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Will merchant engineering tickets disadvantage me?
RedGreenBlue
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 4:43 PM
Joined: 02/03/2011
Posts: 10


I am currently looking into getting my MEC3 engineering ticket in New Zealand. What I am wondering is how much I will be disadvantaged in the yachting sector by holding a merchant qualification as opposed to a MCA Y ticket? I am aware that after getting my MEC3 I can apply to the MCA for the CoE which will at least line me up with the MCA scheme. I have read that recruiting agencies often have no idea about merchant qualifications and i also see most jobs posted asking for yachting tickets, hence my question. Cheers for any pointers....
gio
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 5:18 PM
Joined: 07/01/2012
Posts: 13


any merchant ticket is worth much more instead MCA yachting ticket. With your merchant ticket you are professional seaman and you can be embark on any kind of ship(cruise,ro-ro ferries, bulk, tanker,LNG,LPG,off-shore ships,container ship,..ect). For example captain with yachting licence up to 3000GT on cruise ship or any other ship can be only deckhand or bosun. So don't think to much, always go for your merchant licences.
RedGreenBlue
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 5:21 PM
Joined: 02/03/2011
Posts: 10


I understand I have more options with the merchant ticket, but when it comes to working on yachts, will it be harder to find employment than with yachting tickets?
gio
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 5:40 PM
Joined: 07/01/2012
Posts: 13


I never had any problems to find a job with my merchant tickets, don't be confused what yachting agencies posting because many of them do not understand different between yachting and merchant ticket, all of them worked only in yachting industry and they don't have proper education to understand different.
Kmadou
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:29 PM
Joined: 19/12/2010
Posts: 5


Dear friend, go on on getting your Merchant Marine tickets and never hesitate for something! Your ticket is much more valuable than any other in the yachting industry! As far as I have worked all my companies (yachts) were very pleased to hear that I Have an stcw certificate as officer. If you work on a red ensign yacht better to get the MCA CoE as engineer not for any other reason but for having an EU member professional certification!

Dean
Posted: Monday, January 23, 2012 5:43 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


Merchant tickets hold great value, having said that a piece of paper is only as good as the person that it represents. I’ve worked long enough to know that performance on the job is what it is all about. You need only look at the latest significant maritime incident involving a cruise ship to realize that performance on the job is the only true measure of a persons qualification to perform a certain duty.
G. Threepwood
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 3:13 AM
Joined: 31/07/2009
Posts: 28


Get a merchant navy ticket! Apart from the fact that any deck/eng license that states all the appropriate STCW training sections and has a (Y) to it, ie all the MCA yacht licenses, will limit you to UK/Red Ensigngroup yachts only. No recourse open to you if you want to cross over to merchant/other flag states. More over, and I do think that this little known fact did did go unnoticed; on the new PYC (passenger yacht code, MCA coded 13-36 passengers) yacht licenses are not valid for top positions!! So there will be a sector opening in the yachting world that the MCA class IV (3000gt/3000kw) will be barred from.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 10:24 PM
definitely go and get your MEC3. I would suggest go a step further and hook into a commercial company for a few years who will assist you to get your MEC2 then MEC1. If you are around 18-20 now, you should have your chief's ticket before you are 30, and you can then do anything you want. For what its worth all the engineers on yachts 75m+ have commecial tickets, so if you have intentions of staying in the yacht industry long terms its worth the time to get the right qualifications. With an unlimited tickets you could go and work anywhere in the maritime sector, the money that is being made by some in Aus/NZ in the gas & oil industry would make your eyes water!
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 3:30 AM
Go for your MEC3, you wont be disadvantaged. like people have said its a little more useful if you move away from yachts later. Also if you do your time on commercial yachts you can go for your MEC2 later on (provided the sea time was with large enough engines). Also the price is a little more user friendly. Im doing my MEC2 next year in NZ after doing my MEC3 in 2005.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 2:09 PM
go for your merchant license, more advantages to it. Also try offshore if you have the chance, a mate of mine with merchant chief class 1 unlimited has switched to gas & oil industry, moolah is good there.

Bill
Posted: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 4:10 PM
Joined: 29/10/2008
Posts: 2


The quick reply is: NO disadvantage! Here is a little unknown fact: Even with a MCA ticket you would still need a COC from the Cayman Islands to work on a CI flagged yacht. It is easier to get the CI COC holding a MCA license but as stated in the other posts it is limited to yachts. You might have to do some STCW and MCA classes for the COC but the pay offs are well worth it. I hold a USCG 1600/3000 ton ticket and spent a lot of time and money to then get the MCA Y4 before I knew this. As an American I doubt if I will ever run a British flagged yacht. The Cayman Islands COC has served me well and am sure it will serve most crew that already has a recognized "ticket" be it navigation or engineering. For the USA, Canadians, Kiwis and Aussies that can get there commercial license this is a big advantage. As far as the crew agencies, they are catching on to the this !
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, February 1, 2012 2:28 AM
Where in Miami or Fort Lauderdale can you go to get the training needed for your merchant/commercial licenses rather than just the yacht license?

I am moving there soon, and I want to continue my eduacation.  In the yacht route I have my STCW and Deckhand Yacht Rating.  In the merchant section I have my international Utility Licenses, and I have been on a 200+ ton boat for about one year. 

Henning
Posted: Wednesday, February 1, 2012 3:34 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Anonymous wrote:
Where in Miami or Fort Lauderdale can you go to get the training needed for your merchant/commercial licenses rather than just the yacht license?

I am moving there soon, and I want to continue my eduacation.  In the yacht route I have my STCW and Deckhand Yacht Rating.  In the merchant section I have my international Utility Licenses, and I have been on a 200+ ton boat for about one year. 


Nowhere really. In the US the training part of it goes on either onboard ship for those who 'hawse pipe' their way up and at the maritime academies which run 4 year degree programs where you graduate with an entry level unlimited license. The 'schools' such as we see in So Fla are there to teach you the tests you need to pass to get the license, not really to teach you the skills required for the job. As far as the test taking part of the learning goes, I'm sure MPT will have a program, you might also check with Star Center in Dania, I have no clue what they're offering these days. For the most part though, the commercial end of the industry isn't much in South Florida. The best deals on the commercial end are schools in Louisiana where you can do all these course for the cost of community college tuition rather than boutique private school prices (I did all my STCW 95 including BRM & GMDSS for $175. I could have taken any other courses/classes during that trimester as well for the same total cost). For large unlimited ratings though, the best shot you have is through one of the academies.

gio
Posted: Wednesday, February 1, 2012 8:06 PM
Joined: 07/01/2012
Posts: 13


My way to have merchant ticket was 4y of Nautical high School and 4y of Nautical Academy which is 8y of school to be professional seaman...and for me is so funny when I see how it works for MCA in few months of course and sea service you becoming captain....but in near future by IMO merchant ticket will be mandatory even for yacht (over 500GT), so who have chance to get merchant tickets go for it.
Kiel Mans
Posted: Saturday, March 1, 2014 2:52 PM
Joined: 11/12/2013
Posts: 1


Hi, I have a MEC 3 and have just applied for my CoE form the MCA. Can anyone tell me weather I am likely to get a Y3 or Y4? As for my yachts (<500t) manning requirement I can only serve as CE within 60mi of safe haven but if I get a Y3 CoE Im sorted. Also if I only get the Y4 what is my fastest route up? Stay in commercial or switch to Y system? 


 
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