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Where are the Sailing Yachts ?
Laure
Posted: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 2:54 PM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Hi everybody !
After have been working on yacht last summer on a catamaran and on a motor yacht, my heart beats for sailing !
I would like to know where to go to find a job on sailing yacht ? During summer, Antibes is full of motor yachts. Do you know a place in the Med where the sailing are hidden ? During winter, it seems that the Carribean's are full of catamaran and sailing boats...
I was deck/stew and I want to work my way up to deckhand. Stewardess duties are not my cup of tea. I want to work outside and drive the tender, looking after a beautifull Swan or Wally And one day, become captain !
Anyway, I am currently doing a french course : Capitaine 200. I can get the equivalent in english : the Master 200.
It seems this certificate has a better level than the Yachtmaster. Is it true ?
Will I need lot of sailing skills to work on this kind of boats ? I was thinking to do some sailing courses... But I already know some basics !
Even with the Master 200, should I get the Power Boat Level 2 ?
Sorry for all these questions !
Thanks a lot for your futur answers.

Fair Wind !

L.

junior
Posted: Thursday, December 15, 2011 7:50 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Important to realize that there are not many sailing yachts ....the sea is jam packed with gin palaces. Im the only crewed sailing yacht in the entire harbour. Concerning yacht center locations, places like The South of France have the worst sailing conditions you can imagine...light wind and a lumpy , angry sea kicked up by great herds of stampeding stink pots running parallel to the coast. The anchorages are swept by gin palace wakes and terrorized by goons on jet skis. The sailing yachts you see in the south of France are typically dead...up for sale. Palma has a far greater density of active sailing yachts because the Bay of Palma , with its thermal wind, is a superb day sailing area. Give Palma a look. As for actually meeting sailors and networking.... Sailors are different. They actually like water and boats . During work time sailors are on the yacht , when free time arrives they sail at the club. If you cruise the yachty locations , networking, you will only meet stinking crew sitting on bar stools comparing tickets , pay checks, PYA membership and gee wizz five star goofiness...the sailors will be invisible because they are down at the sailing club sitting on a windward rail comparing sail trim or keel profiles. If you prefer to be involved with sailing yachts make it a habit to check out local sailing clubs and get involved. Check out the big sailing regattas and get involved. Get to know the people and get your face known. As for Tickets...with sailors we work in reverse...first we become competent, then we pick up the paperwork. Do your safety course , then get to work learning how to be a seaman. To be a sailor you must like what you do and be good at what you do.
Laure
Posted: Friday, December 16, 2011 9:58 AM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Thank you for advices Junior ! I know, sailing is a passion, not just a job...
Last summer I saw some big sailing yachts in Monaco, but, as you said, they go somewhere else to cruise, to find some good wind
I will have a look to Palma then. Is it easy to dockwalk there ?
Thanks a lot.

Laure

junior
Posted: Friday, December 16, 2011 10:42 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Dockwalking is possible but always demoralizing. Another viable route is to sign on as crew for a private ,family operated ,sailing yacht. These can be very good positions and women are many times prefered. Search for one that will give you watch standing responsibilities. Good yacht brokers are the contact point for this type of position .
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, December 17, 2011 1:01 PM
Hi Laure, Just curious, why a sailing yacht?
Capt Edward P
Posted: Saturday, December 17, 2011 1:41 PM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


Junior has it right here and has mentioned all the things I was going to say so no need to repeat. Generally I think sailors are nicer people on the whole, and I have only met two people in my life who buck this rule. They are less complicated people I have found, and happy to tool along at 8 knots in a nice little breeze with a nice inclination on the boat, rather than a furious gas guzzling dash to the next bay-stuffed-with-yet-more superyachts. Owners tend to me more skilled, trying to get the best out of water and nature, unlike stinkpot owners who are all brash and cash. This takes me back to Monaco Yacht Show in 2005 when the organisers had sandwiched in a very pretty little yacht of around 70 feet at an angle where two pontoons met, the crew looked uncomfortable amongst the stinks and I felt sorry for them in a way. However, if its a gorgeous boy you are looking for, sailor chaps tend to be much more toned and ripped due to the pulling on sheets, raising sails etc, rather than their stinkpot counterparts who merely have to push a rheostat gearlever to actuate the throttles and do things by motor or servo - and tend to look fitter and more happy. The fact you are interested in coming off a stinker shows you want a better life and I believe you might be able to find one in many ways - although I am just waiting to be flamed by stinkies here ! I agree with Junior about the sailing conditions in South of France and so agree about Palma. Get Powerboat Levels 1 and 2 and VHF Radio license, and make sure you can sail a dinghy, so that if you are asked to take the wheel that you can steer the yacht if need be without making a balls-up Good luck. Cap'n Ed
Andy
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2011 6:29 PM
Joined: 28/04/2009
Posts: 2


well said chaps......sail ho!!
Jure
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2011 7:26 PM
Joined: 28/01/2010
Posts: 6


