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M/Y Yogi Sinks
Janine
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2012 4:20 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 386


According to Boat International, 60-meter M/Y Yogi was in the Greek Isles in poor weather conditions when she experienced technical issues, began taking on water and subsequently sank. All crew on board were rescued by helicopter.

Get the full story and watch the video here: http://www.boatinternational.com/2012/02/17/superyacht-yogi-sinks-off-skyros-greece/

Photos below courtesy of www.hcg.gr

 

 

 

 

 

 


Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2012 10:07 PM
LOL. Poor weather conditions? What? Overcast skies? Can't wait to hear how this one went down. Technical difficulty in that position would be a side shell plate falling off or someone opening a door below the main deck. A broken valve would cause some listing, but the watertight doors should keep her afloat. She is a 2 compartment boat according to ABS. Very, very interesting...
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2012 10:59 PM
Agreed, this would have to be a catastrophic failure of several systems. Is going to be a very interesting story behind this one. Can't help but think that human error is again going to play a big part in this one
Cizealin
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 12:21 AM
Joined: 26/07/2008
Posts: 50


Wow! Just got the news. What ever happened there? Hi tech new yacht, good evacuation (looks like which is good if nothing else). But a bit scary, don't see the yacht's tenders around so something bad must have happened quick. Let's all be pleased it looks like a little of a sucess re everyone got off OK? Respect there for the organisation of the yacht perhaps?
rodsteel
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 2:14 AM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 275


Anonymous wrote:
LOL. Poor weather conditions? What? Overcast skies? ...


I read elsewhere - force 8 winds - captain says problem with exhaust system, not with weather ...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hY2SiMTncM0   (ooops... same video as above and same info re weather)

 

 

 

 


jadran74
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 2:44 AM
Joined: 23/03/2011
Posts: 1


Well, thank's god, everybody is safe an alive. I cannot say that I haven't saw it coming, not because she sanked, but because I've sailed for some time on Yacht as CE, and with my humble merchant marine background I see unfortunately what kind of weekend sailors are working in Yacht industry. So I welcome initiative from MCA that all crew will have to be STCW certified in future, instead of five days courses in Antibes. Human lives are precious, and in order to prevent future accidents like this, only highly skilled and experienced crew has to be employed, and paid ffor offcourse. No offences taken guys.
John Doe
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 3:04 AM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 60


You mean like the Highly skilled commercial trained Italian Cruise ship Captain.
Nick Coombes
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 3:45 AM
Joined: 06/05/2010
Posts: 9


Ouch!!!! Nice come back. Greece is Feb is not really a pleasant place to be, and from the looks of the conditions in the Video (very few white caps) it looks like a typical day, force 4 or 5, certainly not a force 8. Whatever happened to the vessel will come out eventually. Hats off to the Captain and crew for getting everyone off safely. Boats can be re-built, lives, once lost, will never come back.
Mike
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 3:52 AM
Joined: 15/11/2010
Posts: 37


you know what. . . NONE of you were there, and all I can say is I am glad everyone made it off safe, and hopefully it will come out in detail so we can all learn from it. . shit happens.
Moleisk
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 4:27 AM
Joined: 24/03/2011
Posts: 4


I am just clad everyone on board made it off the vessel, at least the captain did not get of first like they do in the commercial industry, congrats to captain and all the crew for getting there guest off safe and sound, those STCW courses must have paid off.
well la de da
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 4:47 AM
Joined: 20/10/2010
Posts: 2


Um, 60m boat 8 crew, where were the rest of the crew?
Bear
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 5:45 AM
Joined: 05/06/2008
Posts: 11


She does seem to have plenty of stability when she's lying on her side like that. Look at the thing. Is it any wonder these systems integration critical boats get into trouble?
cristiano
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 6:28 AM
Joined: 03/02/2010
Posts: 4


I get so abset to see boats sinking all the time.. what is wrong with thw boat industry??? Lets start to take care with important things, that is usally just drinking and party!!!!
Capt. Dale
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:01 AM
Joined: 14/09/2008
Posts: 4


3 cheers for the Greek Rescue Team. Let them keep the Euro.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:43 AM
Yogi = Turkish shipyard ... I've been there and can testify how poorly they build boats. My bet goes for a technical failure.
Captaineric
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:57 AM
Joined: 20/06/2008
Posts: 1


