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Am I going in the right direction to achieve my goal?
BNR32
Posted: Monday, November 8, 2010 4:10 AM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 5


Hello ladies and gentlemen, I have had my 100gt license for 2 years now and I am currently attending Suny Maritime College getting my 3rd mates unlimited oceans license. The thing is most people who graduate from this school usually go off to work on oil tankers, cargo and cruise ships. It is easy for them because all they need is their USCG license and with no other certs, be hired. Where as when I graduate, I want to go into the private yacht industry to be a captain of a mega yacht. But I hear of so many different certifications you need to be eligible for hire. So i was wondering if you guys can give me some advice on what other certs i would need to gain to persue my goal, I would really appreciate the information.
junior
Posted: Monday, November 8, 2010 10:24 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Who knows ? Yachts are getting mighty big these days. Ive have two young guys sail with me as summer, after high school graduation, deckhands who continued on to maritime college. SUNNY and Kings Point. The Kings Pointer went right into the cruise ships and the other became a naval architect. In both cases ,by graduation , they were overqualified for yacht work and the thought of dealing with the crazy, unpredictable world of yachts was unappealing. Perhaps things have changed ? Yachts are as big as ships these days. How many SUNNY grads. are seeking yacht work ? Your guidance counselor at school must certainly know the Yacht route and be able to advise.
Chief
Posted: Monday, November 8, 2010 9:01 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"But I hear of so many different certifications you need to be eligible for hire. "

 

If you graduate with an unlimited 3rd's and have taken all the STCW courses required to sail on that ticket you will be far more highly trained and certificated than most current MCA yacht captains. Consider taking the extra courses to get your 500/1600 mate ticket as well since you may have problems using the yacht time for the 2nd's upgrade. All you will lack is yacht experience but  as the sea time you accumulated to acquire the 100 ton and on cruises and cadet trips will probably equal or exceed the sea time required to obtain an MCA 3000 ton yacht master's license.

 

Please by all means give it a try though. We need more like you in the industry. Just don't expect any respect for your license or experience. It will actually count against you in some cases as it will intimidate some captains. But, other captains who come from a military or commerical background will recognise what you have done and value what it can bring to the yacht and its crew.

 

Good luck.


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, November 8, 2010 10:55 PM
Tell me about it! Got an unlimited ticket myself, navy and commercial background. Got all the relevant stuff, ISPS, ISM, PEC, ECDIS, DP unlimited, Crisis/Crowd, Fast rescue boat, Helo off, even HUET. The 3000 tonners won't let me near the boats their running. Say I'm overqualified, won't fit with the crew, little charter experience, haven't got drive time, etc. I submit they won't let someone aboard who will "outshine" them. Numerous interviews with this lot showed to me a thinly veiled insecurity combined with contempt for entering their turf. Now I don't sail with captains with only yacht tickets. I have seen to many a pompous amateur parading as a professional sailor. Some of them are good, but they are few and far between. Between yacht gigs I go offshore as a DP officer making day rates approx 4-600 usd. Yacht gigs I do if the captain is a real captain. Yachting is very fickle business, get your unlimited and then do what you like. Get your yacht ticket, then stay at the mercy of dodgy crew agencies, oversexed and undertrained tonka toy drivers. Godspeed!
BNR32
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 6:58 AM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 5


Junior - There isnt anyone else that I know of that wants to get into the private yacht industry. Also this school only caters to tugs and ships. There are no resources on campus to help me pursue my goal. Cheif - Thanks for you advice, i will look into upgrading to 500/1600 mate ticket Also why does the industry feel so threatened towards people who want to enter the industry with such qualifications?
junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 8:45 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Certainly they feel threatened !! Your university degree in marine science is unattainable for the majority of yacht crew. Remember that yachting is not so much about driving boats and safety at sea. Yachting is a people game...customers , owners.... its takes some experience just to figure out how to meet , then deal with these crazy people. Also consider that local knowledge, how to get the job done in 50 different ports and many countries while having fun is very important. I can introduce you to respected captains on big boats who know nothing about marine science, they came from the hotel management profession..they are very good entertainers. This is the knowledge that yachties posses, it is there only worth. If I were you I would, right now, figure out how to introduce yourself to the big guys in yachting and slowly seek this knowledge. The brokers, designers, yacht management companies. Hit the big boats shows, the superyacht events. When they know that you are traing at this very moment for yachting opportunities in the future ,they will know your name when you start sniffing around for opportunity and may be able to pass on some valuable tips. . When you deal with these big boys, they aren't envious of your over qualifications, they simply need a skilled young guy to get the job done and keep their customers happy. Youth is to your advantage around yachting. Oh by the way, if you have any spare time at school use it to learn a foreign language. Very worthwhile on your cv. I was recently alerted of a very nice yacht looking for a captain whose owner was German and preferred to have a captain who he could speak with on technical or money issues . Spanish, French, Italian...and these days the Russian.
Henning
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 9:48 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


