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looking for my first job!
cbryne62
Posted: Saturday, November 26, 2011 11:51 PM
Joined: 26/11/2011
Posts: 1


i have owned a 38 ft fountain and grew up on the water and now would like to start a new carrier in this industry. I have worked 60-80 hrs a week for 20 years and unlike these youngsters am not affraid to work long hard hrs to succeed! Im willing to do whatever it takes to win! Whom every hires me will get a very honest,loyal,dedicated and faithfull employee.Willing to work for free to prove my abilities and dedication! Any advise or referals would be appreciated! Craig
rodsteel
Posted: Sunday, November 27, 2011 6:36 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Craig,

 

If you have not done so, I would suggest you check out a few of the threads in the "Getting Started" and "Advice Needed" forums on this site (could save a bit of time ).

 

Also, if you have not done so, you should probably obtain the STCW '95 Basic Safety Training certificate and get a Seafarer's Medical certificate (usually an ENG 1). Any further training courses will depend on whether you want to be a deckhand, steward, cook/sous chef or assistant engineer.

 

Good luck,

 

Rod

 

P.S. If you are American, also take a "Lifeboatman" course and use it to obtain a US Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Credential.

 


Chief
Posted: Sunday, November 27, 2011 10:00 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"Willing to work for free to prove my abilities and dedication!"

If that is all you value your abilities and dedication then don't expect work on a professionally operated yacht.

There is a huge difference between driving your own boat around for fun and working as a crewmember. Take a look at what is on offer at  http://www.floatplan.com/crew.htm and similar sites. There are no end of opportunities to find out if you really want to work on a boat or just ride around on a boat.

Make a few trips on a recreational boat, have some fun and get some experience at the same time then you will have more to offer than just free labor ... which generally makes people think they are getting what they pay for.

Good luck

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 10:47 PM
Finding a job in industry requires dedication and persistance. You can't under estimate the hard work involved but since the industry is more and more professional, getting the right certifications is also very important. It might be a good idea to make a appointment at a maritime school and get some carreer counseling, too.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 12:06 AM
Craig even with the safety training course a culinary degree and a BA in accounting and finance I could not get hired in this industry and I tried for three months. I am just warning you.. I have strawberry blonde hair blue eyes and would work for free but most yachts are being sold not going out.
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 3:33 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


cbryne62 wrote:
i have owned a 38 ft fountain and grew up on the water and now would like to start a new carrier in this industry. I have worked 60-80 hrs a week for 20 years and unlike these youngsters am not affraid to work long hard hrs to succeed! Im willing to do whatever it takes to win! Whom every hires me will get a very honest,loyal,dedicated and faithfull employee.Willing to work for free to prove my abilities and dedication! Any advise or referals would be appreciated! Craig


If that's your picture, fuggedaboudit; seriously. Sorry your chances of breaking into yachting at the green deckie level are really slim to nonexistent. 80 hr weeks? In this business126 is pretty standard when in service which can be weeks at a time on a busy charter boat. Even private boats, when the family is on, it's full on. If you have fishing knowledge or diving, look into that community. At your age you need some ratings and some real boat experience to get on a yacht. Look at big old wood sailboats. They always need people. Volunteer on one of the restoration/museum projects and learn some obscure but needed skills and make a niche for yourself. Sorry, you're just to old to get hired to pilot a chamois, you need to bring a real skill set.

Henning
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 3:42 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Anonymous wrote:
Craig even with the safety training course a culinary degree and a BA in accounting and finance I could not get hired in this industry and I tried for three months. I am just warning you.. I have strawberry blonde hair blue eyes and would work for free but most yachts are being sold not going out.

If you are US legal and in Fort Lauderdale, contact me at henning@caphenning.com; I may have something for you.

Capt Edward P
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 8:03 AM
Joined: 06/01/2011
Posts: 81


Whilst the whole point of a forum is for people to express their opinions, there have been some pretty harsh ones here. Presumably the "62" after the OP name is indicative of his birthyear we therefore can presume that his age is 50 which would seem about right from the photo. Firstly I would hope that the OP meant 'career' and not carrier - this sort of mistake is unlikely to go down with an owner ! My only point I want to make is yet again that all new entrants to this industry are up against some very good looking boys and gals from AUS/NZ and even UK/US. I have said it before that younger oil and telecoms oligarchs want to be surrounded by fit, gorgeous looking people on their lovely and sometimes not too lovely boats. Even if they cannot pett the staff, owners and their wives can sure take some satisfaction in eyeing up the eye candy of whatever sex they have working from them. My two pence, is that go for it but try and grab a look at someone else's CV first to see how it measures up to yours, and take courses to suit. If you're European, keep it MCA and make sure you do Level 1 and 2 powerboat so you can drive the tenders without the yacht having to pay for you to take them. STCW95 of course, maybe Fleet Rescue. Highlight any other skills eg scuba, that you can instruct on. Finally make sure your deck shoes are new and that you wear the right kit, a sharp haircut even at 50 still looks great. As some have said, even after three months' they did not find work, and they were blonde and blue eyed...... start at the right time of year and make sure you can finance the wait without looking down at heart, down at heel, and depressed. Good luck. Yours 'aye Cap'n Ed (hideousfrance.com)
John Doe
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 3:30 PM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 69


Craig, go with what you know. Most posters here would work on 145+ foot yachts, which is predominately occupied by young, not necessarily attractive, morons who can withstand tremendous heat and gruelling hours on little sleep . I would start with my own genre if i were you. It will be difficult but not impossible. If you are American, go get a USCG 100T license and grab yourself a small charter boat in the USVI's or BVI's. Then work up in size until the >100' range; then belly up to the bar and have a drink with all the nay-sayers. Ps, Change your photo, you gotta look the part. Good luck
directorbman
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:12 PM
Joined: 31/07/2011
Posts: 3


[Comment removed by moderator]

junior
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 5:03 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


[Comment removed by moderator]

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:33 PM
I've been told at 52 years old that I have been too old to be a Yacht Captain .... even though I hold Merchant Navy Captain Class 1 CoCs and CeCs. I have been sailing all my life: consequently as you are of an age which is older than me, with no real experience or certificates I would go home, get you slippers on and save the heart ache of constant rejection trying to get an entry level job in this industry - where the people that get these jobs average 21 years of age! I have gone back to the Merchant World and am now Commanding a VLCC! Yachting is a STRANGE, STRANGE world!!! LOL
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2012 7:31 PM
I am currently serving as Master on a 50,000 tonne chemical tanker. I am 54, and planning on retiring next year. Last summer I decided to give yacht skippering a shot to see if I'd like to do it as a second career in retirement. Unlike the poster above, I had no problem at all finding a slot. I own a 54' motorsailer, and simply called the manning agency that I have used many times when I've needed crew, either for help on sea passages or to do deliveries when I wanted to be able to pay off a ship and fly somewhere to cruise my own boat. They called me back with a job - a med-based motorsailer twice the size of my own - within a few days. Richard
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, March 3, 2013 6:53 PM

This may be of great help to you: "Super Yachting: The Beginners Guide." Just published in February 2013 and full of loads of useful advice. Definately worth downloading -  available on Amazon and Smashwords. Links below.

Good luck with it all!happy 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/SUPER-YACHTING-BEGINNERS-GUIDE-ebook/dp/B00BIHRZZ2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1362335659&sr=8-1  

http://www.amazon.com/SUPER-YACHTING-BEGINNERS-GUIDE-ebook/dp/B00BIHRZZ2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1362335756&sr=8-1&keywords=super+yachting  

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/287672  

 


 
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