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any tips for a first time chef doing the crossing??
nicamo
Posted: Saturday, September 18, 2010 9:36 PM
Joined: 02/04/2010
Posts: 3


Its my first season and i am lucky enough to be doing the crossing in october, any chefs out there got some tips for me??? anything would be greatly appreciated! thanks
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, September 18, 2010 11:23 PM
Watch out for Hurricanes. Take your sea sick pills. hahaha
Henning
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 9:01 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Yeah, ask the crew what they like to eat. You'll need to be provisioned for light cold food to be eaten with the hands in rough weather, "Cup o Noodles soups are also good for this especially when cold. Bake fresh bread/rolls, not only do people really like them, it makes the boat smell good, avoid greasy meals, keep a good batch of tuna salad in the fridge. When conditions allow, make decent meals. Fresh pastries are also good and "any weather" favorites. Roasts are always good as they can live in the oven for a day providing rotating watches a hot meal they can grab as they come on and that can easily be served in a bowl. Leftover meat can go on sandwiches and the veggies and stock can be reduced into a soup or condensed into a stew.

The oven is always safer to use than the stove, so keep that in mind. Above all, it's your duty to keep the galley secure for the conditions you are in. No hot liquids ready to fly around, cupboards secured so things can't fly out, sharp objects secured so people can't fall into them...

junior
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 11:02 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Cant run a generator in heavy weather. Pick up a rice cooker and a crook pot.....do your cook'n in the backround off the ships inverters . Good idea to pack a few cases of MRE's. Stay away from the cabbage MRE...crew will flare off within 4 hours. http://www.mreinfo.com/international/info/international-rations.html
junior
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 11:15 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Oh and pack plenty of pasta. My gang loves it. http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/294/pastat.jpg
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 11:44 AM
Having a couple pre-prepared, ready bake meals like lasagna in the fridge is always a good thing. When the seas pick up you can just pop them in the oven. Expect several consecutive days of rough weather. When I used to sail we would have individually wrapped sandwiches and thermos' of soup on hand. Load up on good cereal bars and energy bars for the night watch. Also, as bad as it sounds, get some of those crappy microwave pot pies and pizza pops. Sometimes on a crossing the chef and the stews are down for days, and the boys can just pop this stuff in the microwave themselves. Make sure you have enough provisions for an extra week at sea as a safety margin. It is not unlikely to have to go a week out of your way to be safe from weather. Make sure to get out of the galley every once in a while and enjoy the trip. I do my best sleeping at sea with a little roll on. Cheers.
junior
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 7:42 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Nothing wrong with Cornish pasty instead of a sandwich ......remember to stow a half dozen empty pizza boxs in case the boys call for one on the rail. Bag of Biltong will keep the cookies from disappearing .
Fifty-Meter Flavor
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 10:32 AM
Joined: 29/09/2009
Posts: 13


Never know what the seas are going to do, have plenty of food done ahead of time in case cooking gets dangerous. In the event that you do hit rough seas, it's nice if the crew has food easily eaten from a bowl or in a sandwich. I usually have plenty of deli meat on hand and do a large batch of chili, a pot of chicken and dumplings as well as the standard lasagne, meat loaf and macaroni and cheese. Quiches, quesedillas and stuffed breads are good under-way crew food. I also stock up on pre-made chicken tenders and keep a supply in the fridge for snacking as well as a pasta salad. Speaking of snacks, have plenty of them! I put baskets of them all over the boat. When there is not much going on, the crew tends to snack a lot more than you expect. Have lots of hand fruit like apples, oranges and pears, the girls usually like having cut up vegetables like carrot sticks and celery for snacks but a daily batch of cookies goes a long way in keeping crew happy. Frozen peas, canned beans and corn are your friends. With a 24 hour watch scedule, the crew won't sit down to many meals together, make things that hold well. I once roasted a whole turkey thinking it would be great for sandwiches, terrible idea, made everyone sleepy. Stay away from turkey. The crew will be feeding themselves more than they would with guests on. Make sure you are VERY CLEAR about what they crew can take as they like and what is needed for cooking. Nothing worse than finding out the crew has alreaady eaten what you had planned for dinner. Good luck.
junior
Posted: Monday, September 20, 2010 2:19 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Last twenty four hours has been heavy weather...decks , cockpit, waterways , covered in flying fish.....tasty buggers... not so good raw, best bring Bajan spices and make flying fish chips. If your dragging feathers you Should pick up tuna and dorado. Bring a BIG bag of bay leaves, gallon of olive oil , capers and a dozen glass canning jars to preserve the tuna in oil..better than cooked tuna. Get the Mojama recipe off the net for dried tuna. If youre on a stinker dont dry the tuna near the exhaust stacks...end up tasting like a truck tailpipe. Also remember to stop by an upholstery shop and pick up a whole garbage bag full of spongy foam offcuts to wedge between bean cans and glass bottles to keep the galley quite. And dont forget to stop by the pet shop and pick up a half dozen BIG DOG plastic double dish dogbowls. The wide bottom keeps your grub from sliding about, the tall sides keep the heat in, windchill out and prevents the olive from your Greek salad from tumbleweeding down the deck
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Tuesday, September 21, 2010 11:25 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Exactly. Also be sure to take a few old mattresses, cut them up into chunks and place between the sailors to prevent them colliding whilst asleep. The longer they sleep the less they eat (hint: add crushed sleeping pills to crew food; double the dose for the captain)

To pass time during the many hours between opening tins of soup and preparing cold cut sarnies, take plenty cook books for future inspiration.