Hi there all of you, it's my first post on the forum altough I've been checking out whats up for a long time now.. I'm from Croatia's Adriatic coast, more specifically from Dalmatia. Based on all the info I collected I'm also looking forward to work on sailing yachts rather than motor ones, tough as an engineer candidate I'm not quite sure about future duties on a S/Y in a range between 30 and 40m, maybe the rigging adds something special up? I got to a conclusion that getting deck watch papers (stcw watchkeeping, ARPA, GMDSS, etc.) wouldn't harm me as many engineer duties on such vessels tend to be dual watch ones. Currently I'm studying for marine engineering diploma and making teak decks and exteriror furniture for livnig for a small company in my town. Well, that's pretty much it, cheers!

junior
Posted: Monday, December 19, 2011 7:14 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


You're wise to pursue Marine engineering. The big sailing yachts are engineering intensive....so intense that skilled engineers shun them and concentrate on motoryachts. Hydraulics and their controll systems are complex and dominant on sailing yachts...if you have an opportunity to improve your knowledge of hydraulic systems, you will become very valuable.. It also helps to be only one meter tall with very long arms and hands like vise grips if you sail as engineer.
Jure
Posted: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 4:24 PM
Joined: 28/01/2010
Posts: 6


Thank you Junior! Actually at 180 pounds and 6' 3" of mine I suppose I'll have my fair share of bumping wherever I go (and I dont even bother hoping to get one day on Phocea or Maltese Falcon or similar size of top sailing yacht.... ), but for the rest of your post I'll try to make a good use of the tip you gave me!

Laure
Posted: Monday, January 2, 2012 9:10 PM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Thank you everyone for your advices.
I wish you lot of happiness, health, travels and good winds on sailing boats !


Henning
Posted: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 2:14 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Laure wrote:
Thank you everyone for your advices.
I wish you lot of happiness, health, travels and good winds on sailing boats !


It you really want a sailing boat, have you looked around the Pacific market? Tahiti is a big 'crew change' spot. You can also get good sailing experience hanging around the yacht clubs for the 'beer can races', we'd pull people off the dock all the time to make up crew.

junior
Posted: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 4:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


As a sailor, a very good place to ply your trade is the West Coast of the US. The sailing conditions between America and the Pacific are rugged. Americans are much too soft and jelly bellied to handle it. No WiFi and youre gonna get wet.. The whole scene is dominated by Kiwi s, SA's and Australians. Naturally you must dodge Homeland security and jealous ,unemployed ,American Yachties, but the scene is Hot. Put it on your list. NOW. Forget Lauderdale...the place is full of unskilled xenophobic Big Mac chomping crew and it stinks.
MarineDex
Posted: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 7:33 PM
Joined: 22/04/2010
Posts: 45


As someone who can say he ticks the boxes of Junior list of requirements listed above. I would recommend that if you love sailing yacht try to stick to something less than 100ft since owners of larger boats don't really get the sails out often, and it really isn't sailing when you get to big since you'll spend more time motoring then sailing. It's also a great way to learn everything from driving, managing, repairing, and refitting the yacht. It will also give you a better understanding of how things work and why. With usual a less busy program then most in the industry especially on Wally's and Swan's this will give you the time to do more racing and sailing on other people's boats as well as time to pull things apart and put them back together again learning your trade the hard way. Once you have done too many years that you wish you could take it all back. Then go and sit some bigger tickets then the Yachtmaster which seems to more a requirement for deckhands’ roles these days than anything else.

To find these boats head for the Rolex regatta hang out in the bars; beg, bribe and stow away on any boat that you can get on for free. Get the experience of not only being part of the team but also learning from the best sailors in the world who follow these circuits. Stick to the attitude of I’m not leaving till someone gives me a job doing anything on board and soon enough someone will notice and give you the job you want. Let us know if you need some further help as well as email your CV to info@marinedex.com since most sailors find crew through word of mouth not through the agencies. For Med seasons check out the shipyards in Palma, La Ciotat, Savona, St Tropez and Genova around March when we get back from Skiing and Snowboard since most of the boats get pulled out during the winter giving us time to enjoy sports other than the usual water sports during the summer.

Best of Luck and safe sailing!



Henning
Posted: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 10:33 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


junior wrote:
As a sailor, a very good place to ply your trade is the West Coast of the US. The sailing conditions between America and the Pacific are rugged. Americans are much too soft and jelly bellied to handle it. No WiFi and youre gonna get wet.. The whole scene is dominated by Kiwi s, SA's and Australians. Naturally you must dodge Homeland security and jealous ,unemployed ,American Yachties, but the scene is Hot. Put it on your list. NOW. Forget Lauderdale...the place is full of unskilled xenophobic Big Mac chomping crew and it stinks.