Hi Dale, boat reporting mechanical failure, problem with exhaust. Probably water entering in engine room. List, bad weather with strong wind.... Professional crew on board doing delivery from shipyard to homeport. Excellent Hellenic Coast guard. Really sad to read comments posted by anonymous people. Are they armchairs Captain?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:03 AM
what I heard they have had a problem with muffler. Crew can be very lucky because they have been close to island, so now I have good question for all captains which can not wait to make crossing...Who will rescue you and your crew in mid of Atlantic? no one and no body! There is too much amateurs in this industry which don't respect sea, and the Rule no.1 is respect sea, and after follow COLREG's.
Capt Edward P
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:07 AM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


Having  watchd the video,  the first thing I noticed was that all lights were on everywhere and there was also a tell tale exhaust of a  generator pumping out its cooling water. Look carefully as the helico approaches and   starts to deploy its winching strop. This to me indicates that the engine room was not  flooded.  As to the cause,  I am afraid I think  its got to be  a hull breach and most likley is that it hit a  rock, I cannot see how the Captain cites exhaust failure  to sink the yacht when clearly the engine room is not flooded and gennies were still running.  Full marks to the Greeks though  for the rescue - would not have liked to have been a generator running at that tilt.   I wonder how deep the sea was there and whether a  recovery will be at all possible - furthermore am amazed a charter was on in February.  Yours 'aye   Cap'n Ed   hideousfrance.com

Capt Edward P
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:11 AM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


I also remember when looking for a numberplate once, that YOGI is a God of some sort,  for Indian religion I think.  Shame the divine intervention did not work in this instance- I wonder who insures this boat.?  (EDIT  since writing this  someone has said the boat was on a  delivery which is why  the "guests" as mentioned by BI  were obviously just delivery crew)

gareth.griggs
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:28 AM
Joined: 02/12/2010
Posts: 24


As previously mentioned, thank god everyone was rescued so promptly and are all safe. Easy for the rest of the delinquents to sit behind the safety of their 'anonymous' laptop on their bunk until such a catastrophe happens to them, I assure you no matter who you are or your position aboard you will catch a wake up and your huge ego will be stunted. And as for "probably it was english-sa,crew-on this boat,ican beth,all profesionals(backpackers)." grow up will you!
junior
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:46 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Jeez...that brand new Gin Palace just rolled over and sank ! Possible poor charter season outlook sparked Hari Kari ??? Obviously a watertight bulkhead , flood able volume issue. Ill bet the designer is looking for a new job. And ....what a mess...Id hate to be downwind of all that Gin Palace juice oozing out . I say stinkies are simply to dangerous...either they burn up at the dock , roll over and die at sea , do a COSTA and run into land masses or the bank repo's em' and everyone gets sacked. Best stick with sailing yachts...they shine downwind in a force 5
junior
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:52 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Oh and this is the ships layout. Check out all the water tanks... Gin Palace swimming pool nonsense...aft, over the steering gear.. YIKES..... http://www.proteksan-turquoise.com/images/stories/plans/NB49_60.20m-YOGI.pdf
Matt
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 9:23 AM
Joined: 11/02/2011
Posts: 8


I know about Turkish shipyards. I was on a 65 mt. yacht built not far from this one (delay of 13 months, so we had time to check). As officer I was always warning everybody about deficient safety and security issues. Watertight doors not so tight, fire doors slid on their own, etc. We also burnt an exhaust on our maiden trip, went back. In the end we made it to South France. But I can imagine, even if we did have a professional/experienced crew, things can get very nasty. I wonder if the now safe crew, will ever get to sea again. 
Stewardessbible
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 9:37 AM
Joined: 10/11/2011
Posts: 33


Scary stuff!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 2:03 PM
How about we stop arguing about who is a better mariner.  Accidents happen in every aspect of the maritime industry.  Offshore rigs, deep sea commercial, cruise liners, and yachts.  And within every aspect of the industry we have poor management hiring poor crew.  If we all need to argue about whether your time aboard ship was more important than someone with high quality training dedicating their time yacht management hardly gets us anywhere. 

