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starting to freak out a little bit... eek!!!
haleyd79
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 12:06 AM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


i'm making the move to fort lauderdale in two months. probably the second week of september... is that a good time to head down there? anyway, i'm starting to really freak out. in an excited way and in a just plain freaking out sort of way. i have NO idea what all i need to be doing to prepare for this. no idea what all i should be packing for this. no idea what i do about insurance once i quit my current job. no idea about a million things. AHHHHH! anyone else in the same boat as me?or is everyone else pretty much seasoned in this business?!
Rigger1965
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 2:49 AM
Joined: 14/07/2010
Posts: 3


What are you coming down to do?


14Freedom
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 4:00 AM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Haley,
Start with learning the basics...like how to write. If I saw this and then you coming down the dock, you wouldn't have a chance. Crew need to know how to communicate, verbally and in writing.
ATB-
The Slacker

Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 4:15 AM
this is a forum, not a grammar lesson. instead of ripping into people, why don't you attempt to help them when asking for advice.
mondenkind33
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:54 AM
Joined: 13/07/2010
Posts: 1


I'm in the "same boat" as you! I'm moving to Ft Lauderdale at the beginning of Oct. so I can get my STCW and a stew training course before the International Boat Show. I'm trying to get a job as a stewardess, so if you are too I highly recommend reading Julie Perry's "Insider's Guide to Becoming a Yacht Stewardess," or at least check out her website. She outlines all the steps to take, from packing up your life to getting a crewhouse, dockwalking, crew agencies and resume building. It's been so helpful for me to have little goals like saving money, getting my resume ready and starting to network (like Dockwalk) so that when I'm ready to go I have all my ducks in a row. Hopefully I'll run into you this fall!
haleyd79
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 1:08 PM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


14Freedom wrote:
Haley,
Start with learning the basics...like how to write. If I saw this and then you coming down the dock, you wouldn't have a chance. Crew need to know how to communicate, verbally and in writing.
ATB-
The Slacker


wow, did you really just judge me based off of a post in a message board? that's sad. it's safe to say i wouldn't want to work for you anyway. i'm well aware of how to type, and write; nothing wrong with my grammar either (see that semi-colon i just used... be impressed). spelling bee champ for 4 consecutive years in elementary and middle school baby! LOL! just because i choose not to capitalize things when i'm typing in a FORUM doesn't mean i'm not brilliant!

 

ANYWAY, rigger i'm going down to (hopefully) be a stew.

 

mondenkind, i've read her book and have actually talked directly to her a few times. she's been a great help! i took my stcw course in february and i plan to take a stew class as soon as i move down there. i also have my CV completed already! i guess my nervousness is coming more from a fear of the unknown?!


Rigger1965
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 11:04 PM
Joined: 14/07/2010
Posts: 3


Sounds like you have a good plan. I'm sure you will be fine. Just be careful who you associate with/listen to. There are alot of jag-offs out there. Oh, and Slacker, if you don't have anything helpful or nice to say, STFU.


14Freedom
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 11:24 PM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Hey All,
That was nice...and helpful.
ATB-
The Slacker

haleyd79
Posted: Thursday, July 15, 2010 11:48 PM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


Thanks Rigger! I'm really looking forward to starting this new chapter of my life.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 12:17 AM
Why does a brilliant spelling be champion want to serve and clean up after a person she thinks she could have been ? Yachties are just servants with options.
Rigger1965
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 1:06 AM
Joined: 14/07/2010
Posts: 3


Anytime you would like to go racing with some of my "yachtie" friends and myself, you just let me know. You will most likely piss yourself and cry for your mommy. BTW......have some balls and don't post your crap anonymously.
Henning
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 3:02 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


haleyd79 wrote:
14Freedom wrote:
Haley,
Start with learning the basics...like how to write. If I saw this and then you coming down the dock, you wouldn't have a chance. Crew need to know how to communicate, verbally and in writing.
ATB-
The Slacker


wow, did you really just judge me based off of a post in a message board? that's sad. it's safe to say i wouldn't want to work for you anyway.