LMAOSHTTRDML!!! There is a true piece of curmudgeon comedy! However if you are legal for the work, the US west coast does have a fair bit of sailing going on, but not much is paid. Good experience, but you need a day job. The only reason the industry is dominated by the SOSSC (Southern Ocean Sheep Shaggers Circuit) is because they work for dirt and speak English, kinda. Besides, it's not really true and there's plenty Americans out there sailing hard for next to no money as well; I know, I was there. That's why I don't do sail boats anymore, no money. That's also why sailors have to boast with a smug sense of false superiority, it's all they have.

Henning
Posted: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 11:04 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


MarineDex wrote:
As someone who can say he ticks the boxes of Junior list of requirements listed above. I would recommend that if you love sailing yacht try to stick to something less than 100ft since owners of larger boats don't really get the sails out often, and it really isn't sailing when you get to big since you'll spend more time motoring then sailing. It's also a great way to learn everything from driving, managing, repairing, and refitting the yacht. It will also give you a better understanding of how things work and why. With usual a less busy program then most in the industry especially on Wally's and Swan's this will give you the time to do more racing and sailing on other people's boats as well as time to pull things apart and put them back together again learning your trade the hard way. Once you have done too many years that you wish you could take it all back. Then go and sit some bigger tickets then the Yachtmaster which seems to more a requirement for deckhands’ roles these days than anything else.





I don't disagree with your statement being true but I disagree in using it as a requirement for deckhands; it's not fair to an unqualified deckhand. Look at the name of the ticket: Yachtmaster. Once you hold that rating you up the level of legal liability and scrutiny for the results of your mistakes. An error in judgement for a deckhand with a year's service is an accident of inexperience. For that same deckhand with a year and a Yachtmaster ticket, making the same mistake is now puts them up for manslaughter. Poor captains require a deckhand to hold a Yachtmaster unless they are running in command of a really big tender; anything else is covered by a PBII/Coxswain certificate. Personally at a year into it if a deckie comes to me with a YM I'm unimpressed; to me it shows poor judgement and/or ability to assess a critical situation. People also have a false impression that the US is a sue happy place, but everywhere and every one in what we call 'The West' is the best I can tell.

A big part of a captain's job is to bring crew up, not require crew to cover for them. Besides, if they have a YM ticket, they are no longer deckhands, they are mates and should be payed and collect seatime as such. That's another pet peeve I have in yachting, people with no license calling themselves 'mate'; mate is a licensed position.



junior
Posted: Wednesday, January 4, 2012 1:43 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Get a toe hold in the west coast scene by delivering the boats back home, Keep your name on the crew avaiable list. Learn how to cook and market yourself in this position plus Senior First Aid provider. . SAFETY AT SEA qualifications are required on race boats. http://offshore.ussailing.org/SAS/Seminars.htm http://sdyc.org/pv/ http://www.mexorc.com/ http://www.nosa.org/ http://www.lbyc.org/html/content.cfm?CID=1445 http://www.vicmaui.org/gallery http://www.transpacrace.com/ http://2012.swiftsure.org/
Laure
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 4:22 PM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Thanks a lot guys.
Yes I was thinking about Pacific, and the season is right now. But I am in a course to get the Master 200.
It will end up in March. So I will be back to Marseille or Antibes for the summer and I will follow your advices, I will probably go to Palma !
And after the season, I would like to do an Atlantic crossing to go to the Caribbeans and find a job there...
Do you think I can get a chance to work as skipper for thoses companies like moorings or sunsail ???
To be honnest, I have not lots of experience steering a sailling boat....
Thank you all !!!



Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 5:05 PM
this is what is wrong with the system..How can someone be getting there master 200 ton ticket and not have experience at the helm.. The system needs to be changed peoples sea time should be checked by the licencing authority just like we have to go through in Australia, they are quite strict on this and it is for this reason. No wonder yachting has a bad reputation if u have cash u pass the course dont worry about experience or sea time...things need to change.. As junior wrote get experience first then go for your tickets....
Laure
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 5:58 PM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Anonymous,

I forgot to tell : in France you go in a course for 5 months, learn about chart, forecast, engine, radar, radio, boat's lights, and you helm a 11m motor boat for 20h ( yes, it is not a lot).
To get in this course you have to have experience at sea (stew, engineer, deckie, bosun...) and a "deckhand number" that I have cause I spent 8 months at sea. The course cost 4000€.
Once you get your exams, you have to validate your "certificate" with 12 months of navigation as deckie. After that, the certificate will change into a real ticket.
For the Yachtmaster : you must have experience, get in a "just" 2 weeks course, pay 2500€ and you get your ticket.
I know couple of people who got their YM with just 1 month experience at sea cause they "cheat" or knew the YM school guy... What about that ???
Maybe my question about to skip a moorings/sunsails boats didn't make sense, but I saw on this forum captains telling to a newbie : go to Moorings to learn about helm and sail... ????
Yes my level is too low to steer a boat, but some cheap catamaran charter companies hire people with almost no experience. So in this story, I think that THOSE companies are wrong, not the guy who is looking for job or the ticket !!!!