My questions is, how bad could things have been?  Wouldn't this be a two compartment vessel?  Even if the exhaust went, the engine room has w/t doors.  Even if it hit a rock, close the water tight doors.  Are boats really this poor that w/t subdivision has become an excess cost? 

Bruce Kennedy
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 2:32 PM
Joined: 15/02/2011
Posts: 1


Was it not Captain Cook that hit a reef and saved his ship from sinking by spreading a sail over the outside of the hole in the hull?? Way way back in the day. Well... How about scrunching up a big ball of gladwrap/cling film and stuffing that.. Spreading that.. There's always a way
Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 4:40 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
How about we stop arguing about who is a better mariner.  Accidents happen in every aspect of the maritime industry.  Offshore rigs, deep sea commercial, cruise liners, and yachts.  And within every aspect of the industry we have poor management hiring poor crew.  If we all need to argue about whether your time aboard ship was more important than someone with high quality training dedicating their time yacht management hardly gets us anywhere. 

My questions is, how bad could things have been?  Wouldn't this be a two compartment vessel?  Even if the exhaust went, the engine room has w/t doors.  Even if it hit a rock, close the water tight doors.  Are boats really this poor that w/t subdivision has become an excess cost? 


This poor and worse; even better, there are societies like Lloyds where you can bribe your way through the certification, either that or they just don't care. I had to do over a million dollars worth of design and engineering changes to a NEW 33M Kingship Magellan, in order to KEEP the Lloyds Maltese Cross (Maltese Cross on a Lloyds Cert indicates that it was a survey process certificate, lack of the cross indicates that it was built with materials from an approved list, they don't care if they are applicable in size, material or function for the application, just that they have been approved as materials) certificate Lloyds issued the boat at the factory a year prior and the 5 years prior to that the boat sat around for sale as a spec boat.

The fact is that most yachts are of inferior condition on the seaworthiness end because everybody is worried about cutting some costs here and there where nobody will see it so they can spend more on the fluff that makes people go "Ooooo" and "Ahhhhh". Not letting the yards, designers and architects off the hook on this, but it's not all their fault. These "Floating Gin Palaces" as Junior likes to call them are what their buyers are ordering built, often being poorly advised by a broker who is typically not a highly competent or experienced seaman or engineer. Basically they want a luxury floating palace and that's what they get. If you're gonna risk your money building a 60M yacht, I wouldn't be doing it in Turkey or China, but they are the places where you can buy down your "structures" bill past the point of safety so you can stick more money into the $1000m2 carpet, gold fixtures and masterpieces on the wall.

I remember being onboard a yacht to do some work, it was an older large yacht, one of the old "Head of State" ones that was in such bad hull condition as I walked off the boat all I could think about was the wonderful art collection that was at risk, it was worth more than the boat that carried it.

junior
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 4:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Anonymous.... the question is .... Has goofy charter boat nonsense styling created unseaworthy ships. I cant see any way that a " mechanical failure" could possible sink the yacht I run. Too many waterproof bulkheads...to little flood able volume... to affect stability. The topheavy , window festooned, swimming pool clad Megayacht Yogi rolled over and died. She was new...obviously designed and regulated by competent authorities and manned with professional crew.
2@dad
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 5:12 PM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 3


Whatever the nationality of the crew , but it's a very bad news for me and the French's community
Yogi was the master-piece of the new French flag for yacht (Rif)

very bads news again..........................

Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 5:18 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Junior, while a single mechanical failure is unlikely or even impossible to sink your yacht, you are not immune from them. Accident chains often have a couple modest mechanical failures when compounded and toss in a natural condition issue to parlay it with and you have the 6 links of your accident chain and a casualty of some type. As you point out, the charter market of people looking for a luxury floating condo on the Riviera creates designs that already have 4 links of an accident chain preforged and waiting to go.

sizzler2008
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 6:00 PM
Joined: 26/10/2008
Posts: 4


I've been an engineer on another 60meter produced by this yard. We found a catalog of horrors in the engine room, pipe work using dissimilar metals etc. And the general finish of the exterior of the yacht was very poor quality. If your going to build a yacht don't do it in Turkey all they are interested in is cutting corners and saving money. I met the crew of Yogi in Monaco and they where a fantastic bunch, I hope they are all fit and well and being properly looked after by the owners and management.


Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 6:14 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


sizzler2008 wrote:
I've been an engineer on another 60meter produced by this yard. We found a catalog of horrors in the engine room, pipe work using dissimilar metals etc. And the general finish of the exterior of the yacht was very poor quality. If your going to build a yacht don't do it in Turkey all they are interested in is cutting corners and saving money. I met the crew of Yogi in Monaco and they where a fantastic bunch, I hope they are all fit and well and being properly looked after by the owners and management.


I'll echo the same advice for China, same issues only worse. The problem is owners, it's their money and they will spend it where they please on what THEY think is important. If you have an experienced owner they will often have different priorities than new owners. New owners aren't necessarily bad about it either, depends on their attitude and who their 'trusted advisors' are.

junior
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 6:22 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


only time will tell what cased a brand new boat, in moderate weather, to sink. It could be gross crew error, but I doubt it. Fools aren't promoted to yachts that size. The captain was onboard for construction. Vessels are designed to withstand all anticipated damage. I suspect a design flaw. The flooded volume of the watertight bulkhead was too great. The yacht went stern down. I understand that Costa Concoria rolled over because the flooded volume of her punctured compartment was to great
Lauren
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:16 PM
Joined: 01/05/2008
Posts: 51


The following statement was issued by Proteksan Turquoise:

"Istanbul, Turkey. February 17, 2012
 
Proteksan Turquoise, builders of the 60 metre MY Yogi, regrets to report that the yacht sank off the coast of the island of Skyros, Greece on the morning of February 17. The yacht had left the shipyard in Turkey, where it had been undergoing some guarantee re-paint work, on February 15th and was on her way to the Mediterranean when it was hit by gale force weather conditions off Skyros. All eight crew members were rescued by a Puma helicopter from the Hellenic Coast Guard and are presently safe on Skyros, where they will stay until being transferred to Athens.
 
It is unclear at the moment as to what caused the vessel to sink and that will not be known until representatives from the shipyard have been able to speak to the Captain and crew, which should take place over the next two days. MY Yogi was built to MCA rules and also to French Registry safety standards and the construction was under ABS surveillance and classification.
 
Preteksan Turquoise would like to thank everyone who has assisted in the rescue of the crew members, especially the Hellenic Coast Guard for the utmost skill and bravery they have shown during this unfortunate incident."

Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 7:58 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


junior wrote:
only time will tell what cased a brand new boat, in moderate weather, to sink. It could be gross crew error, but I doubt it. Fools aren't promoted to yachts that size. The captain was onboard for construction. Vessels are designed to withstand all anticipated damage. I suspect a design flaw. The flooded volume of the watertight bulkhead was too great. The yacht went stern down. I understand that Costa Concoria rolled over because the flooded volume of her punctured compartment was to great


I found in a stability letter of a yacht under commercial survey under Lloyds/Cayman's using LY2; "Breach of the forward compartment with full fuel in the forward tank will lead to loss of the vessel."

IOW, this was still an acceptable design even though it didn't pass damage stability requirements. As long as there is a note in the manual, it's all ok.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:11 PM
Did engineer forget to check engine room?????????? by engine watch every hour?Maybe it would help somewhere
yachtgoat06
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:15 PM
Joined: 24/03/2009
Posts: 2


Capt Edward P wrote:
Having  watchd the video,  the first thing I noticed was that all lights were on everywhere and there was also a tell tale exhaust of a  generator pumping out its cooling water. Look carefully as the helico approaches and   starts to deploy its winching strop. This to me indicates that the engine room was not  flooded.  As to the cause,  I am afraid I think  its got to be  a hull breach and most likley is that it hit a  rock, I cannot see how the Captain cites exhaust failure  to sink the yacht when clearly the engine room is not flooded and gennies were still running. 

Yeah, that's why Yachts (ships as well) have Emergency Gensets mounted high up on the 01 deck or higher. However they are not usually water cooled at that height. Also exhaust would not usually exit that far forward if it was one of the engineroom gens. Guessing it is a deck drain or something else puking water out. Also good chance that alot of those lights are 24vdc.

Lots of Arm Chair Captains around here today!

