Welcome to the Dockwalk.com Forum

 

In order to post a comment in one of the forum topics, you must log in or sign up. Your display name will appear next to your posts unless you check the Post Anonymously box. When writing a post, please follow our forum guidelines. If you come across a post that you would like us to review, use the Report Post button. Please note the opinions shared in the forums do not necessarily reflect the views of Dockwalk.


RSS Feed Print
Novice who wants "Master of Yachts, Coastal"
johanrosander
Posted: Friday, June 18, 2010 10:16 PM
Joined: 18/06/2010
Posts: 8


Hello, I'm an absolute beginner in the yachting industry. I have found out that a Master Of Yachts certificate is a heck of a thing for my CV if I want a deckhand job. I assume that it's the coastal version I want to aim for. Some of the requirements are: "In order to participate in this course, candidates should have logged 30 days and 800 miles at sea including 2 days as watch leader/skipper and 12 hours underway on watch at night." Could I solve this by being a "paying crew" on a vessel? What requirements must the vessel reach? What is it to practically do to get on board and get logged hours? I already have my STCW95. I am eager to do this, I could be on a plane heading to a boat (if it wants me) early in July.
Salvador
Posted: Saturday, June 19, 2010 12:02 AM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


Hi,

I know at least this team, you can check in mile building. At the time they were doing Greece - Bahamas, the ARC,  And a lot of independent legs of journeys if you whish to. This ones you pay for, in the site for the ARC, and, crew... seekers or crewfinders I guess, not shure now, you can offer yourself and find non paying (both sides) \ share costs positions. Some require allready some licenses, some don't!! Also try in findacrew. 

This ones you pay and go with experienced people, for sure!

 Good luck.

  www.sailionian.com/ 

ps: I don't get commission  = )


Henning
Posted: Saturday, June 19, 2010 1:52 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


For the MCA/RYA, it appears you can be "paying crew" towards your sea experience. For a USCG license, that is not allowed. It's basically any time on a vessel since you were 14 that you didn't pay for passage.

Here is a point I try to bring up in this circumstance and mentioned recently in another thread. Once you have this ticket, any mistake that you make will no longer be viewed as a simple mistake, it will now carry with it potential criminal penalties. Once you have the ticket, you are held to all the standards of a professional mariner, so it would be wise if you understood what and why the "prudent mariner" thinks before you are held to that standard. As long as you don't have the ticket, you're a lot safer from a liability standpoint. While the employers may like to see you have that ticket, you have to remember to look out for your own self.

You have a good solid year's of working and learning to do before you are ready to execute the duties of that license, I suggest you at least get a feel for what is going on before you get the ticket. The powerboat ticket which makes you legal to run guests around on the tender, that would be useful.

johanrosander
Posted: Saturday, June 19, 2010 9:27 PM
Joined: 18/06/2010
Posts: 8


Thank you Salvador and Henning for your answers. I can see the risk that Henning pointed about. I will get a job without that particular certificate and take it when I got a year or more of experience. Like you said Henning "Walk the marinas with a tube of Flitz and some rags in you pocket". It sound like a great advice that I will try. As I live in Europe I want to try to get my job here. But where would I go in August/September? Monaco Yacht Show? Gibraltar?
Salvador
Posted: Saturday, June 19, 2010 10:36 PM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


Welcome!!   You \ we'll  allways take great advice from Capt. Henning! At least I do and take them in serious consideration, real experience, best advice  . Thank you Henning

 I only took my Coastal Skipper's ( the Portuguese equiv. to YM Offshore) license, when legally required.

After years of water sports (skiing , wake boarding, windsurfing) some scary storms in month long summer& small winter familly cruises for as long as I can remember, 2 times 2000nm cruises one in sail boat other in power boat, some emergencies ( that today I believe they can most be avoided by planning\maintenence) , a 3 year Eng. course and most of all great experiences with wonderfull people. I love being in the sea!!

  I was one of those who would say:  "" Licenses ???? for what the pieces of paper, you'll need to go to the water!!! ""

   Today I really apreciate that I took the courses  !!