You could be, but as you've noticed, you may be limiting your market to those vessels that require an unlimited grade license. Make sure you have your 3rd Mate Unlimited endorsed with the largest limited grade Master (which IIRC is a 500ton GRT/1600ton GT(ITC)) you can get on it. You're more likely to get hired as captain with your quals than you are as a mate of a limited tonnage vessel. The next issue will be getting time on vessels greater than 1600/3000 tons in order to upgrade your license in rank. Since that typically will mean a boat >270' you will most likely have to go deep sea commercial or large oilfield vessels since there are only a handful of yachts that qualify.

junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 10:25 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Oh and BNR. There are many Commercially qualified yachties. Its only the MCA guys who are non commercial. Unfortunately the MCA guys dominate the scene. Many countries...probably most, don't have yachting tickets. Virtually every Croatian captain, mate ,engineer I meet is commercial trained. They are well represented on the water. One Croatian Captain right in this harbour. Next door neighbor is a Spanish commercial captain. They are happily doing their thing on the 30 to 40 meter class boats. No doubt way below their weight class, but thats just the way it goes. .
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010 10:18 PM
Never ceases to amazes me how the commerical caps are jealous/envious of the Yacht Captains..I guess they realise the school time really was a waste of time when should have gone the route of truely professional seafarers on yachts worldwide. Stay on your dirty coastal tugs...leave the real exploring and ocean traveling to experienced Yacht Captains..
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 12:16 AM
There is one very clear and definitive difference between the 2......One comes from and industrial background and one comes from a hospitality background. If you commercial guys want to work on yachts, go get a hospitality and tourism or hotel restaurant degree first, or apprentice under a yacht rated mate or good bosun for three years then we welcome you with open arms.....but you won't do that because you are commercial. Well friends, these are floating hotels, combines with the finish of a fine race car, not industrial sites. There are a lot more specific skills one must acquire to do this job than you think. Any muppet can watch Stevedores load and correct charts.
BNR32
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 3:44 AM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 5


"Never ceases to amazes me how the commerical caps are jealous/envious of the Yacht Captains..I guess they realise the school time really was a waste of time when should have gone the route of truely professional seafarers on yachts worldwide. Stay on your dirty coastal tugs...leave the real exploring and ocean traveling to experienced Yacht Captains.." ------------------------------------------------------------ Excuse me, but how am I jealous/envious of yacht captains? For your information, the reason I chose to go to school was to also have a Masters degree along with my unlimited ticket and if you think that all of our cadets do when they graduate from here is captain "dirty coastal tugs", you have a bit of research to do..... ------------------------------------------------------------ "There is one very clear and definitive difference between the 2......One comes from and industrial background and one comes from a hospitality background. If you commercial guys want to work on yachts, go get a hospitality and tourism or hotel restaurant degree first, or apprentice under a yacht rated mate or good bosun for three years then we welcome you with open arms.....but you won't do that because you are commercial. Well friends, these are floating hotels, combines with the finish of a fine race car, not industrial sites. There are a lot more specific skills one must acquire to do this job than you think. Any muppet can watch Stevedores load and correct charts." ------------------------------------------------------------ I am a bit experienced in the hospitality aspect of the private yacht industry. I love dealing with people and have dealt with many different types of characters. Right now I am the captain/engineer of a 60' M/Y that I have been running for a year now which I take people around the New York area for day cruises. It maybe small compared to the vessels that I would like to be on when I graduate but it is a start.
junior
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 5:35 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Doesn't matter the size, the concept is always the same. Small yachts also bring your close in boat handling skill level up and give you people handling skills. . One problem with commercial guys, when they go yachting , is their expectations and flexibility. All of the benefits your deserve in recognition of you marine science degree ? Salary ? Scheduling ? Be wise. You already know that Americans are more expensive to hire as crew. This is your problem, don't let it get in the way of a good job. When you finally take on a big yacht you will rapidly realize that you are operating with amateur crew. Commercial guys don't like this. I see many big yachts with only two pro crew...a captain and an engineer. This means your time will be constantly required to keep the show on the road and your holiday, free time will be hard to schedule. Its the big complaint with commercial guys. Be wise with your personal life demands.
Capt Kaj
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 1:40 PM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