Henning
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:26 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Capt Edward P wrote:
Having  watchd the video,  the first thing I noticed was that all lights were on everywhere and there was also a tell tale exhaust of a  generator pumping out its cooling water. Look carefully as the helico approaches and   starts to deploy its winching strop. This to me indicates that the engine room was not  flooded.  As to the cause,  I am afraid I think  its got to be  a hull breach and most likley is that it hit a  rock, I cannot see how the Captain cites exhaust failure  to sink the yacht when clearly the engine room is not flooded and gennies were still running.  Full marks to the Greeks though  for the rescue - would not have liked to have been a generator running at that tilt.   I wonder how deep the sea was there and whether a  recovery will be at all possible - furthermore am amazed a charter was on in February.  Yours 'aye   Cap'n Ed   hideousfrance.com


Wow, you just made a world record setting jump to a conclussion. All the things you cite I would also expect to see during an emergency as there are emergency systems onboard large yachts to do all the things you are talking about when the engine room floods and is out of commission.



Jetman
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:53 PM
Joined: 18/02/2012
Posts: 1


Every one loves to put there oar in when it comes to events like this, it will be the topic of conversation for years to come around the crew mess table, bars ETC. You'll hear someone say i know such and such who worked on Yogi and they said !!!!. Truth is you'll never really know until the report get published.

I see people on here say there are to meny inexperienced crew about, maybe there is, experience is built on working and having a good selection of mentors around you to guide, teach and show the way in any field. Truth be told, there are a lot of new people in the industry of yachting. Perhaps one should think about the acceleration of the number of large yachts that have come upon the seas over the last decade and filling these vessel with crew is a hard task when requiring experianced crew, there just not out there. Gaining a licinece is not the be all and end all!. I've come across people with commercial engineering tickets who can come across to you as been outstanding, but put them in a situation or ask them to fix something and they have no idea, as its outside of what the read in the classroom. Same goes for captains. One of the main problems is ego's, there is now place for them in yachting or any vessel that goes to sea. Don't forget there is always someone better than YOU !

I have just downloaded and looked at the plans for Yogi and I would advise any one who wants to pass comment on how it sank, take a look also.

Happy sailing everyone and here's to a great safe season

Capt Edward P
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 9:36 PM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


I agree with Junior.    Some more info from the French on the toyboy involved, interesting to see which hotels he runs  ( not you Junior!)    NB post edited for html corruption but otherwise intact.


VIDEOS. Nouvelle avarie pour l’homme d’affaires Stéphane Courbit. Le Yogi, le mega-yacht lui appartenant, a coulé vendredi au large de la Grèce. Lancé en mars 2011 par un chantier naval turc mais battant pavillon français, le navire de 60 mètres de long a été victime d’avaries mécaniques lors d’une tempête, entre les îles de Skyros et Psarra, en mer Egée selon une information révélée par Paris-Match. Stéphane Courbit est un entrepreneur riche, talentueux mais peu connu du grand public : peu de photos, pas d’interviews. Fils d’un employé de banque et d’une postière de la Drôme, un de ses plus beaux rêves vient de sombrer.

http://www.actuhightech.fr/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/24498_fsr_2_300x250_peopletv

Les huit hommes d’équipage ont été sauvés

D’abord couché sur le flanc, le Yogi a fini par couler. Les huit hommes d’équipage ont pu être sauvés lors d’une spectaculaire opération d’hélitreuillage, mettant en œuvre deux hélicoptères et une frégate de la marine grecque. En pleine crise budgétaire, ces images de l’armée venant au secours d’un yacht pour milliardaires n’ont pas manqué de susciter des commentaires acerbes à Athènes.

357.000 euros la semaine

Détenu par la société parisienne Lov NB 49, le Yogi était le plus récent fleuron de Lov Group Invest, la structure patrimoniale personnelle de Stéphane Courbit, propriétaire par ailleurs des hôtels de grand luxe Les Airelles à Courchevel et Pan Dei à Saint-Tropez. Depuis Monaco, son port d’attache, et via le site Internet www.yogiyacht.net, qui vient de s’interrompre, le Yogi était proposé à la location pour 357.000 euros la semaine en basse saison, 378.000 euros la semaine en période de pointe.