Henning
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 10:18 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Laurie, those small boat charter companies are a great place to score your first job. Doesn't pay a lot and you work your arse off often, but you do get good experience and sailing out of it. As for the sending people there to learn, I'd suspect you misunderstood what he meant, I would imagine he was telling him to charter one to learn on since it's the cheapest best way to do it. Most captains running those boats will teach you to drive and it'll be cheaper than the schools.

Jure
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 8:27 PM
Joined: 28/01/2010
Posts: 6


few days ago I got a position over here for the season on a 90ft steel hulled ketch, as a deckie and unlicensed engineer. Small engine - 450hp, but the engine room is surprisingly quite comfortable for the size of the yacht. The good old buck is Adriatic standard, well a bit more than it, but still far, far less then West Med, but Im happy to finally start and get some experience beside classroom/simulator. Hopefully, in the end some good/useful references too. well, schools out for summer! heigh-ho

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 6:55 PM
"That's why I don't do sail boats anymore, no money. That's also why sailors have to boast with a smug sense of false superiority, it's all they have." good, bugger off then. go be "humble" on your stink pot and "all your money"
LARS DYCK
Posted: Thursday, March 29, 2012 12:14 AM
Joined: 02/05/2008
Posts: 1


HI LAURIE I'M A SAILOR TOO. SPEND 6 YEAR IN FORT LAUDERDALE LOOKING FOR A POSITION ON A YACHT. I PREFERED A SAILING YACHT, BUT IF THERE WAS A POSISBILITI TO GET ON A POWER YACHT , I NEVER HESITATED TO JUMP ON IT. I CAN ANDERSTAND YOU. IT WILL BE VERY DIFICULT TO GET A POSITION. I DO NOT WANT SCARRY YOU BUT MAKE YOUR START ON A POWER AND THEN LOOK FOR SAILING BOAT NEAR YOU AND TALK TO THEM THAT YOU ARE A SAILOR. I NEVER HAD THAT POSSIBILITY. AND TO ALL OF US IN THE INDUSTRY, NEVER FORGET THAT THE WORLD IS CONCERT BY SAILING SHIPS. WE ALL CROSS THE FINGERS.
Philip Demler
Posted: Thursday, March 29, 2012 2:15 PM
Joined: 15/03/2012
Posts: 2


Dear Laure,

we are a small crew agency, specializing exclusively on sailing yachts. There are many good sailing yachts out there, but of course compared to the motor yacht world it is a very small part of the business. We have made this part our focus, as we know this scene very well.

If you are still looking for a job, send us your CV to crew@demlermarine.com

Cheers,
Philip

Laure
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 7:08 PM
Joined: 27/12/2010
Posts: 35


Hi everyone !

Thank you all for your advices.
I am the happiest woman who just got her Capitaine 200 !   (Master 200GT)
I am in Antibes since saturday and I began the job : visiting all the agencies. And after that I will dockalk.
Thanks for the post Philip, I will send you my resume.
So, if you know some Motor/Sailing yachts which are looking for a motivated deckhand...

Cheers and have a lovely summer season !



Laure


Rusty Wrench
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2012 7:36 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Where are the sailing yachts? Stuck aground under 17st Causway bridge....
Alexia
Posted: Monday, May 7, 2012 8:29 PM
Joined: 06/05/2012
Posts: 5


Hi Laure, congratulations for your Capitaine 200 !! I've read some of your posts on the forum from last year when you were going to take the Stcw95 course and found a lot of useful informations thanks to you ! I'm now like you 1 year ago, getting ready for stcw95 and I find it quite confusing for a newbie to know whether you have to go for a french training or MCA one. Can you give me your opinion on the bluewater safety training in Antibes ? On this subject, I wanted to ask you why did you go for an english stcw95 training and for a french capitaine 200 ? Is it not a problem to mix certificates from different countries for your career? Sorry to ask all these questions ! But I feel I'm following the same path as you I'm highly motivated to work in this field and can't wait to start ! I hope to be a deckhand soon ! (or later cause the season is more than started but I have to try). Thank you and fair winds
 
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