Be careful BNR32 who you listen to. Well done for doing your commercial qualification, I did mine also 12 years ago and whilst I have had similar grief from opponents as in this forum, I am proud to have the paper it is written on. It also gives us flexibility to go into either industry, unlike a MCA yachting qualification where it is limited to yachts. It shouldn´t be about  "mine is better than yours" type scenario, but it seems that it is exactly what it is all about.

 

Also sadly STCW 95´s main objectives when set up way back in 1978 or so, was to make the entire world a more level playing field with regards to training and certification and the acceptance of another countries license. Well it did nothing of the sort, in fact it increased the muscle flexing of a number of countries who incidentally, were also the ones that signed and agreed to the principals of STCW 95´ and 78´. They are like wolves in sheeps clothing, they did and said the opposite, or should I say, still do and say the opposite. Many countries are adamant that they have the best qualifications, the best training facilities and refuse to recognise another countries tickets. Some are valid refusals, however, most are not.

 

Usually it is jealousy and fear that drives most animosity against "outside" tickets. Stand tall and be proud of the extra time, money and effort you have devoted to your extensive training, the world can only be a better place for it.

Capt Kaj


Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 6:12 PM
Kaj, you and any superior ticket holders should stand tall and be proud. That is not the point. They are two very different animals created for two entirely different purposes.
junior
Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 6:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Perhaps they are two different animals but to infer that a seaman with commercial qualifications is inherently unsuitable for the superyacht world is ridiculous. I'm willing to bet that in a few years you will eat your words. I foresee a shift on the bigger yachts to fully professional, commercially trained and endorsed seaman. MCA guys may have difficulty gaining endorsement without vastly more sea time. This seatime is only attainble in the commercial world. To the original poster BNR. It would be a good idea to study the MCA system. You will see that they are changing away from easy to aquire paper tickets, to more seatime intensive qualifications. This will work in your favor as a university trained seaman. You will be very competitive. Should make you sleep better.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010 1:33 AM
BNR32...what year are you in? Have you done your first cruise or cadet time? I'm assuming you are trying to get through your plebe year. Being anywhere else, doing anything else, particularly on a yacht, is most appealing during that first year. Hang in there. Going the route you are on will definitely reap benefits well beyond any short term satisfaction you see on a yacht.
BNR32
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010 7:32 AM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 5


Thanks for the info guys. I really appreciated the advice. ------------------------------------------------------------ "BNR32...what year are you in? Have you done your first cruise or cadet time? I'm assuming you are trying to get through your plebe year. Being anywhere else, doing anything else, particularly on a yacht, is most appealing during that first year. Hang in there. Going the route you are on will definitely reap benefits well beyond any short term satisfaction you see on a yacht." Im in my second year here. And yes last year was HORRIBLE but got through it and now its just smooth sailing from here on.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010 3:44 PM
Try to get some cadet time on a real ship, not the Empire State. It is a completely different world. It will also give you some more insight into how things actually work. Every brand new 3/M I ever had from Schuyler was shell-shocked on their first watch.
Chief
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010 8:25 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"Every brand new 3/M I ever had from Schuyler was shell-shocked on their first watch."

And which baby mate or engineer wasn't? I still get chills when I think about being left all alone with that steam plant. The shell shock came along after the amazement of being relieved with the lights still on!

