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seeking advice
diesel1
Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2011 1:02 AM
Joined: 09/06/2011
Posts: 3


hello there..im looking into getting started in the yachting industry..im 25 and have been working boats my whole life. within the past 2 years i have worked as a engineer/ deckhand on tugboats in new york harbor, spend 4 months as an engineer on a oil spill response vessel during the bp oil spill. i have worked for a MAN diesel dealer as a mechanic and am currently working at a marina as a mechanic in new jersey. I currently hold a TWIC card and MMC with wiper endourcement, if that helps at all. Once I save up some more money i will be taking my stcw95, aec, and powerboat level 2. Now my question is..will it be wise for me to spend some time in south florida and walk some docks and pick up some day work? or should i stay in jersey and just search job listings? any advice will be appreciated. thanks
Henning
Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2011 12:36 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


diesel1 wrote:
hello there..im looking into getting started in the yachting industry..im 25 and have been working boats my whole life. within the past 2 years i have worked as a engineer/ deckhand on tugboats in new york harbor, spend 4 months as an engineer on a oil spill response vessel during the bp oil spill. i have worked for a MAN diesel dealer as a mechanic and am currently working at a marina as a mechanic in new jersey. I currently hold a TWIC card and MMC with wiper endourcement, if that helps at all. Once I save up some more money i will be taking my stcw95, aec, and powerboat level 2. Now my question is..will it be wise for me to spend some time in south florida and walk some docks and pick up some day work? or should i stay in jersey and just search job listings? any advice will be appreciated. thanks

I wish I could tell you things were better, but they're not. It's tough year, thing is searching "job listings" from afar is rarely successful. If you have a decent job with a real paycheck, I'd hang onto it for this year.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2011 8:55 PM
Don't listen to Henning. He will probably try to charge you for walking up his gangway.
John Doe
Posted: Saturday, October 29, 2011 9:41 PM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 69


There are a lot of different methods to securing a berth, mostly boils down to right time and place, sometimes even desperation....crew walk off day before sailing and pretty much the first kid on the dock gets his break. If money is tight, keep your existing job and try the agencies for a while. I wouldn't waste my time on a power boat course, you only get to fix em' not drive em'. If that doesn't pan out then try a different approach. In my experience, dayworkers albeit very necessary, tend to get type cast and and very few ever make the transition to permanent crew. Market yourself as an experienced crew member don't go the day worker route yet. If you are day working you can't look for a job, which in itself is a full time job. Dayworkers usually make enough to scrape through the better part of a season but very few of them make it through. Things are tight right now, but don't give up. Don't go to Florida broke, you will need at least 4 months of living costs, then double that for social interaction, transportation (yards are far apart) uniform (got to look the part) and what ever else pops up. Especially money for diet. You need to eat well to keep up your energy, keep the glow in your cheeks and to keep a positive mind. All to often crew looking run low on cash and the first thing they do is by Mac & Cheese and Noodle cups and a case of beer. Right away you start to get depressed and desperate. People can see that on you so definitely eat well and stay off the booze. It could be the separator. Create a killer CV and get it out there and see how that works for now. I once went to Florida only to get a phone interview because of my CV and ended up flying out to a distant location. I could have stayed home. You could spend take a quick trip down just to meet the agents,then return to your job. A source of income while you look will keep your search going longer. Good Luck
diesel1
Posted: Sunday, October 30, 2011 1:47 AM
Joined: 09/06/2011
Posts: 3


thanks for the info...that helps alot... i will be going down to the miami boat show so maybe ill stay a little longer and check out the agents and see whats what..again thanks for the input
FiveStarCrew
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 11:35 AM
Joined: 16/10/2010
Posts: 15


I might have to disagree with the previous post in that dayworking has huge benefits. It seems as though you have worked one particular side of yachting where luxury yachting can be very different. How are you supposed to learn without some daywork experience? Yes you have a boating background, as did I when I entered the industry, but that meant nothing in my case. I had to throw out everything I knew and learned to 'take orders' and stick to my job rather than jump when we were doing something I knew how to do, but it wasn't my job... had to stay under the table polishing the stainless and report in if I moved so my Mate knew where I was (at all times) rather than helping with the fenders, which I knew how to do... My daywork experience prepared me for a permanant crew position. I learned the products, the etiquette, the fact that you don't touch ANYTHING on board where you could possibly leave a fingerprint because someone had to clean it. I learned the feel of the industry where you can't have any idea without some previous experience. You can keep your expenses down but if you REALLY want in, it's beneficial to go where the boats are. Stay in a crew house (great networking), eat in to keep it cheap, book your time with agents, Captains just to 'brain pick', other crew to learn what they know... If you're American, the Miami boat show is OK as there are a bunch of local boats involved and some offshore-flagged. FLIBS, which just ended last weekend, was one of the best shows to dockwalk and get some time on boats/a permanent job. Now most boats are heading south for the winter season. Key point is, as you do not have specific luxury yachting experience, it is unlikely you will get hired from sending a resume to a job ad posted somewhere online. It is good to talk to the agencies as you will always learn something.. treat each agency interview as the real thing and dress the part... I could go on and on here. If you would like to stay home and see what kind of response you get with job postings, here is some help: Check Five Star Crew on Facebook - it has everything from steady jobs posts to a community page to where you can ask questions. And the most important bit - your resume. You will find an industry resume template here: www.fivestarcrew.ca - make sure it's perfect as this industry is about detail-orientation and perfectionism in everything you do from flower arranging to cleaning the engine room. Best of luck to you - budget your time and money and you should do fine Karen Murray Five Star Crew Best of luck to you in your search Karen Murray Five Star Crew
treichart
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 3:55 AM
Joined: 18/08/2011
Posts: 1


Ok here is one to watch out for Capt Morris Winter London River Cruise LTD. Seems like a scam to me. They have not asked for money or anything but i have a contract that states that they are hiring me (Chef)I have been to most parts of this earth mostly in the Med. Baltic country's I have a few awards and wanted to try a ship i haver cooked for Seal Team # in some places like the desert. I can handle myself in any type of condition. Has anyone heard of this Capt. Morris Winter from London ? Please respond Thank You Toby R
rodsteel
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 5:04 AM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Toby,

 

The scam comes when they ask you to book and pay for your "reimbursable" ticket through their travel agency .

 

If they provide the ticket then they are probably not a scam.

 

Take Care,

 

Rod


John Doe
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 10:02 AM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 69


You can disagree if you want Five Star, but i was offering specific advices to the situation of Diesel 1, a person who already has a foundation and experience, not every Tom Dick and Harry who manages a B1 B2 Visa and blesses Lauderdale. Just to make it more interesting at the end of your post you offered your agency services and cautioned about detail orientation, a topic Junior and i already covered tonight. Don't worry Diesel, you are the kind of person who gets captain jobs and sends the rest of the industry into a tizzy trying to figure out how to get you to hire them. Good luck, just hace patience, not patients, hahahaa.
John Doe
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 10:17 AM
Joined: 13/10/2008
Posts: 69


PS. I have never been, nor ever seen a real Captain stay any where near a crew house in the South of Florida to promulgate advice to newbies. And for the record, i am not anti day worker...they are necessary as i already stated.
diesel1
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 11:29 PM
Joined: 09/06/2011
Posts: 3


thanks for the input...i will take all that was said into consideration...ill just take it one step at a time and get my stcw and aec...but my biggest issue is i do have tattoos..a full arm sleeve..it is a under water scene and nothing offensive and its very colorful. how bad will this be for me?
 
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