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How many aspiring crew...
Henning
Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 7:13 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


have IT training or diagnostic level experience? Hardware and soft? Networks, streaming, satellite management and repair? I really don't need another kid with a Powerboat certificate, I need one with IT training, knowledge and ability. Want to make yourself valueable and competitive in the new age of this industry? Learn how to handle the IT/Comms needs of these boats. V-Sat, INMARSAT, multi access point wireless networks, entertainment system servers.... How about a GMDSS maintainer/repairman certificate?

How about the training community, MPT, IYT...? Are you out there providing this training?

Always ask yourself "How can I set myself above the crowd? What's my edge?" When I started, we had RayJeff RDFs as our advanced nav equipment and a VHF and a SSB for comms. Now I have multiple satellites and computers and servers all networked together with a PBX systems attached to it to boot, and I can stream movies to any of 9 tvs along with their Pronto remotes on the boat, all on the same network.

If you want to secure yourself a future in the yacht industry, this is a good skill set to bring to the table. It's not going to be your only job, most boats don't carry enough crew to have anybody that can't fill more than one set of shoes.

Rusty Wrench
Posted: Saturday, September 25, 2010 1:21 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Exactly. Too right Henning, lots of scope here for the average geeky-nerdy type to offer their skills sorting out all the problems with pesky expensive electronics fitted on the average gin palace-stench pot these days. (Junior, where are you?) After all, most Chief's are just hiding in the control room clipping our toe nails....sipping tea....

Strange that all this very delicate, expensive kit seems to 'fail' or 'malfunction' in the same identical manner every time? Sounds like job security for the nerdy, touch of conspiracy I say.....

Not much call for this line of work on a blow boat though, eh, Junior? Whatever happened to the days of navigating with yer glass eye, wooden leg and piece of seaweed?


kapt_mark
Posted: Saturday, September 25, 2010 1:50 PM
Joined: 30/06/2008
Posts: 82


It s about time the now defunct radio Officer position was brought back, and into the new Millenium. A Communications/ IT/ GMDSS/ Radio/ Electrical/ Electrician role on a large yacht would definitely be able to justify their position and a decent salary too.

Rusty Wrench
Posted: Saturday, September 25, 2010 2:16 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Radio Officer most certainly defunct, redundant role ever since tapping out ship's communications and passenger personal messages in Morse Code gave way to simply turning a dial and talking into a mike.

However, there certainly is a call for high tech Computer, A/V, I.T. Entertainment equipment repairs/service. Cruise ships have such staff, the larger motor yachts too.


rodsteel
Posted: Sunday, September 26, 2010 5:03 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


kapt_mark wrote:
It s about time the now defunct radio Officer position was brought back, and into the new Millenium. A Communications/ IT/ GMDSS/ Radio/ Electrical/ Electrician role on a large yacht would definitely be able to justify their position and a decent salary too.


Kapt Mark,

 

The skills and training for a low voltage (network) versus high voltage (azipod/gen set) electrician are different to a significant extent. I think the Electricians role should be a separate one (otherwise the AV/IT/Comms/network guy would be attending school as long as a medical doctor ).

 

Rod

 

P.S. I am one of the former (AV/IT etc. w/ BSc) and I know about high-voltage electricity, but, I would not consider myself an electrician without at least two or three years of additional education/apprenticeship.

 


junior
Posted: Sunday, September 26, 2010 7:07 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


The problem with attracting highly skilled crew like Henning suggests is that their skills command premium wages ashore. I have a mate who is highly trained in Electronics via Robertson and Siemens. He looked hard for a yacht position but gave up when he realized that he could sub out to the cruise ship , superyacht builders and commercial maritime industry at 100 euros an hour then enjoy a regular home life with his family.
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Sunday, September 26, 2010 7:38 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Exactly. How and why would an individual who is 'highly trained in Electronics via Robertson and Siemens' engage in employment on a sail vessel perhaps equipped with a limited collection of such kit, unless they were simply trying to 'sample' the Yacht businness. Your statement aswers your question
rodsteel
Posted: Sunday, September 26, 2010 7:44 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 277


Junior,

 

There is a large group of such skilled workers, a subset of which would be interested in the opportunity. However, the demographics of the yacht crew are such that the transition into the industry is negatively prejudiced and thus highly unlikely (they tend to be semi-retired but relatively young and active professionals with grown families and many years experience running their own sub-forty-foot motor or sailing vessels who love the sea and boats ;o).

 

On the other hand, as the yachts get larger and the experience requirements get more "commercial", there may be a growing niche for them .

 

Rod


junior
Posted: Sunday, September 26, 2010 9:39 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Perhaps your correct Rod, but my experience has been that by the time a person becomes " highly skilled " they're in the forties early fifties, got family responsibilities and are just not interested in the transient unpredictability of yacht life. Just look at how many first class engineers work shore side servicing the yacht industry. My friend , the electrical engineer from Robertson, is 43 , ...two kids.
SBC
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 1:13 PM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 33


Is the position you all refer to not known as the ETO. I do not know of a single 45-50 m boat and up that does not have one. Often doubling as second eng or bosun, but soon getting so busy fixing small (and large) problems, that he is working all hours. And often just a very capable nerd, who has seen exectly the nieche referred to earlier. Of course, the problem is, that even smaller vessels, lsay 30-45 m now often has the same equipment, but not the budget or accom to carry one. That is where multitasking crew comes in. Can't beat it with a stick.
SBC
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 1:18 PM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 33


Henning, you mention a gmdss maintenance and repair certificate. Where can you train for this? I have never heard of this in Europe, but would be very interested in doing this myself? Is there such a course in the US or even in the IMO sphere?
Chief
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 2:35 PM
Joined: 02/06/2008
Posts: 341


Google "GMDSS Maintainer" and find everything you might want to know.

 

Dockwalk had an article on the ETO a few months ago that might answer other questions.


junior
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 4:37 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


In the UK my mate "Dr Electro " recommends you inquire with http://www.amerc.ac.uk/ for Electro-Technical Officer training or contact the British Marine Electronics Association http://www.bmea.org/british-marine-electronic-technician/
Lauren
Posted: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 5:28 PM
Joined: 01/05/2008
Posts: 60


Here's a link to the article that Chief mentions, which was published in the June issue of Dockwalk. The New Generation of Engineers




 
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