Is this still accurate? I'd love to have some crew agent’s way in on what the going rate is these days for crew.

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Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 2:21 PM
Crew agencys are representatives of the yacht owner, not crew. Afterall, it is the yacht owner who pays the fee, not the crew. Therefore, most crew agency salarys posted are on the low side. But for captains, you can figure $1000 per foot per year or more, depending on time in servce and experience.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 3:10 PM

Seems that there could be a problem with how crew agencies work up salary guides.  Crew agencies are usually paid based on comission.  Comission is based on salary.  Hence, crew agencies receive great benefit if they are to inflate salary expectation guidelines.

Back say 10-12 years, whatever the number, crew agencies started publicizing salary guides online.  When I look at the time line, there seems to be a realtion to the ease of availability of the salary guides and the unusual escalation of salaries paid. 

To the benefit of whom?   The crew agencies, not the owners nor the crew.

This is just a theory.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 4:38 PM
Over 15 years in the industry as a captain and I have never had a mate, engineer, chef or chief stew paid that amount of money.  The only crew wage that is in line with industry standard is stew and deckhand.  What yachts have you worked on?  AND, I now have a job paid in the range you stated for captain.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 4:55 PM
It would help if you put some sort of reference in there. Are you talking US Dollars or Euros because there is an enormous difference between the two.
for the captain who states that in 15 years of yachting he/she has never seen those wage amounts for certain positions then I suggest they re-think their whole approach to the industry. If he/she has not EVER been on a boat that pays those figures at the 140'+ range then an incredibly bad taste is going to be left in EVERYBODY's mouth as I think the amounts stated are close to the bone (for very busy yachts) and have been static for at least the last 6/7 years which in itself is a pretty sad indictment on things.
Crew wages have not increased very dramatically in the last few years at all except for the wages of Engineers who have been very clever in their approach to yachting since the inception of the PYA and their invitation to the MCA to 'MANAGE' the yachting industry and implement their code.
The approach of crew new to the industry has been to DEMAND more (because of a perceived shortage due to all the new Mega-Yachts out there recquiring ridiculous amounts of crew and draining the available pool of talent but seldom do they recieve it as bosses do not see fit to come to the party for Green crew and fair enough too.
In the end the wages should reflect the program onboard, extremely busy, very busy, busy, not so busy, tied to the dock 12 months of the year or whatever. The wgaes should compensate crew for the hours they work and what sacrifices they make in their personal life to do so. A yacht travelling all over the globe and with crew onboard working 12, 15 or 18 hours a day, 7 days a week should receive compensation for that. A yacht that allows a 9-5 work schedule 5 days a week should get a normal pay check. its a pretty simple translation when you strip it back to basics.
Crew are not paid fantastic wages because they work for rich people, they get paid well for working long hours in difficult conditions away from home pure and simple.
Have a look at the schedule and the bosses expectations and plan your pay rates accordingly.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 5:09 PM

There are yachts in Europe were you get paid better and other yachts were you get very low wages; this depend on many factors.

Wages indicated (in US$) in your table for Engineer, Mate, Ch.Stewardess and Chef are quite high for a 140' nowadays; may be these figures reflects a boat were you get paid very well, but unfortunately are not so much...

The table give the right figures for Captain and deck hands.

And don't forget, that today more and more yachts are employing crewmembers from East Europe and far East, in almost every position.

Crew members from Indonesia of Philippines are very often  paid 1/3 only of the European standards.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 5:57 PM

as reference..... the  United States Department of labor ,  commercial maritime salaries..

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of captains, mates, and pilots of water vessels were $53,430 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $38,880 and $69,570. The lowest 10 percent had earnings of less than $29,360, while the top 10 percent earned over $89,230.

 Annual pay for captains of larger vessels, such as container ships, oil tankers, or passenger ships may exceed $100,000, but only after many years of experience. Similarly, earnings of captains of tugboats are dependent on the port and the nature of the cargo.

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of ship engineers were $54,820 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $41,190 and $74,360. The lowest 10 percent had earnings of less than $34,140, while the top 10 percent earned over $92,860.

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of motorboat operators were $32,350 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $23,340 and $45,850. The lowest 10 percent had earnings of less than $17,270, while the top 10 percent earned over $55,170.


Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 7:00 PM
Just for the info.
I have recently started a new position as Head Chef on a 200ft yacht.  Busy Charter.
I was pleasantly surprised when I was offered $8750.00/m with 2mths leave per year.
In this economy, I thought it was great. The job.. great. Busy, high standards, great crew and captian. Owenrs, dont seem to be affected by the recent times. And the yacht does charter.
I have been on large yachts for 5.5 years.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 14, 2009 7:15 PM
Good on you...sounds a  decent wage for your work...these kids asking for 8 grand a month, on 8 crew boats are dreaming...
captainblaise
Posted: Sunday, February 15, 2009 5:05 AM
Joined: 23/10/2008
Posts: 12


Just wanted to clarify, I took those wages from the last vessel I worked on, which I ended on in Nov. (140')  and a friend of mine who just became captain of a 150'.

I completely agree that Engineers have the ultimate bargaining chip, I was just told that an engineer on a 150' was getting upwards of 9500 a month well over the Chief officers salary of 6500. That difference seems a bit high considering the engineer had never served on a vessel over a year and only had small month stints on vessels of similar size. But of course engineers are in great demand and mates seem to be a dime a dozen these days.

That goes for chefs as well, it seems that they can pretty much write their own ticket.



captainblaise
Posted: Sunday, February 15, 2009 5:07 AM
Joined: 23/10/2008
Posts: 12


Anonymous wrote:
Just for the info.
I have recently started a new position as Head Chef on a 200ft yacht.  Busy Charter.
I was pleasantly surprised when I was offered $8750.00/m with 2mths leave per year.
In this economy, I thought it was great. The job.. great. Busy, high standards, great crew and captian. Owenrs, dont seem to be affected by the recent times. And the yacht does charter.
I have been on large yachts for 5.5 years.


Congrats, seems like you hit the jackpot!

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 16, 2009 12:43 PM
I run a 47 meter charter boat with substantial owner usage.  Your figures are dead on for my boat except for the engineer where you are a little high.  However when we reach the Med this summer I expect I'll have to step up to the outragous demands of the few licensed engineers in "the pool".  Many of these guys have come from the commercial side for the better pay and better working conditions.  But they want the rotation of commercial work and the pay and conditions of yacht work.  I guess it is human nature to want it all. 
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 16, 2009 2:42 PM

Your figures appear to be well researched and are probably fairly accurate.  However, having worked both commercial and yacht work I don't feel that a direct comparrison of raw income numbers paints the whole picture.

In the commercial world I worked 28 on and 14 off for a 42 day cycle.  During a year there were 8.69 cycles.  That works out to 243 days on and 121 off.  At $375 a day I grossed $91,125 annually.  I lost two travel days for each cycle and had to pay for my transportation.   In the yacht world I get many weekends off,  occasional "extra days" compensation for weekends worked and 30 days paid leave.  Subtract the leave,  75% of 48 weekends and a few comp days I figure I work 253 days a year.  At my annual salary that works out to $581 per day.  If you include $20,000 annual average for tips the daily grows to $660.  

If you compare ports of call the difference is equally glaring.  Do you prefer Port Fourchon, Lousiana or Antibes, France, Lagos, Nigeria or Monaco?  On a ship after you work your 12 hr shift your bunk or the day room is your only option.  You can't go ashore because you are underway.  On my yacht, I carry a motorcycle for entertainment after work.  If you compare the quality of the people with whom you work and live it is another easy decision.  The accomodations and food are night and day.  The equipment and maintinance program couldn't be more different.  My last supply boat was 36 years old.  My current ride is 6 years old.  Last year my yacht received a $1,500,000.00 refit.  My supply boat received a roller paint job by the crew while underway over top of concrete blown off the rig during a loading operation. 

I don't get home every four weeks but my wife is welcome aboard any time with or without guests.  On my commercial boats I didn't want my family to see the conditions in which I lived much less invite them to share them with me.

There are decisions to be made every day.  Few are as easy as this.

Be sure to thank the owner the next time you see him! 

 

Happy Cappy 


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 16, 2009 4:52 PM
I have worked in the merchant navy too, for 24 years, from deck cadet to captain on huge container carriers. Wages are not so high there, and your life is something like in the prison. Here in the yachting industry is much better, and salary for captain is very good
 
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