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MEOL oral exam???
jp
Posted: Monday, September 5, 2011 6:03 PM
Joined: 05/09/2008
Posts: 1


Hi there , Is there someone out there who has passed the MEOL recently that could give me any info regarding the oral exam. I have the syllabus and have read all the relevant MGN's but would very much appreciate anything that will help my preperation. Thanks and Regards James
Relief Engineers
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 12:10 AM
Joined: 29/08/2011
Posts: 1


Hi James I sat and passed the MEOL oral two years ago. Your on the right track with the course syllabus MGN 156 (one of my first questions) The examiner asked my awareness of the syllabus and proceeded to go through the whole syllabus. This included drawings of steering gear and Co2 systems. Its fine once you have a little practice. you can find alot of the required study material from the Y4 written notes. If you have these you should be able to find some information covering most of the syllabus. I attended the oral prep at John Percivals in Hoylake Liverpool, I recommend these guys as they know exatly what is needed for you to pass an oral. Money well spent. I have some more notes that will help point you in the right direction. Drop me an email to rossco@reliefengineers.com Cheers.
salty spanner
Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 12:19 AM
Joined: 28/02/2010
Posts: 14


-Make sure you have a good grasp of each item on the syllabus.
-Know your certificates to be issued to the vessel.
-Know Marpol inside out. (Distances from shore, types of waste etc)
-Safety procedures for everything (enclosed spaces, machinery ops, maintenance, safety, safety, safety...)
- Fire fighting procedures for discovery/evac/isolation/management of the fire/comms etc
- Know everything that should be in the E.R. log book and why
- Bunkering procedure (from mem. there's about 10 to 15 steps you have to know)
- Know your O.W.S. design and operating parameters inside out. (MARPOL related)

They don't really care if you can overhaul a gen-set in two hours or diagnose a pump problem....they want to see that you are a SAFE engineer and no-risk to the marine environment.

Good luck mate. It'll all be over in less than an hour.




Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2012 8:10 PM
Have you any suggestions on reading material, sites or books 1 can buy in aim of preparation for the MEOL exam, I am very limited to the amount of mentorship I have access to. Looking to self study. thanks
kapt_mark
Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2012 1:58 PM
Joined: 30/06/2008
Posts: 81


I did the MCA MEOL oral exam in Southampton in 2008 and passed. The 1 week prep course was done at Warsash the week before, this was almost all self study. The main thing was to have access to the campus library. There was a little oral prep, going through questions. The oral was quite straight forward and a chatty, relaxed atmosphere, quicker than the OOW oral. Wear a suit. Dont answer, 'just raise the sails' in answer to a question on engine failure. Apparently, the guy before me did to the amusement of the examiner. Do mention valve cocks and turning gear if relevant, he was very impressed and told me I knew more than most Y4 candidates.

Not sure if the syllabus has changed much since then, but it was all about safe engine room watch keeping, MARPOL, record keeping and safety. I know the sea time requirement has changed from 48 months for combined deck/ engine time to 36 months.

Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2012 5:37 PM
Kapt Mark, What are valve cocks ? What is turning gear ??
Henning
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2012 5:54 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Anonymous wrote:
Kapt Mark, What are valve cocks ? What is turning gear ??


Turning gear is what you use to jack (hence it also being called 'jacking gear' in some parlance's in case you ever hear that) a steam turbine around during the heat up so it expands evenly and doesn't bind. We also had it in an old Atlas Imperial on Westward to bring the #1 cylinder into place for starting since you started it by dumping pressurized air into the cylinders.

Valve cocks you should know so I'll give you a hint, check your fuel level at the sight glass and make sure the level is correct.

kapt_mark
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2012 9:53 PM
Joined: 30/06/2008
Posts: 81


before start up on an old, large low speed type engine the cylinder cocks are opened and then the turning gear is engaged. This turning gear will then turn the engine over at a very low rpm to flush out any condensation or debris out of the cylinders via the cocks on the top of the cylinders. Once completed, the cocks are closed and the rest of the start up procedure continues such as charging air receivers, oil centrifuges, fuel heaters and pumps etc... More common on ships than yachts but did have then on a converted yacht once.

Henning
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2012 2:11 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


kapt_mark wrote:
before start up on an old, large low speed type engine the cylinder cocks are opened and then the turning gear is engaged. This turning gear will then turn the engine over at a very low rpm to flush out any condensation or debris out of the cylinders via the cocks on the top of the cylinders. Once completed, the cocks are closed and the rest of the start up procedure continues such as charging air receivers, oil centrifuges, fuel heaters and pumps etc... More common on ships than yachts but did have then on a converted yacht once.