Henning said:

""Once you have this ticket, any mistake that you make will no longer be viewed as a simple mistake, it will now carry with it potential criminal penalties. Once you have the ticket, you are held to all the standards of a professional mariner, so it would be wise if you understood what and why the "prudent mariner" thinks before you are held to that standard. As long as you don't have the ticket, you're a lot safer from a liability standpoint. While the employers may like to see you have that ticket, you have to remember to look out for your own self.""

     This was beeing my biggest dilema in my progression.  What to choose:  Being a deckhand in a big boat, or getting a resposible position in a smaller one?

   You know what? life chose me, not me !!! As I was chasing some jobs, others were coming to me, I guess thats karma  : ),  quite like the with the ladies !!

 

  Good luck


junior
Posted: Sunday, June 20, 2010 12:56 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


No Need to pay anything for mile building. I presently have three mile builders on board...one on the wheel, one in the Nav station practicing running fix's and one doing the dish's. These young guys join as real crew, all expenses but air travel paid and they work hard. They sail with us for about two weeks 500 miles. I generally go thru about 8 per summer plus one or two offshore mile builders for the east west deliveries. If you are looking for this kind of sea time check with your sailing club. All our mile builders come from the owners sailing club. Sailing clubs need liscensed crew to operate Race commitee small craft.
Henning
Posted: Sunday, June 20, 2010 4:25 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Another thing to watch for on some of these "pay for passage" operations that unless they are certified as commercial passenger vessels, are running illegally, make sure they have insurance for the passages you will be making to cover you if you are injured. You'd be surprised how many people are running those types of programs bare of (expensive) insurance. Any time a vessels asks for crew to "kick into the kitty", you njeed to keep a sharp eye on the situation.

johanrosander
Posted: Sunday, June 20, 2010 5:03 PM
Joined: 18/06/2010
Posts: 8


If having a Yachtmaster is very good to have, than what about the Coastal Skipper certification? Will it make my chances significant higher to get a job? Coastal Skipper will eat from my budget, so I will loose almost a month of dockwalking in theory. All I try to figure out is, what is the most efficient way to get a job. I am very social and ingenious, so I think I would be a good dockwalker with or without a fancy certification . And, do you have any info of yachting in Abu Dhabi (Dubai)? Perhaps not that much competition from other western people over there? I can't find any information/blogs/agency's so maybe there is captains there that love to have a Swedish handsome, hardworking gentleman on board .
Henning
Posted: Sunday, June 20, 2010 6:46 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


I haven't worked the mid-east yacht industry, but the scuttlebutt I hear is that the pay is low, and that pretty much reflects the offers that I got from there. I worked the Persian Gulf oilfield, I'm not a particular fan of that part of the world. YMMV.

faybion
Posted: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 11:08 AM
Joined: 18/11/2008
Posts: 66


Do you have any expeience at all?

johanrosander
Posted: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 9:47 PM
Joined: 18/06/2010
Posts: 8


I am currently reading navigation + a few days of sailing that will lead to an exam. Also a friend of mine is borrowing me his jet ski. So jet ski and a tender boat license are on there way. Another friend of mine have started a deckhand course here in Sweden. It's 10 days and I'm booked for it. + I already have STCW95 and driving license. So yes am a absolute beginner now but I'm working on it. Complete in mid August. Oh, and not to forget. I also have a technical background from CNC and dental Industry + I'm a certified masseur .
proskipper
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2011 4:38 AM
Joined: 01/04/2010
Posts: 15


Ermmm..........

Most charter companies and yachts don't accept coastal skipper any more.

Insurance, don't you know.

I crewed an exam a few years back with two fellows going for coastal.

Both failed, reason, no real skippering experience.....

It's a problem. You may well get a job on a big yacht as a decky but how does that really help and driving a jet rib

isn't the way ahead either.

OK, you'll get the miles but YM is what you really need at minimum.

Your coastal exam will take place on a 42 odd foot MY or sailing, where are you gonna get that experience? They can be a pig in the wind and tide.

Remember for YM the examiner can ask you ANYTHING. Even col regs at night or in restricted vis.

You have a long way to go.

 


 
 Average 0 out of 5