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Paying for a job???
JD
Posted: Friday, May 14, 2010 9:09 PM
Joined: 14/05/2010
Posts: 6


I met a captain today while dockwalking who is selling his skippers job. I thought he was joking at first but he was dead serious. The way he looks at it from what I got out of the convo is that he likes his job but if the price was right he'd move on as he'd be happy going back home. He's asking for 2 months salary for the job and the right tickets and related. I'm not sure how to take it to be honest, in a way I like the idea as it would get me back into the saddle as a skipper but worried that this could be a trend in the industry. When I asked the reason behind the idea he stated that the job is $120K a year, full package for everything in the contract and who would turn down $100K for the cost of $20K. Hate to say it but I am actually thinking out it...it was a nice yacht, good shape and the crew I met seemed to be pretty happy.
Adrian
Posted: Friday, May 14, 2010 9:16 PM
Joined: 08/08/2009
Posts: 17


Weird I'll try posting again...as I said in my mistaken post it's not a bad idea and have thought about doing the same thing. If shore based harbour masters, marina people and the like can sell their jobs why can't we? I'm not ready to leave but it has crossed my mind. I would say that you should get to know as much as possible about the yacht and the owners though if you're paying a couple months salary you'd be locked into staying for at least that time period and maybe the yacht is a horror show...
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, May 17, 2010 6:20 PM
There are moments when I’d gladly give my job away, but selling your job sounds very sketchy indeed.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 12:53 AM
  I'd take it!  Only if I could pay in 4 months, to get some value, some confort or motivation for doing a great job.
14Freedom
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 4:40 AM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


Hey All,

Since when does the Captain do the formal hiring for his own replacement? All he can do is recommend. It seems to me he wants 24K for a recommendation.

Another point, does the Owner, Management or crew know what he's doing? Seems quite underhanded to me...and as for "...a trend in the industry."??? One guy trying to sell his job does not a trend make. It sounds more like fraud. If he was happy to pack it in and go home it would seem he's not into it anymore. Take your severance, do a formal handover and then go home.

I'd find out who owns/manages the boat and submit my certs to them directly. Save 24K, negotiate your own contract and live happily ever after!

If it sounds too good to be true AND it costs you tens of thousands, it is. Period.

JD, if you are seriously considering this, get some deductive reasoning skills and failing that, get a new brain.

ATB-
The Slacker

Henning
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 4:44 PM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


I've been tasked with finding, hiring and training my replacement before. On private boats I can see where there may be issues and the owner would want the final say, but for commercial boats and charter boats, it's appreciated, and if they trust you as captain, you're the most qualified person to do it anyway. I've never "sold" my job though, wish I would have thought of it.... It's really no worse than any headhunter. There are agents all over the place, eliminating the middle man and taking the pay for providing the same service, I don't see a particular problem with. While yacht crew agents typically collect from the boat, that is not universally true, and in the rest of the business sector it's quite common to collect from the job seeker.

14Freedom
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 7:36 PM
Joined: 16/04/2009
Posts: 155


JD - "...what I got out of the convo is that he likes his job but if the price was right he'd move on as he'd be happy going back home."

Henning - "I've been tasked with finding, hiring and training my replacement before."

Yes, Henning. The operative term is tasked with...just sounds to me is that the guy is looking to make a wadful for leaving his job.

ATB-
The Slacker

CaptErik
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 7:58 PM
Joined: 09/09/2008
Posts: 64


This is one of the stuppidest things I have heard yet. Since he only says that he would leave, if the price is right, then my guess is that the owner does not know. Since it is ultimately the owners decision, I would not give him any cash, instead post the name of the boat, and there is a good chance they will be looking for a captain, woithout having to spend any payola. Actually if you are looking to invest in your future, I have a nice piece of property under the Brooklynn Bridge that I will let you have, cheap, I am sure you will quadroople your money in a year!
Patch
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 8:15 PM
Joined: 29/04/2009
Posts: 6


That is funny for whoever understands the last part of this post above.
dabbott
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 9:38 PM
Joined: 27/08/2008
Posts: 5


We all "pay for a job" whether it's a cut in pay, a poor exchange rate, via an agency, or in the loss of vacation and benefits. This, however is a first for me.

OTOH, paying ~$20K for a $120K job would give me pause to think. Which is about twice what most crew agencies charge for a Captain, and they give a warranty.

I can see the changes to the crew registration form under why you left:
"Sold my position and changed careers."

I'm looking for a job but this is one I'd run away from.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010 10:08 PM
You may be tasked to help track down the right candidate but to offer the position as if you were a car salesman on a lot seems ludicrous really. How can the captain ensure that the 20k that you have forked out means that you will in fact be employed by the owner or agent? Save the cash, stick to the basics, the right job will come through in time.

Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 1:31 AM
Are you kidding? This is about as unprofessional as you can get. You will only serve to diminish our profession and although you think you might serve yourself, you will soon find out the contrary. It is up to this current generation of captains to make this industry a better one. I am amazed at hearing another story of foolish behavior on behalf of another captain.
MEFoot
Posted: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 11:18 AM
Joined: 22/10/2009
Posts: 2


Agree with 14freedom - Since when does a captain find his own replacement without the owner being aware. Also, you shouldn't have to buy your way into a job - recommendation speaks for itself without any money changing hands. I'm trying to get into deliveries & it takes the P*** when you read advert on crewfile where owner expects crew to contribute to harbour fees etc. to get his yacht from the Med to the Caribb! jeez - you shouldn't be out of pocket for helping out someone! even if not being paid as such for it!
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 12:03 PM
Henning: "There are agents all over the place, eliminating the middle man and taking the pay for providing the same service, I don't see a particular problem with." If the situation would reflect what you say, fair enough; but this situation appears to me that not the most qualified person would be promoted (as an agent would or at least should) but the highest bidder. There is a word for those practics: Kickbacks or better: corruption. I am wondering how much the contacts of business partners of the yacht sell who would eventually pay for placed orders....
capncarp
Posted: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 3:58 PM
Joined: 26/03/2010
Posts: 2


Integrity is the highest quality of professionalism. This captain is basically looking  down at those who are not employed in his position. Can you imagine how he treats his crew. Who knows? Maybe there never was any professinalism there. There definitely isn't any integrity.


Captain Sevigny
Posted: Wednesday, May 19, 2010 9:08 PM
Joined: 01/11/2009
Posts: 2


Public Law 98-89--Aug. 26, 1983..foreign, intercoastal and coastwise voyages..a person demanding or recieving from a seaman or an individual seeking employment as a seaman, renumeration for providing the seaman or individual with employment, is liable to the Government for a civil penalty
Henning
Posted: Thursday, May 20, 2010 2:22 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Anonymous wrote:
Henning: "There are agents all over the place, eliminating the middle man and taking the pay for providing the same service, I don't see a particular problem with." If the situation would reflect what you say, fair enough; but this situation appears to me that not the most qualified person would be promoted (as an agent would or at least should) but the highest bidder. There is a word for those practics: Kickbacks or better: corruption. I am wondering how much the contacts of business partners of the yacht sell who would eventually pay for placed orders....


You owe me a keyboard, I blew Coke out my nose laughing over that one....

Henning
Posted: Thursday, May 20, 2010 2:24 AM
Joined: 01/06/2008
Posts: 1052


Captain Sevigny wrote:
Public Law 98-89--Aug. 26, 1983..foreign, intercoastal and coastwise voyages..a person demanding or recieving from a seaman or an individual seeking employment as a seaman, renumeration for providing the seaman or individual with employment, is liable to the Government for a civil penalty


Where is this law on the books?

Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, May 20, 2010 12:24 PM
This is what I dont get... so the captain would sell his job, give it to another person, what about the owner???? Surely the owner would have a say in the hiring of a new captain. What if the owner didnt like the captain or he wasnt qualified enough?????
An Owner
Posted: Thursday, May 20, 2010 2:52 PM
Joined: 15/01/2009
Posts: 53


Anonymous wrote:
This is what I dont get... so the captain would sell his job, give it to another person, what about the owner????








When I read the beginning of this thread I thought it was some crank just trying to pull someone's chain. Then Henning mentioned commercial operations not caring and maybe even being grateful for it. There are fields that operate on the premise that their ticket/degree/rating is all that is necessary for qualification. Many Union contracts of yesteryear specified that the member was the one responsible for hiring their own substitutes and selling their jobs was not only common place, but the rule. This in part explains the overpriced, substandard products and services one can expect from organized labor and their non compete mantra. Among closely owned, tight knit commercial operations I can see how this outdated concept might have held on, but it's transfer to yachts would be doomed from the start.

I don't know a single owner that would stand for this no matter how much they respected their outgoing captain. Once the profit incentive is introduced, the outgoing captain's objectivity is immediately called into question and if he/she is doing this on the side without the owners knowledge, that would most certainly be grounds for termination with cause.

In my case such a stunt would never even get off the ground. My captain never applied for the job. She was recruited, based on the choices from a pool of applicants who were asked who they would hire for their own relief. How's that for irony? Captains really do know who is best to replace them! Selling the job to the highest bidder negates the value of that closely guarded pool of knowledge.   


 
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