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How young is too young?
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2011 9:22 PM
How young is too young?--------We have teens working on our yacht and twenty somethings that act like teenagers, with all the talk about older crew I would like to hear what people say about young (and immature adult crew members). Managing youngsters is invigorating when they apply themselves, but it is a tiresome chore when your constantly chasing after people to focus and perform tasks correctly. Dear crew confessor I’m tired of baby sitting spoilt brats that could not work their way out of a wet paper bag. Young crew should be the best crew to work with and most able to climb the career ladder, but for some reason yachting attracts clowns that belong in the circus.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 5:35 PM
It sounds like you have hired the wrong people. It is silly to complain and generalize all crew depending on their age. I know some 40 year olds that are less mature then some 18 year olds and vice versa. Maybe you should look at your hiring techniques and interview them dependent on their personality, experience and references rather then making generalized statements.

DaveRobson
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 5:45 PM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 20


Age is irrelevant, it's maturity that matters. I started working on my first boat days after my 19th birthday and have never had a problem, but I've worked with 18 year olds and 58 year olds that dont have the maturity to cope with the shipboard life. It all comes down to the individual and the only way to find out the true maturity of a crew member is through proper interviews and trial periods.

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 6:21 PM
sounds as if you have know idea about management or employing. checking references?? probation periods.. its not that hard

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 6:27 PM
that's a wrong perspective to have. were not all like that sounds like you need to look at your hiring methods.
Myself was 20 and running a big plastering company in Australia. I was in charge of 25 blokes all over the age of 30 and they were some of the most immature people iv meet. im now 21 looking and for a new career in the superyacht industry, am i to young?

captain paul
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 6:54 PM
Joined: 05/05/2008
Posts: 9


I'll take 'em right out of high school any day! Please let me train them right before others get a chance to train them wrong and learn bad habits.

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 7:32 PM
I'm 26 and a Captain with over a 100,000 sea miles. Is that too young? Younger the better, as long as it doesn't create visa problems for the captain.
Paul C
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2011 12:44 AM
Joined: 28/03/2011
Posts: 1


It's a shame my daughter has not finished school yet or she would send you her CV. She is in her second last year of school and changed high schools purely to embark on a marine studies course. She is also a school leader. I would pitch her against any adult for maturity and spunk.

When she's not studying, she's working in retail and when she's not working she's volunteering as a trainee watch leader on a sail training ship. She would be watch leader except she's not old enough to meet the duty of care requirements for working with challenged youth.

She's on board right now for her school holidays, crewing a voyage between Townsville and Cairns, a 300nm voyage here in Australia.

Her career aim is to become skipper, and knowing her tenacity, she will get there.

Yes she's got all the looks and the mojo to go with it, but I'd pit my daughter against any immature adult any day and I would entrust her with my life at sea. That's the sort of teenager you want.

heevahova
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2011 12:04 PM
Joined: 12/07/2010
Posts: 58


right on captain Paul, I agree with you. [ Comment edited by moderator]

seaworthy
Posted: Saturday, June 25, 2011 4:57 PM
Joined: 30/03/2010
Posts: 2


I have been on ships for over 30 years and have worked with all age groups. Some over 18s can be mature as can some over 80s be immature. But the yachting industry is one of the most age discriminatory organisations going. Everyone wants experienced personnel but no one wants to train them. The power boat 2 school gave him/her the certificate but not the experience. So how does one go about getting the experience every captain crys for? A younger person just hopes for a break that someone out there will take a chance on them and train them. Then they will get the experience. The problem is that finding a break is rare. On the other side of the coin, you have the experienced people out there that might be over an imagined age limit (set by the god of yachting) that can't get a position on a yacht because they are too "old". Sooooooo, do you want youth and take a chance on getting childlike behavior or experence and get a more mature, and quite possibly, a more professional crew? You captains and owners should look before you leap.
directorbman
Posted: Sunday, July 31, 2011 1:25 AM
Joined: 31/07/2011
Posts: 3


Instead of wearing yourself out looking after children who don't deserve something they don't have respect for. Because isn't that whats it's about, respecting other around you, and their boundaries, respect for your boat, your rules, and your lifestyle. If they can't do that then they don't deserve the position do they? Unless they are your friends kids?

This is me over here http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/yacht-crews/16738-deckhand-other-questions.html?posted=1#post133129

I am looking for a position on the right boat, with the right owners and Captain. Square Pegs don't fit into Round holes.


Anonymous wrote:
How young is too young?--------We have teens working on our yacht and twenty somethings that act like teenagers, with all the talk about older crew I would like to hear what people say about young (and immature adult crew members). Managing youngsters is invigorating when they apply themselves, but it is a tiresome chore when your constantly chasing after people to focus and perform tasks correctly. Dear crew confessor I’m tired of baby sitting spoilt brats that could not work their way out of a wet paper bag. Young crew should be the best crew to work with and most able to climb the career ladder, but for some reason yachting attracts clowns that belong in the circus.


 
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