Anonymous
Posted: Friday, November 12, 2010 12:49 AM
Hahaha, agreed Chief. I remember that first night watch like it was yesterday. Any light on the horizon required the captain's presence on the bridge. I was cured of that very quickly. I should correct my previous post. What I meant to emphasize was for this gentleman to try to spend some time off the training ship. Any 3/M right out of school, that had never been on a real ship's bridge, was extremely surprised to not see 10 other people on watch with him. Of course I or the C/M did the first 8-12 with the fresh meat and put the senior AB with them at night. Same reaction to ex-Navy and USCG that were able to grab a 1-1 license. BNR32 should look beyond the extremely closed and heavily biased environment that exists in his studies. None of us, and I mean none of us, is working in a place that they ever imagined they would be back at 20 years old.
ychtcptn
Posted: Friday, November 12, 2010 1:18 AM
Joined: 05/06/2008
Posts: 4


As one of the few Maritime Grads in the business driving yachts, don't let the naysayers get you down. There is a place for professionally trained maritime grads in yachting. I have been promoting the industry for almost 20 years now, without a lot of luck. I used to know a couple of classmates that gave it a try, but they did not last long. All I can say is that my license and degree put me ahead of the game when going for jobs, although that was way before all this MCA nonsense. I started to get my MCA CEC until I saw the light and realized it was a waste of my time and money. The others are right, you will have a hard time getting sea time to upgrade, so you might want to think about doing some commercial time to augment your yacht time. In the meantime during the summer and weekends, get as much small boat time as you can, even try to maybe get some part time work on yachts. After almost 20 yrs. I am still glad I went the yacht route and not the commercial. I am proud to be a Mass Maritime Grad. class of 1990
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, November 12, 2010 2:18 AM
SUNY and Mass are fantastic community colleges. KPS
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, November 15, 2010 7:54 AM
BNR32. You should have thought of what industry you want to get into..either commerical or yachting...before you started your course...Yachting pros tend to start young on boats and learn hands on, travelling to all corners of the globe, soon learing the importance of tides/currents/weather/seasons. Commerical are more theory, classroom, technical, whereas on your ships, currents/weather/seasons make little difference to your hugh ships, it can make life hell for us yachtie skippers (80m stuff) Speaking for yachting which site you are on...I don't know of any Yacht Captain that would go to Commerical whether there was a way to cross license or not, yet there are loads of Commerical Captains trying to get into the Yachting game...which pisses me off somewhat when they start demanding commerical standards, a bit like during the 90's when a load of exnavy masters were trying to get into Yachting, what a balls up that proved to be...BTW..any Master Class 1 I have met have been top guys, real pros, (except ex navy pukes), and mostly instructors at colleges..and they are really great guys...just annoys us when Class1 Masters who have never been in command of any vessel, let alone worldwide experience, start going on about bloody paper licenses...cheers MATE..
junior
Posted: Monday, November 15, 2010 8:43 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Silly anonymous...Already the original poster is running a 60ft motoryacht gaining the hospitality, people skills, living in a small box angle right now.. He has already stated his preference for the yacht route. His early commercial sea time on ships will take him to very many ports and nav areas. His backround education in marine science will leapfrog any yachty hands on experience and make him more employable. . If I were you I would be worried about the competition coming on line in a few years.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 5:20 AM
Junior...you really have no idea do you...
junior
Posted: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 7:16 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Gee anonymous...I just stated my "idea"...you better read again. And as you can see BNR, yachties will try to throw up little road blocks. Pay no heed. By all means continue to mess around with small craft while you go to school. This experience will allow you to build up your "Yachty defense" strategies,. Just like dealing with tides, gales, broken engines, charter agents, cheap owners ... sooner or latter you're gonna come face to face with..... yachties..
BNR32
Posted: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 10:34 AM
Joined: 24/11/2008
Posts: 5


Junior, I see exactly what you mean! Its going to be quite an experience dealing with those type of people when I graduate from here. I really appreciate the advice you have given me.
Henning
Posted: Saturday, November 20, 2010 10:30 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


ychtcptn wrote:
As one of the few Maritime Grads in the business driving yachts, don't let the naysayers get you down. There is a place for professionally trained maritime grads in yachting. I have been promoting the industry for almost 20 years now, without a lot of luck. I used to know a couple of classmates that gave it a try, but they did not last long. All I can say is that my license and degree put me ahead of the game when going for jobs, although that was way before all this MCA nonsense. I started to get my MCA CEC until I saw the light and realized it was a waste of my time and money. The others are right, you will have a hard time getting sea time to upgrade, so you might want to think about doing some commercial time to augment your yacht time. In the meantime during the summer and weekends, get as much small boat time as you can, even try to maybe get some part time work on yachts. After almost 20 yrs. I am still glad I went the yacht route and not the commercial. I am proud to be a Mass Maritime Grad. class of 1990

Yep, there's always room for professionals regardless whether come through the academies or the hawse pipe. The good thing is that it's typically the best owners who seek out professionals.

