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Introduction and a couple of questions
Trig
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 12:51 PM
Joined: 26/04/2010
Posts: 10


Hello there,

First off, I am so glad to have found dockwalk. As far as I can see it is the best portal for information on the yachting sector. I have been lurking these boards now for a while soaking up the information and hopefully painting a realistic picture in my head about the work you all do. However, I don't think I could ever have too much information on this. I am wondering if there are any other good websites you could suggest for me? Other forums or blogs?

I have had an interest to live/work on yachts for as far as I can remember. I am not sure when I want to make the move, or if I will make the move. My background is several years experience in hospitality on shore and I made the move to the big blue a couple of years ago. I will be qualified as an (MCA) Engineering Officer in a year or so. My experience at sea has currently been on cruise ships. I am happy with the cruise ships and I see myself doing this for the foreseeable future but an interest in the yachting industry remains.

Could anyone share any knowledge on making the move from the commercial navy (in particular cruise ships) to the yachting industry. Also, how is the job market for engineers these days, I have been getting mixed reviews.


junior
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 3:21 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


You're paddling up the wrong creek on Dockwalk. Engineering is a professional occupation . . Contact www.yachtengineers.net run by George Parkinson for any advice
Trig
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 3:30 PM
Joined: 26/04/2010
Posts: 10


Thanks for the reply and link, I will check that site out. I hope I'm not up the wrong creek, there seem to be a few engineers lurking about here and the information from dockwalk is great.

EDIT: I just checked out the link you provided. I looks simple, easy to register and I think I may have came across it before. I will surely use it if and when I decide to make the move onto yachts but for now I am just looking for some information and get chatting to people in the industry.

Thanks again.

VAL
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 9:46 PM
Joined: 03/08/2009
Posts: 2


Do not eave the commercial world until you at least have a seconds ticket idealy stay until you have your chiefs this can be done before you are 27 if everything goes right the yachting industry is very old fashioned they will not give you a chiefs job until you are 26 27 at least even if you have ten years experience at sea most yachties dont start until they are 23 or 24 so they think everyone is the same try to put your name down for some relief work or yard work before you make the jump
Trig
Posted: Friday, May 28, 2010 11:39 PM
Joined: 26/04/2010
Posts: 10


VAL wrote:
Do not eave the commercial world until you at least have a seconds ticket idealy stay until you have your chiefs this can be done before you are 27 if everything goes right the yachting industry is very old fashioned they will not give you a chiefs job until you are 26 27 at least even if you have ten years experience at sea most yachties dont start until they are 23 or 24 so they think everyone is the same try to put your name down for some relief work or yard work before you make the jump

Thanks for the info. I'm a bit older than you think, I will have my fourths ticket when I'm 25. I will definitely be staying at sea until I get my seconds and most likely my chiefs. If I stick it out hopefully I will have my chiefs in my early 30's. Relief work is what I have been thinking too. Get a taste for the work. How could I go about finding relief work? Should I contact agency or do a bit of dockwalking? Thanks for the reply.



Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, May 29, 2010 9:44 PM
Welcome to yachting! As long as you have good engineering skills you will be very demanded in the yachting world and even more with an MCA Engineer license. The industry is getting more and more professional and holding licenses is very important nowadays. To get a job (Permanent or temporary) get in touch with crew agents. You can find a complete list in this link http://www.jf-recruiting.com/information/crew-agency-list.asp . You can also dock walk; “word of mouth” is the best way to get a good job. In my experience the best crew agents are: In the US: Elite Crew, are very professional and they will send you relevant information of your potential employer beforehand. This will help you to evaluate positions and avoid going to unnecessary interviews. Crew Unlimited is also very professional as well. Europe: Fred Dovaston in my opinion is the best. YCO is a very good one too. UK: Just4Engineers. Joe will send you an email with positions available worldwide monthly. Yachting has a very unique work and life dynamic. It takes a while to get used to and learn the codes and rules of the business, but if you love it you’ll enjoy it. Good luck !!!
UKEngineer
Posted: Sunday, May 30, 2010 12:08 AM
Joined: 19/01/2010
Posts: 33


Hi Trig. As a second engineer on a 150' Yacht, (a real yacht with sails) I can safely advise you to stay where you are as you seem to want to. Once you have your Chief Motors then you could go and work on the biggest superyachts belonging to the likes of the owner of Chelsea Football Club. Salary?: €12000+per month + package + rotation etc.
abouis
Posted: Sunday, May 30, 2010 4:42 AM
Joined: 05/09/2008
Posts: 22


I am an MIT-trained mechanical engineer, yet I have been working as a USCG-licensed captain (with STCW) on up to 60' private and charter sailing catamarans for the past few years.   I'd really like to land a well-paying engineers position on a nice new yacht.  What's the deal with all these stupid certifications?  Seconds and fourths are something I have at dinner!!!  MCA, IMO, etc.  WTF!  Crew agencies have been useless, they don't even return calls.  What additional qualifications do I need to work on a private yacht, and how would I get them?  Are engineer training schools any more useless than say MPT or SeaSchool?  In any case, I think an MIT degree and 5 years as a professional mariner should suffice!


Henning
Posted: Sunday, May 30, 2010 6:37 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1049


Why not see about sitting for a USCG DDE ticket? As I'm sure you're aware by now, there really is a major difference between being a Mechanical Engineer and a Ship's Engineer.

 
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