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Weighing up my options
Irishrob
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 10:29 PM
Joined: 07/09/2011
Posts: 5


Hi, i am thinking about making a leap into the yacht crew career path and just lookign for some honest opnions, how easy is it to get work? I have alot of experience making and finishing furniture for some of the most prestigious yachts on the water, i have been on final snagging trips on 7 superyachts and worked on several more in the workshops would this type of experience stand to me, are there many touch ups and repairs needed? How would you go about getting a job after doing the stcw95, iv been told about agencies so i presume there are some better than others? what kind of timescale would it be for getting a first job?

What is life really like onboard, what is the staff quarters like on most boats?

Im very tempted by the idea so what advice can ye offer please to try put me off or tempt me.

I really would appreciate help on this one.

rodsteel
Posted: Thursday, September 8, 2011 4:52 AM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Hi,

 

This one is a few weeks old (there is a newer one on the same site - based on a shadow boat)

 

Good Luck,

 

Rod

 

Ref: 16164

Position: Carpenter needed for 100m+ Motor Yacht

Employment: Full time - 5 months on, 1 off. €3,000 p/m

To Start: ASAP

Details:

You should have a good background in carpentry, in particular French Polishing and fine furniture repair. You will also be helping out on deck when needed, and you must have STCW and ENG 1 certificates. Salary on offer is €3000 on a 5 on 1 off rotation.

http://www.dovaston.com/RecentJobs.aspx

 


Captain Andy
Posted: Thursday, September 8, 2011 10:53 AM
Joined: 17/09/2008
Posts: 93


Hi Rob! With your experience get in touch immediately with the 'Big' boys of the crew placement world: Burgess, YPI, Bluewater, Hill Robinson, YCO Crew and Edmiston. With you skill set you will land a job in a very short period as contractors charge an absolute fortune for doing exactly the same work as you! If you can get your CV out today or tomorrow as Monaco Show is starting shortly and is a 'magical' period where all sorts f things can, and frequently, do happen!
Irishrob
Posted: Thursday, September 8, 2011 11:33 PM
Joined: 07/09/2011
Posts: 5


Thanks very much lads its very nice news to hear I know well when monaco is iv been in until midnight tonight getting a working on a table for our stand. what are the crew cabins like? and what are the normal day duties?

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, September 9, 2011 6:22 PM
Rob, good luck. For once I am posting anonymously. Don't for Frederick's sake call a yacht a "yaught" to anyone in the industry, least of all the Captain or Owner. Happy polishing.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 6:59 AM
Hi Rob, As you have been told its great money on the yachts, and you seem to have fantastic experience. Just to give you the reality of the job....if you were to start as a dekchand your daily duties will be washing the boat, polishing stainless, fixing items, cleaning windows, and then cleaning them again. When guests are on board you will be up early to make sure the yacht is in pristine condition, getting rid of dew marks etc. then you will do washes and rinses after each cruise to get the salt off the boat. You would also take guests on the tender and water sports. Crew quarters are often not very glamorous, with bunk beds and a small bathroom, sometimes with just a curtain that you pull across the toilet for the shower. You live 24 7 with your crew so you need to be able to gel with most personalities. there are often crew conflicts. Im not being negative here, just giving the facts, and i enjoy it for the most part so dont get me wrong. Good luck, and you can only try it out hey!
junior
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 11:25 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Well Rob...first off the term Yacht Career is an oxymoron. Career implies 15 or 20 years continuous service. I can count on one hand the number of yacht crew who have achieve that goal. Very very difficult to find a boat with an agreeable schedule, atmosphere, to do your time on, very very difficult to find a boat to do your time on that stays in the same ownership for many years and very difficult to live in a small box like a caged rat long enough to call it a career. Everything is stacked against you and the term CAREER. Since you have yacht specific trade skills you might be able to stick in the marine industry..yacht...scene long enough to call it a career because you can work ashore each time your yacht crew position vaporizes before your eye. If you decide to make the jump into yachts keep good contacts with the shore side marine industry.
rodsteel
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 6:29 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


junior wrote:
Well Rob...first off the term Yacht Career is an oxymoron. 
 

Junior,

Was I mistaken? I got the impression over the last couple of years that you loved your "career"

 

atb Rod

 

P.S. I think your last avatar had a little more class than this one (but maybe it's just a resolution/size issue?).

 


UKEngineer
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 7:03 PM
Joined: 19/01/2010
Posts: 33


Rob, with trade skills, you are financially better off running your own business ashore from the contacts you have made. Unless you have an ambition to become a Captain or Chief Engineer at sea, it is probably best to stay ashore. If you go to sea, the owner will be rubbing his hands at not having to pay any carpenters ashore plus the Captain gets to rope you into cleaning the yacht! Crewing yachts without an ultimate goal to be top dog (or an engineer) on the yacht is for good looking, uneducated, unskilled people who like hard work and travel. If you have skills, why be a yacht cleaner or waitress/housekeeper? Thats all a deckhand or stewardess is.
Irishrob
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 10:36 PM
Joined: 07/09/2011
Posts: 5


Anonymous wrote:
Rob, good luck. For once I am posting anonymously. Don't for Frederick's sake call a yacht a "yaught" to anyone in the industry, least of all the Captain or Owner. Happy polishing.

Very sorry my mistake not the best when it comess to spelling


Irishrob
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 10:45 PM
Joined: 07/09/2011
Posts: 5


Thanks ver much everybody for your very honest opinions! Its exactly what i was hoping for. please do keep posting ye have given me alot to think about. What do you folks get have to do in your spare time/ evenings out there?

junior
Posted: Sunday, September 11, 2011 11:27 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Spare time ? Evenings ? Hmm. The majority of yachts are only used during the summer season...winter season is maintenance down time. The summer season starts about April 15 with a quick haul out, anti foul, inspection then the cruise begins. May thru Oct on a good program is seven days a week work...NO SPARE TIME...NO EVENINGS. You are hunkered down in the trenches seven days a week. I haven't been out of sight of the boat since April 15. At sometime in OCT the cruise ends, the boat is dead , you are toasted.. you limp back to home base then shut down and celebrate life. Once at home base life gets back to normal and us yacht crew live a 9 to 5 , 5 day work week like everyone else and have fun, spare time and a social life like the rest of the world. When searching for a good yacht job only choose yachts who follow this type of schedule and return to the same home base year after year . Avoid at all costs " drifter " yachts with no home base. These boats will eat you alive.
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 5:55 PM
[comment removed for violating forum guidelines]

Irishrob
Posted: Monday, September 12, 2011 9:39 PM
Joined: 07/09/2011
Posts: 5


haha thanks very much sounds like your loving it! Dont think the long days and lake of free time would bother me, iv been working pretty much 7 days a week and most of them are 12 hour days anyway so im not a stranger to a days work. what do ye do thn for the remainder of the year when the yacht is in home base? where do most ychts make base then?

junior
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:37 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Home base...Hmmm. Since you're European the fleet you would be working will be based in the western Mediterranean. The West med, for yachts...is a band stretching from say Genoa to St Tropez including the Balearic Islands and adjacent coastal region like Barcelona. Anything outside this region seriously effects your lifestyle, ability to maintain the yacht, abilty to work shoreside, abilty to network and as a result your long tern crew position options. If the yacht will be based in...err emm..Cyprus or Cagliari or Athens, give it a pass. Also consider your languge skills. Shoreside life is all about local people. Spanish or French are easy to pick up.... but Greek ?
 
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