Stéphane Courbit doit trouver 143 millions d’euros

C’est un « nouveau coup dur » pour l’homme d’affaire Stéphane Courbit, commente Paris-Match, qui rappelle que ce « jeune loup des affaires », âgé tout de même de 47 ans, doit trouver 143 millions d’euros que la milliardaire Liliane Bettencourt avait investis l’année dernière dans son groupe et qu’il a promis de rembourser. Stéphane Courbit avait fait fortune au début des années 2000 en revendant sa société de production télévisuelle au groupeEndemol. Il est aujourd’hui actif dans les secteurs de l’audiovisuel, les paris sportifs, les jeux en ligne et la distribution d’électricité, comme le rappelle l’hebdomadaire.

800 mètres carrés d’appartements

Le super yacht comprenait 800 mètres carrés d’appartements privés à la décoration inspirée de l’île de Bali, pouvant accueillir 12 personnes, réparties entre six cabines. En saison, l’équipage se composait de quinze personnes, dont cinq marins chargés de la navigation et de la maintenance et deux mécaniciens



steve w
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 8:24 AM
Joined: 02/05/2011
Posts: 3


Interesting to see the picture on the daily mail's site showing the front stabiliser hanging off.... technical issue?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102681/Going-going-gone-French-sailors-plucked-safety-boat-sinks-Greek-island.html?ITO=1490


junior
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 9:23 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Dont know much about the rotation limits of stabilizers. They are often used to keep the Palace quite at anchor so I would expect a wide rotation arc. . A statement by a Stinkpot Specialist in a well respected Gin Palace Journal ...... “If they lose power, they lose their stabilizers. Without stabilizers and steerage, they end up in beam seas. You get a cyclic roll that will eventually cause them to roll over. "...... If this is indeed true then I recommend that all crew wear survival suits when riding onboard these multideck beasts.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 1:45 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


steve w wrote:
Interesting to see the picture on the daily mail's site showing the front stabiliser hanging off.... technical issue?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102681/Going-going-gone-French-sailors-plucked-safety-boat-sinks-Greek-island.html?ITO=1490



I'm not seeing it, which picture do you see it hanging off? The only pic I'm seeing a stabilizer in it looks about where I'd expect to see it, rotated to a stop.

heevahova
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 2:39 PM
Joined: 12/07/2010
Posts: 58


Shipyard spokesman reports 7 hours from first distress call to time of video without capsizing and suggests that there was time for the vessel to be saved. I would tend to agree. This is not the first vessel loss that could be attributed to mariners not competent to operate the vessel. .Says Karabeyoglu, “At first we thought all these things happened fairly quickly. But the mayday was 00:30, and the rescue happened at 07:30. In my opinion perhaps [there was] crew panic – it’s easy to say from a distance of course, although in the dark in a Force 8-9, with the boat rolling, it is different, and it was cold and snowing.”
junior
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 3:20 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Careful Hee Haw...every shipyard claims Operator Error and every Insurance company claims gross negligence when a big stink sinks, flares off or runs wild at the dock. Industry standards require that designers , regulatory authorities and builders recognize the inherent incompetent of Gin Palace operators when building a new charter stink . This accident indicates a design flaw.
Gary
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 7:55 PM
Joined: 03/04/2010
Posts: 2


jadran74 - I see that you are under the impression that all yachties are just "weekend warriors". To this I kindly say BS !!!!! you are on a "yachties" website so you must fall in to this same category. With over 20 years of aviation maintenance experience and over 10 years of yachtie experience as an engineer (currently on a 54-meter similar to M/Y YOGI) , I find your comment to be not only offensive and ignorant but pretty dam stupid!!!! Yes, some newbies in this industry have to be accounted for but if you are implying that the captain and the chief engineer of the M/Y YOGI are weekend warriors then I kindly suggest that you go peddle your crap elsewhere!!!! I had the pleasure of meeting both at the Monaco boat show last year (2011) and found both to be extrtemely professional. As the chief engineer on a motor yacht similar in size and build as M/Y YOGI, I was impressed at the caliber of person that I met in the brief time spent with these two crew memebers at that show. It is due to them that my boss is STILL looking to the same builder to make his next motor yacht. Mr. jadran74, maybe you should stick with what you know in your commercial world and STAY AWAY from those of us that make our liviing in the world of professional yachting . . . . we really don't need you to spread your thougts in our world !!!! Good day sir.
pfrasse
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 7:58 PM
Joined: 16/02/2012
Posts: 1


Capitaine Philippe FRASSE.
pfrasse@gmail.com
+33668390000


Je regrette les commentaires inopportuns de certains "armchairs captain" du forum ...
La compétence de l'équipage du Yogi ne saurait être mise en doute.
J'adresse un message de soutien à Jean Louis puis à tout les marins présent à bord lors de l'accident.