I came to the same conclusion about the MCA CEC. All the schools tell you you need it to run any Red Flag yacht, and that's not true. I took the Business and Law class, and I'm not worried about taking any oral, but it was going to end up costing $3,000 for the oral all said and done and after talking with the Cayman authorities I saw that as a huge unnecessary waste of money, and to this point 7 years later, that has not proven false.

If the owner wants you, it will be worked out.


Henning
Posted: Saturday, November 20, 2010 11:05 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1053


Anonymous wrote:
BNR32. You should have thought of what industry you want to get into..either commerical or yachting...before you started your course...Yachting pros tend to start young on boats and learn hands on, travelling to all corners of the globe, soon learing the importance of tides/currents/weather/seasons. Commerical are more theory, classroom, technical, whereas on your ships, currents/weather/seasons make little difference to your hugh ships, it can make life hell for us yachtie skippers (80m stuff) Speaking for yachting which site you are on...I don't know of any Yacht Captain that would go to Commerical whether there was a way to cross license or not, yet there are loads of Commerical Captains trying to get into the Yachting game...which pisses me off somewhat when they start demanding commerical standards, a bit like during the 90's when a load of exnavy masters were trying to get into Yachting, what a balls up that proved to be...BTW..any Master Class 1 I have met have been top guys, real pros, (except ex navy pukes), and mostly instructors at colleges..and they are really great guys...just annoys us when Class1 Masters who have never been in command of any vessel, let alone worldwide experience, start going on about bloody paper licenses...cheers MATE..

Some commercial guys start the same way. I started out with a 27' sailboat I bought, worked deck on some old schooners that I hooked with living in a marina in San Diego got my 100 ton ticket, Shore Boat and Glass Bottom boat on Catalina, Scuba dive boats in Key West, upgraded to 500 ton Oceans and went to the oilfields working jack up boats and mud boats. Oil field busted and I worked tugs, ship assist in the SF Bay as well as the dredge tender to Dutra's DB-1 bucket dredge. Upgraded to 1600/3000 ton ticket. Worked inland Western Rivers line haul St Louis to Baton Rouge and doing fleeting and small red flag barges in south Louisiana. Worked blue water line haul for Crowley with 580' and 730' multi deck RoRo barges and Invader series tugs. Back to the oilfields on commercial dive boats through another boom cycle until I got tired of my quality of life which led me to the yacht sector.  So there's more ways to come up "commercial" than the academies.

