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restoring engine room diamond plates
happyman
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 9:34 AM
Joined: 13/09/2010
Posts: 9


Dear fellows, I need some advice about how to clean, polish and maintain the engine room plates? I appreciated any comment, thanks.
junior
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 5:22 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


If the plates are oxidized it means you have salt water leaks in the engine room. Fix the leaks. Difficult to do anything with oxidized plate. Cheapest to grab a circular saw, several sheets of plate and cut new ones. Alternatively, if you are in the shipyard, you can sandblast the floor plates, prime and spray Awlgrip silver. Awl grip silver plates are very long lasting. Always screw the plates to a sheet of ply before blasting or they will deform.
MarineDex
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 8:34 PM
Joined: 22/04/2010
Posts: 45


I guess it depends on the finished required in the engineroom one boat that I worked one we just cleaned them,  scratched them with a sander using some disc's that look like the pads you clean the deck with and sprayed them with a couple of cans of Hammarite metal spray paint. It isn't the perfect finish by it's super cheap and easy for one of the deck crew or a dayworker to do.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 6:51 PM
Welder's pickling paste, brush it on and then hose it off. Roll a coat of grey Hammerite if they are not polished stainless.
scottytheyachty
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 7:38 PM
Joined: 19/06/2008
Posts: 6


lightly sand blast and powder coat them. then just wash with soap when needed.
CaptErik
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 12:21 AM
Joined: 09/09/2008
Posts: 64


sandblast and then awl grip. thats what we did. Don't do this if you plan on throwing crap around. As others stated if you sandblast, be careful, you can warp the plates, by being heavy handed. I do not recommend powder coating due to the difficulty to repair.
rodsteel
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 10:25 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


A 4 x 8 foot sheet of 3/16 inch polished aluminum seems to cost about $300. At what point does it become more economical (and less effort), to cut and drill new plates (or even order new pre-cut plates)?

 

Rod

 


Henning
Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2012 2:03 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


junior wrote:
If the plates are oxidized it means you have salt water leaks in the engine room. Fix the leaks. Difficult to do anything with oxidized plate. Cheapest to grab a circular saw, several sheets of plate and cut new ones. Alternatively, if you are in the shipyard, you can sandblast the floor plates, prime and spray Awlgrip silver. Awl grip silver plates are very long lasting. Always screw the plates to a sheet of ply before blasting or they will deform.


No, Aluminium will form a protective coat of oxidation about 2 seconds after you scratch it off in clean pure dry air. Corrosion indicates caustic contamination.

My favorite thing to do with deck plates is take them to the Rhino Liner guy and have them sprayed with that, it's pretty bullet proof. I use it as deck paint on steel work boats and it holds up great.

happyman
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 8:19 AM
Joined: 13/09/2010
Posts: 9


Thanks to all of your advices. Wish you all the best.
 
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