If employed upon a sailing vessel, purchase a gimbled liquor/wine bottle holder for use in the galley to avoid spilling any precious booze whilst cooking and drinking during bumpy weather. Place lots of pots and pans out on deck to catch rainwater for cooking/cleaning. Be careful not to put them near the 'soap on a rope' makeshift you-bathe-when-it-rains shower arrangements on many blow-boats. If employed on a modern fabulous displacement motor yacht equiped with air conditioning, anti roll stabilizing fins, large dry store, cold store, ample freezer store and well equipped galley, disregard all the above.


SBC
Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 9:54 AM
Joined: 14/10/2008
Posts: 33


Everybody seems to sail around in storms all the time. Don't worry, the weather is actually quite nice most of the time. Are you sailing or motoring? Totally different approach is needed. Which route will the boat be taking? Is it stabilized? Junior, which boat are you on, where you can't run generator during bad weather? I am a raggie, but I really only seem to remember a couple of trips fooling around in high latitudes where I was getting chucked around so badly that I couldn't run the genny. (we are 24 hrs genny boat) Back to cookie, plan simple meals, and prepare for lots of left overs you can serve next day. There is always someone on a diet, feeling crooked or not liking the food, they eat less than you would think. So don't worry. Talk to North Atlantic fishing cooks, they always manage to fix the crew something - even in a blow! Enjoy! Safe Sailing!
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2010 12:11 PM
Of course we don't sail around in bad weather all the time, but you need to be aware and prepared in the case. Plan for the worst, expect the best. Ignorance is dangerous.
waves
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 2:29 PM
Joined: 13/06/2008
Posts: 7


I would disregard the suggestion of chilli and other spicy food, except on the calmest of days.  I tend towards blander foods on crossings like sweet and sour chicken, stuffed chicken breasts with a cream sauce, beef stroganoff and meatloaf, all these things freeze well, just omit the sour cream until re heating.  If you freeze these in tall foil roasting pans you just shove them in the oven after defrosting.  Another tip, don't add pickled onions to the Stroganoff, I made that mistake during the Bermuda race one year.  Believe me , you don't want to be on a boat with 20 guys who ate pickled onions!
junior
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 6:27 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Gee nicamo, you never told us what kind of yacht youre sailing across ? Could be one of those Gigas who throws her anchor out in St Tropez when going stern too in Ibiza, then helicopters over to Porto Cervo for dinner ?. Its not the Titanic is it ??...... bring a blender but do be Careful with the ice !!! If youre cooking...or chef'n... on a normal size yacht, the 6 quart electric multi cooker is your own personal crew. No backtalk'n, no bad hair days, no substance abuse issues, no flatulence problems, no MCA work hour restrictions, no return airfare, no visa'a, Silently working in the background, cook'n good stuff, 100 percent unattended. http://www.fagoramerica.com/appliances/small_appliances/specialty_cooking/electric_multi_cooker And SBC, running generators 24 hours a day ? Youre not on a Sailing yacht, youre watching sailing videos in the wheelhouse of a giant fuel tank with a mast. Perhaps its so big you can simply flatten everything in your galleys way ? I can assure you from more than a dozen west bound trips that a force nine westsouthwest gale in the Alboran Sea and Gibraltar western Approaches during fall Caribbean crossing season is all to common. . By the way SBC, when I was just a wee chipiron , dad taught me that when approaching bad weather .... CLOSE ALL SEACOCKS.... that means generator intake....at the same time I tucked the third reef in. Perhaps you should consult your dad, then review your seamanship standards concerning machinery operation in a gale or... what the heck....we can read about your adventures in a future Dockwalk...What Went Wrong.
nicamo
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 6:37 PM
Joined: 02/04/2010
Posts: 3


nice one! thanks for all the posts! wasnt expecting this many well its a 50m trinity with 10 crew on and we should be leaving round the 10th of october but the weather lately has not been looking too good! thanks for the posts again and keep them coming!
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 7:10 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Trinity Eh? ensure the galley exhaust ventilation fan is good, will avoid spurious fire alarms from the galley smoke detectors.......
junior
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 9:57 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Aww Jeez.....thats a big stink. Guess you'll be forming a convoy for the crossing ? You crossing the bay of Palma ? or the ocean with your Big Rig ? At any rate , No need for a slow cooker, thats sailboat stuff...do make sure you top up the fuel tanks. For cooking Id suggest http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0970552807/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books Suppose youll have 15 or twenty crew with nothing to do besides chow down and watch videos around the clock . Perhaps you can rearrange the saloon into a miniature ocean going Double D's Diner, complete with little talk box's so crew can press the button, then shout up an order ......... waffles, sausage and eggs over easy.....supersize it ! Burp.....got any Corn Dawgs ??
Rusty Wrench
Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 10:33 PM
Joined: 21/09/2010
Posts: 207


Easy there Junior, your comments seem more like concealed streaks of jealousy! bet you wish you could bark into a 'call button' to transport your favourite food to the wheel house in short order
 
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