A US license is a US license, there is no "crossing" to commercial from yacht problems, and it happens all the time. Oilfield is paying better than yachts are right now, and the jobs are available. Most yacht captains need some handling training, but it doesn't take long if you have someone good training you, that all applies to academy and deep sea captains as well.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 19, 2011 10:39 AM
Welcome to the real world gentleman. There is room in our Industry for professionals like yourselves to bring your small part ( But growing) of the Yachting Industry up to a safe standard, considering that have had a considerable amount of time and money thrown at you, in formal training from governments etc. Then correct me if I am wrong but when you have done your time, they throw more money/training at you, to start in your chosen vocation in the private sector. The majority of us,in the White fleet have worked up through progression, time and experience. The infrastructure that protected and nurtured you is gone. Our industry has never had this and is very much hands on profession, time to get your hands dirty. Four years sailing a desk to do maybe sail 2 ocean voyages a year ,( That’s all you will probably do in the private sector) a majority of White boat Captains have attained their Tickets on single vessel operations , out of their own pocket and pure grit and experience whether that by Sail or Motor. You have just spent many years learning half of what to know about the Pleasure yacht Business. You can command a safe tight ship and worked with crew that would not dare question you unless they had the rank. Now you need to learn your trade in your New career. I could not expect to be able to enter anything less than entry level into the Navy without any formal knowledge of a totally different part of the marine Industry. 24mtr should be your entry level into the White fleet, to give you grounding in a new industry and work your way up from there. There is a lot of Ex naval people, now Super yacht Captains out there that cannot even start the tender let alone helm it, but More have come in learnt their new trade , and are a great asset. Maybe an extreme comparison( Or not?) but ,just because you are a professional commercial Rig/lorry driver does that automatically make you qualified to be an F1 driver?? Yes as you said the system needs to be reformed for you as well. 300ft Navel vessel Captain/Master to 300ft Super Yacht Captain! 100ft landing craft skipper to 100ft Super Yacht Skipper! 30mtr Tug boat Skipper to 30mtr Super yacht Skipper! With no experience in the Pleasure Yacht industry !!!!!! Your professional approach and training can only benefit our Industry ,but you are now in the Pleasure Yacht sector. “Pleasure Yacht” should give a big clue to what sector you are entering . I am not questioning your expertise in your own environment, or your valid contribution to our industry, but you need to adapt this skill to fit in with your new one. Some! of You are entering a world you have little or no knowledge of and professing to have all the answers. Your ability to run a tight safe ship is unquestionable due to your formal training, but that “no where” near prepares you for the other half of our “Pleasure yacht” business where you are at the beginning of your education .I.E. Public , Owners, Charterers, Guests , Concierge, budgets, wage bills, refits, water sports, parties, business meetings, Children, Wife’s, Grandma, Different nationalities and cultures, HR issues, Professional female crewmembers etc etc The long term professional pleasure Yacht Captains that have worked their way up to their positions do not need to post on these forums, when they do it is concise and constructive , they do not need to Justify their positions in our Industry by demeaning everyone else. “Intimidated “by you professionals with big tickets that come straight from your industry into mine, I do not think so ! I have had to assess Bare boat charterers with very big Captain tickets on small charter boats , that had to take a professional pleasure yacht skipper with them , because they could not helm safely a small MY . When you put in a few years and learnt the other 50% of our business ,which you can’t learn at a desk, you will then earn my Respect as a “Professional Pleasure Yacht Captain” Just remember the white fleet is not just the over 24mtr sector and there is thousands of good young experienced Skippers working their way up with Actual experience in our Industry , ready to break into the Super Yacht sector. You have a head start But your days are numbered. Pieces of paper with no practical experience have no room in any Industry. Just look at the amount of College Graduates out of work! Why ! No experience. Food for thought.
Chief
Posted: Tuesday, February 22, 2011 3:08 AM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


"Four years sailing a desk to do maybe sail 2 ocean voyages a year..."

Out of the hundreds of words babbled in that incredibly uninformed piece,  those are probably  the most ridiculous. How about an ocean crossing every few weeks, year round,  sticking to a schedule regardless of weather.

By the time an academy grad gets a license, he or she has more sea time, more crossings, and more watchkeeping experience under the leadership and evaluation of a professional mariner than most MCA pretenders have ever seen.

All you have done with that post is show just how little you know about professional mariners.

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 26, 2011 9:58 AM
Calm down Chief . You have just confirmed several of the issues he has raised. [Comment removed by moderator]
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 26, 2011 10:41 AM
[Comment removed by moderator]
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 26, 2011 11:06 AM
[Comment removed by moderator]

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, February 26, 2011 11:29 AM
"The long term professional pleasure Yacht Captains that have worked their way up to their positions do not need to post on these forums, when they do it is concise and constructive , they do not need to Justify their positions in our Industry by demeaning everyone else. " Should have included Crew. Sorry if you have taken exception to my opinions, but you should read some of yours, Case closed Chief
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, February 28, 2011 7:41 AM
Gentlemen lets keep it professional and within forum guidelines , I think some of the MCA people might take exception and be offended to being referred to as” MCA pretenders”
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 7:32 PM
A very interesting discussion above... Just to contribute; Having worked on Yachts as deckhand and on commercial vessels now as a deck cadet, I have seen the working practices of officers and captains in both sectors. From this, I can draw the conclusion that whilst commercial officers have a superior degree of theoretical and technical knowledge, they are sometimes lacking in the ship handling skills possessed by yacht crew. When berthing a bulk carrier for instance, you essentially parallel the berth and get pushed on by tugs, whereas a stern-to mooring by a 60m yacht requires a high degree of ship handling skill. And on the subject of MCA Qualifications, they are considered to be of a superb standard and are respected globally.
 
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