Oh, I forgot about those, should have associated it with the turning gear. Valve cock is also the name for the valves that hold the site glasses on a fuel tank; rather important to open them before taking readings. Sadly I haven't seen any of that since the last Enterprise powered Miki class tug I used to run. I used to run Westward with Don Gompertz back when she had the oldest running Atlas Imperial Diesel in her, 1927.

Nick
Posted: Friday, June 1, 2012 11:23 AM
Joined: 01/06/2012
Posts: 1


Hey Gareth, have you passed your meol yet? got mine coming up and looking for some revision material. warsash have stopped doing the prep course but they have sold me the course book, not had chance to look through it yet, but hope it covers what is required.

If anyone has any advice or recommeded reading please post.

Cheers

Nick


ODL
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 1:05 PM
Joined: 18/07/2012
Posts: 3


Hey Nick, Would you be interested in a sharing the cost of the Warsash MEOL notes? I'd be happy to contribute half what you paid for a digital copy preferably or a photocopy if that is more convenient. Perhaps you can contact me privately at owendai_thentheATsign_hotmail.com to discuss. Thanks, and good luck with your training! Owen
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 9:54 AM
Can any1 advise as to weather there is a MCA institute in the SoF whereby one can sit the oral exam and or exam prep week. Secondly is it sufficient to download a certificate of discharge MNG 123 and a testimonial from MNG 156 off the internet in order to apply for the NOE. I do not own a SDB and am quite keen on attaining the NOE asap. Regards
Mike
Posted: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 5:16 PM
Joined: 27/12/2011
Posts: 15


Don't know about the SoF but having certificates of discharge and sea service testimonials is fine. Discharge books and certificates of discharge equate to the same thing.

A few points on MEOL exams in general that don't seem to have been made.

1, Know the vessels you have worked on: Know what you've done as an engineer, what contractors have done and what surveyors have been looking for. Talking about examples of things on your vessel is a great way of showing you know what you're talking about and wasting a bit of time in the exam.

2, Don't always try and go for the clever idea, go for the simple one first: E.g. if you get a hypothetical situation about trying to pump out a flooded compartment and the pump making noise but not sucking don't start explaining how you'd strip the pump down without first telling them that you'd double check the relevant valves were open and you weren't trying to suck from the wrong compartment. Another well used example is of a continuously running fridge compressor, don't go for the gauges before you've checked the freezer door is shut!

3, Think before you speak and don't worry about saying you don't know something: The examiner knows your not going to be able every question and it's far worse to say something stupid than admit you don't know something.

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, August 31, 2012 3:09 PM
cheers mike for that info. from what i have hear warsash have a branch coming to antibes very soon, GREAT. awesome advise every1 looking forward to the exam!
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2012 1:02 PM
Concerning MCA "code of safe working practices for merchant seamen" 2011 edition. A: I cant seem to download it, I am requested to purchase the material and B: the 2010 edition is over 550 pages. For us guys doing our MEOL and concerned with only the yacht relevant material within 550 pg's, does any1 have some clarity on narrowing that down? regards
Mike
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2012 5:13 PM
Joined: 27/12/2011
Posts: 15


I'd defiantly have a flick through the sections on working aloft, access to enclosed/confined spaces and permits to work. If you have LPG or lifting equipment on the vessels on which you've worked they're worth a look too, similarly with hot work. You're not going to be expected to know the code off by heart but you should have an idea of the kind of things it contains and when to refer to it. Most of the code is common sense anyway.


P.S. If you're on a British flagged ship you should have a copy on board so if you haven't get one ordered.

rusty tools
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2012 6:17 PM
Joined: 02/12/2010
Posts: 24


familiarise yourself with the M notices & publications like msn, mgn, min, code of safe working practices as mentioned, imo, solas, marpol, ism. permit to work, watchkeeping, enclosed spaces, everything you can on fire safety prevention and actions in case of, electrical safety etc, As mentioned ALOT of safety, the mca want to see you are a safe (to both the vessel, crew and environment) engineer. I would recommend marine institute study notes as any additional help as well as the above mentioned publications and finally a concise understanding of YOUR past vessels systems & proceduers.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2012 9:29 AM
can anybody maybe help me out with the meol study books.
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 8:29 PM

Hi guys,

I will be sitting the exam in less than a week. Looking for any idea "OUTSIDE THE BOX" I know the syllabus and have gone into some detail regarding what may be a few Y4 topics however Im looking for any 'trick' questions or dodgy scenarios that past students may remember being asked. Thank you.


 
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