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Messy cabins & messy minds.
Dean
Posted: Sunday, February 20, 2011 3:47 PM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


From my observations I would say cabin cleanliness is representative of mental state, maturity, organizational skills and work performance. Good crew tend to have clean cabins, perfect personal hygiene, organized work spaces and will deliver positive results in the workplace. Whereas messy crew tend to have erratic work performance, poor personal hygiene and discipline issues. Those who share cabins with messy people know that it’s virtually impossible to convince sloppy crew mates they need to clean up their act and this is precisely where discipline comes in. If you can teach a slob to be clean you’ve achieved a significant behavioral shift in the right direction and reinforced a minimum performance standard. Whereas enabling people to continue being slobs validates their poor work attitudes and performance on the job and nobody wants that.
Herb
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 6:26 PM
Joined: 21/05/2008
Posts: 14


Everyone gets and opinion. Time best spent. Messy is relative. One could be very sanitary yet not feel the importance of making ones bunk each day for the sake of your likes. I value my time highly and spend most of it doing things I and the people who employ me and those I am devoted to find important. Time I would spend being tidy or not messy is time I would have to give up spending training crew, closing charter deals, risk mitigation onboard, charity work, assisting with education of newcomers to the industry, making sure everything will go well for the owners next trip. Glad to hear you have the time to not be messy. Let us not get our values crossed. Good luck to you.
Dean
Posted: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 2:56 AM
Joined: 17/06/2008
Posts: 71


Herb I appreciate you comments, however I’ve never been told how dirty I can keep my cabin I’ve only ever been told how clean it should be. If crew have insufficient time to make their beds and take care of personal business, they will never focus on the job and there will be staff turnover and low morale because people need time to breathe, especially when they live in close quarters with virtual strangers. Hygiene, personal grooming and the general cleanliness and clutter of shared accommodations effects wellbeing. Stinky underpants and shoes strewn within a cabin is not very inspiring. Crew are human, humans are flawed and people respond positively to strong leadership, especially when it is done by positive example. I once had a captain that told me “we had no time to be organized because we are to busy” Well, sir if you are disorganized and undisciplined you will always be busy because your behind the eight ball. Therefore I recommend you reconsider your thoughts because “shipshape” is not part of the mariners vocabulary because tardy cabins and minds work well. Shipshape means everything has a place and must be in its place otherwise order and discipline is gone. Our Captain wants crew to keep their spaces clean and is willing to let us do it during work time because he knows the yacht, the crew and the overall appearance of the vessel is a reflection of the owner and his/her standards.
junior
Posted: Wednesday, February 23, 2011 7:10 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Putting you gear away and being organized is the first rule of good seamanship. No excuse for having a messy cabin. Messy crew are poor seaman. "Put away " means nothing... absolutely nothing in sight. All countertops, bunks, bulkheads, floors exactly how the boatbuilder delivered the yacht when new. Electronic gizmos and personal toys are the prime offenders. This week Im repairing...tedious and expensive...the damage caused by gizmos and toys abrading surfaces or flying across cabins, damaging bulkheads , cabin soles , bruising the edges of draws and lockers. These are fine yacht finishes and I curse the crew who caused this. Put your personal gear away...then patrol the yacht during the day...putting boat gear, guest gear or anything you see that does not belong..... away . This is not the stewardess's job...its the job of all crew.
Capt Kaj
Posted: Thursday, February 24, 2011 9:00 AM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


Dean, a cracking comment to which I totally agree.

[Comment removed by moderator for violating forum guidelines]

Cabin inspections are done on a weekly basis and I involve other key officers in sharing this task. The cabins of my crew amd mess areas are spotless as are my total crews ethics. Lead by example and employ only those that are happy to live upto my expectations and do it with pleasure.

[Comment removed by moderator for violating forum guidelines]

Capt Kaj


Matt
Posted: Thursday, February 24, 2011 5:56 PM
Joined: 12/04/2010
Posts: 2


I have to disagree with you Dean. I don't think a clean cabin equates to a hard worker. I think it's more a case of where your priorities lie. Myself, I prefer to focus on areas that other crew or guests will be interacting with. If you have a ton of time to clean your cabin as well as maintain every common area of the yacht, then that's great. But there's only so much time in a day, and I'm sure I'm not the only one who would prefer to spend it maintaining areas that aren't exclusive to myself. Now doesn't that make me a considerate crew member? I forsake my own cabin for the cleanliness of everyone else... I don't see how that means I'm a poor worker or am lazy/unhygientic... I mean I shower every day, shave often, brush my teeth 3 times a day.
So again, I'm afraid I disagree with you. Not that you are wrong, it's your opinion. So you're entitled to it for sure

junior
Posted: Thursday, February 24, 2011 7:24 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Matt..... my job as captain is to present the yacht well and prevent any deterioration to the yacht. This responsibility keeps me occupied with operational wear and tear, engineering , systems , 7 days a week. I don't want to have crew mess or crew induced yacht deterioration added on top. Keep your work area, living space organized and looking professional. Trust me Matt...if your space looks Professional.......marine industry people who dont know your name ..contractors, brokers, agents , other crew, or anyone who happens to view your crew living space , work habits, will regard you as a worthy pro and the yacht as well run when crew space....your space.... is well presented.
Matt
Posted: Thursday, February 24, 2011 8:32 PM
Joined: 12/04/2010
Posts: 2


Fair enough junior. It's not like my cabin is ever overly messy, I just sometimes don't make my bed because i dont have time. But ill take your advice eh.

Capt Kaj
Posted: Friday, February 25, 2011 2:13 PM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


"I just sometimes don´t make my bed because I don´t have time" PATHETIC. You are one of hundreds in this industry that this forum complains about on a weekly basis. Excuses don´t run a yacht nor are they acceptable. The time taken to make a bed is the time you take to blow your nose, to flush a toilet. Do you ever tell your cabin mate that you didn´t flush the toilet because you didn´t have time? Get the point?

Remember, you are living onboard a yacht as a privelege, not a right. You have rules and guidelines and have to respect the fact the yacht is not yours. You have a courtesy to look after it and understand that others also live onboard. Don´t be a sloth because you can, respect the space, rules and others. Beds get made on my yacht, if they don´t after the first warning then the second time, discipline follows. Try the getting away with your excuses in the Navy! On my yacht, it´simple, my way or the gangway.

Capt Kaj


amira
Posted: Thursday, March 3, 2011 11:38 PM
Joined: 28/06/2010
Posts: 17


I agree about keeping things organized. As a chef the galley is spotless and as uncluttered as possible. It takes me 5 minutes to tidy up my quarters. I always say, messy room / house messy life and it seems to coincide with what I see around me. I wasn't always organized but I noticed that it made life much easier. Being organized in the kitchen / galley is what separates you from mediocre chefs taking into account that they know how to cook. I dunno, cleaning up after myself takes a few minutes and my cabin looks great. The quarters are so small that if you're organized, you know where every single thing is stored and you don't have to cause a tsunami in your room to find an audio cable or your favorite scarf. Just sayin'...

 
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