Not much worry there, he can't get a job in the industry.

14Freedom
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 4:40 AM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Hey All, (especially JFC as he's known in the other realm),

"He can't get a job in the industry."
You fool. I am hiring people for the industry, just brought three major players in the area to join forces. What have you done lately but drive boats and opine on everything and anything?

Ever put your own cash/ideas/reputation on the line? I know you haven't. Happy with collecting a paycheck and never went out on a limb. You've said a piece about me...many know about you.

...and Haley, it wasn't said from spite but from reality. If you won the spelling bee you must know grammar and punctuation. Use it for your benefit whether in a forum or on twitter.

ATB-
The Slacker

Henning
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 10:40 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Selling yacht t-shirts now?

haleyd79
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 12:18 PM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


Anonymous wrote:
Why does a brilliant spelling be champion want to serve and clean up after a person she thinks she could have been ? Yachties are just servants with options.

 

i'm sorry, i guess i should read my own post again, because i don't recall at what point in my post i said anything about thinking i "could have been" the millionaires i hope to "serve and clean up after" one day?! i didn't realize anonymous yachties held elementary age spelling bee champions to such high standards... whoopsie!
 
 
p.s. it's spelling BEE not spelling BE. come on now!


Anonymous
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 10:03 PM
Why is it called a 'bee?' What's spelling got to do with bees?

rodsteel
Posted: Friday, July 16, 2010 11:03 PM
Joined: 25/06/2009
Posts: 275


Anonymous wrote:
Why is it called a 'bee?' What's spelling got to do with bees?


 

Derivation (from Wikipedia ;o))

Because the word describes people working together in a social group, a common false etymology is that the term derives from the insect of the same name and similar social behavior. According to etymological research recorded in dictionaries, the word in fact probably comes from dialectal been or bean (meaning "help given by neighbors"), which came from Middle English bene (meaning "prayer", "boon" and "extra service by a tenant to his lord")

 


Brent
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 12:15 AM
Joined: 11/01/2009
Posts: 3


Best of luck to you on the move down. Been a local for 24 years now and got into yachting after a few years of college 4 years ago and have loved every minute of it. Get in touch with all the agencies, dress to impress for all interviews. Check out mptusa.com for all your schooling needs. And don't jump at the first offer just because it's a job, wait for the one that best suits you and what your looking for because LONGEVITY is KEY.
haleyd79
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 12:58 AM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


thanks brent! i can't hear those words of advice enough... be patient and don't jump at the first job offer unless it's the right fit! i'm really looking forward to what the future holds and thanks to boards like this i am learning so much useful information!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 3:50 PM
If you want to get good factual information from a reliable source and not a bunch of self proclaimed know it alls on here contact a crew agency in Ft. Lauderdale and speak with them. NO I do not work for one of them I actually run a boat but I do rely on them to provide me with good quality crew. That is a very good place to start. When you go to meet them make sure you are dressed smart and not look like you just came off the beach or from a 20 mile hike or fresh out of a night club. I went to interview a deckhand one day only to walk in and see him in flip flops, and a tea shirt hanging out over his board shorts. I turned around and walked out and no he didnt get the job. I have also interviewed stews that when I walked in I was wondering if they were there for a stew position or for an exotic dancers position. No, sex does not sell in this business and no they didnt get the job. Classy attractive will get you much further. 3 good crew agents that come to mind are Elite Crew International, Luxury Yacht Group and The Crew Network. There are many others that are also very good but these are the 3 that I would think of first. All the employees are ex yacht employees and all can advise on what and what not to pack as well as what to expect and what is required for you to get started with them to get you out there for interviews. You must get your STCW and a valid ENG1 medical. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Good luck!!
Capt Kaj
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 7:50 PM
Joined: 05/08/2008
Posts: 83


