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Qualification requested for masseuse (stewardess)
Rachel
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2011 8:27 PM
Joined: 24/10/2011
Posts: 5


Hello,

As many others, I am brand new, and trying to understand how the industry works... I am a massage therapist, and I am firmly decided to carry on my career on motor yachts. I would like to know if there are some specific qualifications as a massage therapist that would be requested (deep tissue, lymphatic drainage .... ). I do have 5 years of experience in this field, I also did my competent crew this year, will do my STCW95 and a stewardess course shortly and plan to begin in summer 2012. I also speak fluently french, Italian and English (would the languages really make a difference?).
Any advice is more than welcome!!! Thank you all...

Ruth
Posted: Monday, October 24, 2011 11:09 PM
Joined: 14/09/2009
Posts: 3


Hi Rachel, Sometimes a preference will be given to they style of massage which is required from a masseuse, so its best to highlight the different techniques that you are trained in, and have certificates ready. (most roles are for CERTIFIED therapists). Your language skills are a great asset. You'll need to show that you have hospitality / hotel experience, (so now is the time to get it, if you haven't already worked as a waitress/ housekeeper) as masseuse roles almost always include joint stew responsibilities. Good luck, I'd be happy to have a look at your c.v. ruth@wellnestnelson.com
Purser
Posted: Wednesday, October 26, 2011 12:23 AM
Joined: 10/10/2009
Posts: 1


We regularly carry a masseuse aboard, so also happy to take a look at your resume, and will have a position available early next year - purser@my-kismet.com
Rachel
Posted: Wednesday, October 26, 2011 8:02 PM
Joined: 24/10/2011
Posts: 5


Hello,

Thank you for your answers and feed-back. I have sent a CV to both.
Also Could someone tell me whether the insurance as a massage therapist is provided by the employer or if I have to have one for myself?

Thanks again


Henning
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 3:31 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Rachel wrote:
Hello,

Thank you for your answers and feed-back. I have sent a CV to both.
Also Could someone tell me whether the insurance as a massage therapist is provided by the employer or if I have to have one for myself?

Thanks again


If the primary question is "Is there a "Yacht Qualification" for a masseuses, if there is I have never heard of one.

Insurance; If you are employed AS CREW by the owner/captain/boat to provide this service as part or all of your job, your actions are covered under the vessels indemnification. If you are coming aboard as a Contractor, the situation is not quite as clear and can only be determined by reading the policy. You are not looking only for indemnification of your actions or in-actions on the clients behalf ( what you are really looking for is no specific exclusion, so look in the "Exclusions" section of the policy. If not listed, it's covered as far as making the passenger whole), you are also looking for a "No Subrogation Clause" in there to keep the insurer from being able to collect back from you.

If you do a lot of contract and independent work, you may consider getting your own insurance.

Ilona Holland
Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:58 AM
Joined: 03/01/2009
Posts: 1


Hi Rachel,

Firstly I wish you success in your endeavors to join the yachting industry. It is truly a rewarding experience if you have never done it, it's a great next step.

As a fellow masseuse myself I can say firstly that:-

1) I have always carried my own insurance as the boats have only covered other aspects. Some vessels do not even supply a contract and some will only state that you are the Stewardess on board.

2) Insurance is vital in all cases but especially so when you begin to serve the charter guests or boss's guests. It is a tricky situation as on a normal day to day basis you would have your clients sign a waiver which in a yachting scenario would make it a bit strange if there isn't that spa/health club set-up. My suggestion is to sort this out with the captain whereby once the boss and his guests are welcomed on board it would be part of the procedure that they are aware of massage and wellness services aboard and they can sign a one-time form in an informal way at the the commencement of their trip.

3) Some bosses will have houses for example along the East Coast or elsewhere in the States. They will most likely have you work at their private residence on occasions when they need a masseuse. Do keep in mind that some States require that you have a license to practice in that State. Just a bit of knowledge here. Does not mean you don't practice but it's always good to know for you to make whatever decision you feel fine with. Also you would have to check in with whatever type of visa you are entering the States with (if not an American), as most times these won't cover working on land. Again these are personal decisions but I'm just putting it out there.

4) Lastly it is good to highlight your massage qualifications and what you offer as a masseuse. It will help immensely.

Do not hesitate to get in touch if you have further questions. It would be my pleasure. We can always have  chat if you fancy hearing a few experiences. I can be reached at centispeed@yahoo.co.uk

Ilona



Rachel
Posted: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 4:09 PM
Joined: 24/10/2011
Posts: 5


Hello,

Thank you ever so much Henning and Ilona for your answers. Ilona, I sent you an email with more details...

All the best to both,
Rachel

 
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