Solidairement,

Philippe FRASSE


Henning
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 9:49 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


junior wrote:
only time will tell what cased a brand new boat, in moderate weather, to sink. It could be gross crew error, but I doubt it. Fools aren't promoted to yachts that size. The captain was onboard for construction. Vessels are designed to withstand all anticipated damage. I suspect a design flaw. The flooded volume of the watertight bulkhead was too great. The yacht went stern down. I understand that Costa Concoria rolled over because the flooded volume of her punctured compartment was to great


I wouldn't go as far as saying that. I have no knowledge of this crew and am not casting any direct aspersions, but as a blanket statement I have seen the effects of nepotism come to poor end before so with no knowledge, I cannot rule gross incompetence out, though I doubt gross, just typical incompetence in general led to a condition that when a casualty occurred they did not have what resources required to fix the problem and get back seaworthy and underway. There's always multiple links in the accident chain that lead up to these casualties. Being on the insurance team doing the root cause analysis if they bother should prove to be an interesting job to have.

If you're going to be on a big boat on big water, you better know it backwards and forwards and be prepared to deal with what comes your way. In order for that boat to sink from an exhaust issue in the engine room, that indicates to me that they were unprepared to stand to sea. There is fault on the master regardless how this plays out especially since he was there for the build. He should have seen what was built and prepared a general damage control kit to handle the various major known contingencies that can sink your vessel, and exhaust issues are a know point of failure in damage control preparations. He can't claim he didn't have time to get things prepared. To commission a vessel into service without a damage control kit is a failure on the commissioning captain's (and in this case the commissioning engineer shares some of the load since it was his department's kit that was missing) part. Since the current captain in command was also the commissioning captain the best I read this, he wears a share of this casualty as does the build engineer for allowing something on his ship that was going to sink it.

That's what build captains and engineers are there for. There's always more than one way to do something, we bring the knowledge from experience modifying and repairing failures in service of what works at sea and what doesn't. What is great on the drawing board and in the shipyard gets people hurt in 10-12' seas. Not every shipyard worker and yacht designer is familiar with the sea. It's up to us to catch these failures before they get built into service.

junior
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2012 6:44 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Had beers with a Naval Architect last night and with a pencil plus a few napkin sketches he sank the Yogi by flooding the superstructure. He was critical of the designs ability to rapidly generate large flooded superstructure volumes.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2012 10:05 AM
I know everone is quickly jumping to mad conclusions, and of course until the official MAIB report (or french equvilant) is issued then we can only speculate. However having watched the video and read all of the posts on here and looking at the photo´s of the yacht on http://www.superyachttimes.com/editorial/33/article/id/5928/ my conclusion would be that the flooding could have occurred through the starboard side stern garage opening. Which can be seen on the last photo from the above mentioned website. It would not be the first time that garage seals have been breached, or not closed/locked correctly. I seem to remember a story from last summer about a yacht in the med almost foundering from taking in water through her tender garage. Just from the video it looks as if it was through the starboard stern quarter where the main list was occuring and subsequently was the first section to founder. Oh and just to fight back at everyone´s issue with ´´inexperienced´´ yachtcrew, for an industry with over 10.000 yachts worldwide and well over 50.000 crew members, i´d say the maritime safety record for yachts is not so bad. In fact apart from freak accidents involving single crew members i can´t think of a yacht losing its whole crew or passenger list due to inexperienced crew errors. The last 2 disasters i can think of, YOGI (Sinking) / GODSPEED (fire) have ended with all crew and passengers being rescued with no fatalities. This is in part down to the crew being trained correclty and of course in part to our saviours at sea.
 
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