Hi Haley,

I hope you realise the industry is full of people looking for work both experienced and not experienced, if your heart is set on getting a job in the yachting industry, then I hope you firstly have enough funds to stay unemployed for possibly a few mths before you get anything. It is fiercely competitive, cut throat and sometimes nasty out there and damned hard work once you get a job, it is not a summer vacation like alot of people believe it to be. The sun does shine, but often you only see it from the inside of the yacht! Don´t go looking and contact the agencies if you don´t have STCW 95´Basic Crew and your ENG1 Medical and a good CV with no long rambling mission statements, to the point and don´t make it 5 pages long. Dress smart, keep the obvious tucked away, otherwise most Captains will hire you because they think they might have a piece of the action. Sad but true.

Don´t tell newly met "friends" about anything regarding job leads, you will lose the job to them, get to meet people in the agencies and if you get a job, don´t forget them as you need them and show your appreciation and courtesy. Divide what you hear from crew by 2 and then halve it again, especially about salaries, they are always on more than they really are.

Bring with you some condoms as yacht crew are notorious for drugs and sex, not necessarily in that order. AIDS is quite common in the industry. STAY AWAY FROM DRUGS and those that use or sell them, again, this is prevalent in the industry as is alcohol.

Good luck and have fun depite all that I wrote, it is an amazing industry!

Capt Kaj


haleyd79
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 8:07 PM
Joined: 16/04/2010
Posts: 23


thank you anonymous and capt kaj for the great information! no one has said anything to me about ENG1 medical until now... i already have my STCW '95 out of the way though. i'll look in to the ENG1 now. thanks also for the crew agency information
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 9:19 PM
I say listen to everyone. Especially most of the people on this site, over the crew agents. These "self proclaimed no it alls" are the ones who will be hiring you. They are telling you what they look for and what they want. Crew agents lie to make a sale. I would also not be picky. take anything valid for a first job....you need experience, but as kaj says...never compromise your morals. You will get a reputation and it will follow you. But be prepared to see things you never thought possible. You will eventually see drugs, hookers, sex and possibly worse. Your job is not to judge, but to take care of these people.
Leslie
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 9:49 PM
Joined: 11/07/2010
Posts: 2


Friends,
 I am new to the yachting world and would love some advice. I am going to take my STCW soon and wondering the same as most as what I should take with me to the crew houses. I am nervous to the fact that I will be leaving behind most of everything that is normal. I have been a server in restaurants and bars for the past 8 years of my life so picking up after people and doing such things is nothing new to me. But yachting and being on a boat for a certain amount of time is. Would anyone like to tell me something helpful that they experienced when they first started out? Something I should watch for, the best times to look for jobs? I am leaving the first of October to go to Fort Lauderdale to stay in the crew houses.
Thanks

Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, July 17, 2010 11:41 PM
Dear Girls, To be a stewardess is actually a steep learning curve if you have never been in the luxury end of hospitality. Think perfectly made beds, ironing sheets on beds, perfect creases in trousers, sparkling toilets, hours spent polishing glasses, mirrors and cutlery, loading the dishwasher and washing machines, 16 hour days, fingers sore and feet aching and you pretty much have your first job description. The only glamour you will see will perhaps be though a port hole or if you are lucky enough to be chosen for service and then you can add very late nights on rotation to your job description. You need to be keen, first up and last to bed, clean up after yourself at all times, never complain, be friendly with everyone and keep your knickers (chastity belt) firmly on when on the vessel. If you and a crew member want to hook up - go to a hotel on your own time when you get some. Be a professional. Do a stewardess course, if you can afford to, get a powerboat license too as it will allow you to shop with the Chief Stew or the Chef. Do not get involved in crew politics. Listen to everyone but do what your Chief tells you unless the Captain gives you a direct order and then let your Chief know first. Enjoy cleaning as it is pretty much all you will be doing. If you get a job on a smaller vessel there will be more variety to your job and you will see the outside world a bit. On a bigger vessel, yes there are more crew but it is more regimented and you are less likely to see the outside world. Go to a good crew house well booked in advance like The Neptune Group. Be aware that EVERYONE knows everyone and if you act courteous and professional at your accommodation, when the Captains call the crew houses looking for crew, your name may come up. Crew House = Party. Some are notorious. Keep your partying to the weekend and use the week for dock walking at 8am daily, keeping your CV up to date and day working your ass off - even offer to do day work for free if you meet some crew on the dock or in a crew bar. you will show you are keen and if you are any good, they will pay you or at least give you lunch. Hang out at Waxy's and the Quarterdeck but make one drink last a long time and chat up crew asking for day work and jobs - you only need one person to take a liking to you. If the crew agents don't come up with much - don't be disheartened - newbies need to dock walk and get day work experience first. Make business cards and give them out at the boat show and talk to everyone. Your CV should be short and sweet, keep to a page if possible and only contain information relevant to the yachting industry. Invest in a nice white polo shirt, a skort and a pair of deck shoes - really look the part when you dock walk or go for an interview - then the Capt or Chief Stew can see how you would look on their boat. Give up smoking if you do and hopefully you have no tattoos. If you do, you better hope that they cannot be seen in your uniform. Actually spend time ironing shirts and shorts to get them perfect as you will be doing a lot of that. Go to yacht supply stores and familiarise yourself with products you may have to use - read labels so you have awareness and it makes you look good. Good conduct is so important. NEVER give any male crew you talk to in a crew bar the impression that you might 'give out' as they may expect something in return if they manage to get you day work and your reputation will start to develop badly. Ask pertinent questions but not about things you dont need to know about. That's about it from me - have fun, keep your chin up and keep everything in perspective. If you have to serve the guests hookers with drinks, do it with grace - they are human too. If you have to pick up a used condom or wipe puke or shit off a toilet seat - wear a glove. If you have to turn a blind eye - the wealthy can be a little strange - turn a blind eye. Keep your mouth shut and keep smiling. If you are offered a drink by the guests, smile and turn it down politely. If they insist, take a sip, put it behind the bar where they cant see it and when they look away, pour it away. You are NEVER there to drink with the guests, even if they ask. Do not be a bimbo who thinks she is pretty enough to be swept off her feet by a wealthy yacht owner/guest. You may one day down the line land a Captain - but who says that is all its cracked up to be? When you have babies he will never be there but he will have plenty of pretty younger stews around him for you to worry about. Welcome to the yachting Industry. It is wonderful but also a double edged sword like anything in life. Be prepared to work harder and longer hours that you ever have and to go beyond your limitations. IF it works out for you, you will learn a lot about life and get to do things many can only dream of and you will slowly grow in sophistication. I think I have just written a book so I will stop now. Good Luck
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, July 18, 2010 12:47 AM
To the previous poster, that was PERFECTLY written. I have been trying to find stews like that for many years, but unfortunately they always have jobs, even in the worst economies. To everyone else; follow that advice and you will never have any problems in this industry.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, July 18, 2010 5:48 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


haleyd79 wrote:
thank you anonymous and capt kaj for the great information! no one has said anything to me about ENG1 medical until now... i already have my STCW '95 out of the way though. i'll look in to the ENG1 now. thanks also for the crew agency information

I believe you'll have to see Dr Grenet in the Southport Plaza just West of the 17th st Causeway on the N. side of 17th. 954 525 7595. Last I knew he was the only one on the Easts Coast doing them.

Henning
Posted: Sunday, July 18, 2010 5:53 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Another thing for new crew want to be people. Take a half day ride out on a charter boat and see what happens to you. I've had people get sick in the ICW on a calm day. Most people get over it after 3 days or so, some never do though. It's hard to do your job with your head stuck in the toilet....

Leslie
Posted: Sunday, July 18, 2010 8:30 AM
Joined: 11/07/2010
Posts: 2


That is exactly what I needed to know and great advice. I have definitely worked hard all my life and had to deal with certain things most have not in normal jobs. Working a 96 hour work week was and still is something normal to me. Thanks again for letting us pick your brain

 
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