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Day working & dinosaurs
Duplicity
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2009 4:10 PM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


Are illegitimate day workers going the way of the dinosaurs, all the kafuffle surrounding the B1B2 visa and the recent feature on visa implications of Caribbean dock-walking confirm that day working without a work permit is illegal? What are the implications for yacht owners, captains and day-workers engaged in unlawful employment? Does professional crew have difficulties attaining visas because professional day-workers abuse the system? Do you think it’s fair that locals miss out on seasonal work because illegitimate people beat the system?
Anonymous
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2009 6:09 PM
As captain of a yacht Id much rather help a young person trying to get into the yachting industry gain knowledge and make some money to live off while they seek permanent employment on a yacht. From first had experience( and I had it happen again not even 2 days ago) The locals in the caribbean are lazy, rude, have no work ethics and take forever to do simple tasks so that they can hope fully stretch the work to the next day. Usually its one older guy that has the monopoly and employes the workers for a fraction of the money you are paying. I have spoken to guys making $30 a day when you have paid $120 to the guy in charge for the service. Day-working was a way for people looking to get into the industry to survive and get skills for life in the yachting industry, make friends and get to know crew on yachts. It also gives captains the opportunity to see if a potential crew member is going to be suitable to the position. I will never hire another local day worker and will rather sign on a young illegal as temporary crew and give them the opportunity to learn about the industry. To many times have my crew had to go and redo work we paid dayworkers in the Caribbean to do.
junior
Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2009 5:59 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


It's unfortunate that daywork is being painted with this Duplicity of words like ILLEGAL and B1B2 by xenophobes and unemployable locals who believe it is the reason they are still sitting on a bar stool with a silent mobile phone . The classic dayworker is a yacht crew seeking the next position on yachts who stays on station, on location, great distances from home, while looking for this next opportunity. The classic dayworker, yacht crew, is a noble ,roguish, adventurer who deserves the respect and assistance of all yachts. Long live the dayworker !!!!!! The whole system...yachts ,owners, crew, charter guests will suffer when the time comes that DOCKWALK readers must only hire real Ft Lauderdale, 100 percent legal, monster truck driving, cheeseburger chomping snowbird s as yacht crew for their next Caribbean cruise.. Shiver me Timbers, just the thought makes me wanna chuck my seaboots and became a farmer.
Salvador
Posted: Friday, November 27, 2009 12:34 PM
Joined: 22/07/2009
Posts: 97


Hi.

I Believe I'm between both... I've a maintennance contract with a boat, for pocket money, literally, for years, crewing that whenever she leaves the marina, either if it's for a month or few hours. I keep taking the licenses required by industry standards and believe-me Allways looking for a boat to jump in for a long, stable position.

It's fun , but if a good solid stable position comes, I'll grab it...

 


ddk1509
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 2:59 PM
Joined: 26/09/2008
Posts: 1


The whole system...yachts ,owners, crew, charter guests will suffer when the time comes that DOCKWALK readers must only hire real Ft Lauderdale, 100 percent legal, monster truck driving, cheeseburger chomping snowbird s as yacht crew for their next Caribbean cruise.. Shiver me Timbers, just the thought makes me wanna chuck my seaboots and became a farmer.

I don't know you Junior, but I have to assume you're kidding in this description of the yachting professionals who have settled in Fort Lauderdale to work in this industry.  Kidding, right?

Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:12 PM
It’s much more difficult to justify having a day worker these days, because owners expect things to be handled in-house. Yachties like junior need to wake up and smell the roses, because the profiling of people and discrimination that is a pervasive element of yachting needs to disappear. I’ve worked with plenty of Americans and Caribbean Islanders had no more or less problems with them when compared to other Nationalities that day work.
junior
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:38 PM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


Well DDK, Im not kidding !!! This blog entry was about the xenophobic attitude towards "illegal" crew . You introduce yourself as a "Yachting Professional " with all its bestowed honour, yet its not in your first instinct, as a professional yachty , to protect and defend internationals like our shipmate, the poster above, Salvador . I find this the natural response of Ft Lauderdale types and as a result I consider Lauderdale crew to be parochial, burger chomping, local service, crew who move to Florida and then think they own the scene. . Do you think that international yachting could function without Salvador's contribution ? This blog entry is about whether to tolerate crew like Salvador working the docks of Ft Lauderdale or call Home land security and round him up.. And Anon poster....you live in a different world, no owner ever questions why I need daywork. ...it takes two dayworkers all day just to help us remove a few tons of sails and gear from the yacht and stack them on the quay. When the yacht comes out of a shipyard schedule, it takes days and days of hard daywork to put it back in service.
Duplicity
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 7:15 PM
Joined: 02/11/2009
Posts: 79


Junior your comments are xenophobic, because they are intolerant of certain nationalities and racist. The crux of the forum centers on the limitations placed of foreign nationals that work seasonally in specific countries. Like it or not governments determine the law and each person that chooses evade reality should be prepared to deal with the consequences if they get caught by authorities. Gray is not found on national flags, nor are there any gray areas when it comes to the immigration law and working in a country without valid work permit. Three years ago I became an American resident and let’s just say the immigration process is very thorough. Prior to the immigration process I was very nonchalant about visa’s and felt it was my god given right to travel anywhere on a yacht and work. Looking back I now realize that entry into another country is a privilege and something that should be treated accordingly. People genuinely looking for crewing positions should be cognizant of what can go wrong if they get into a legal or immigration wrangle. A black mark on your passport will cause you problems down the line. A good example of what can go bad is a DUI in American, in 2003 I was in Nassau renewing my B1B2 visa and in front of me was a South African yacht Captain doing just the same. The South African chap wishing to renew his visa was deported because of his DUI offence and this summer our yacht was boarded and inspected by USCG and immigration several times, this is something entirely new to me and as I look at the broader picture I don't think it will be long before shipyards and marinas receive similar attention. Play nice and be ambassadors for the yachting community and help keep the door open by not sandbagging people.
junior
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 7:06 AM
Joined: 14/01/2009
Posts: 1026


The US Coast Guard is not tasked with combing the waterfront, looking for illegal yacht workers. Their job is to patrol the entire US border and inspect any vessels. If you choose to sail with undocumented crew its your problem. This is not what this thread was entitled. Day work. Specifically ,International dayworkers.. An International dayworker is in Ft Lauderdale looking for a job on the yachts, once found it is the yachts responsibility to secure the correct working visa. If the visa is unattainable don't hire them. You seem to be implying that now that you have your papers and can work the Ft Lauderdale scene, all others should stand back and respect your privilege. This is the definition of protectionism and xenophobia. I have no national preference for any crew, I simply look for what is in the yachts interest. When I cant find a domestic, legal, multilingual streetwise crew I must search the internationals to fill the post. When short sighted yachties kick up a protectionist fuss and precipitate a crackdown on these highly skilled international crew we will all loose. .
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 6:21 AM
People seem to have the wrong idea about what a B1 visa and the B2 visa really is and what it entitles them to do. Business travelers may enter the United States using a B1, or 'Visitor for Business' Visa. In practice these visas are invariably issued as jointly with B2, or 'Visitor for Pleasure' (i.e. Tourist) visa. This practice means that, if a candidate has an old tourist visa, it may be valid for a planned business trip. While in the US as a business visitor, an individual may: Conduct Negotiations, Solicit sales or investment, Discuss planned investment or purchases. Make investments or purchases, Attend Meetings, and participate in them fully. Interview and hire staff. Conduct research. The following activities require a working visa, and may not be carried out by business visitors: Running a business. "Gainful employment". Payment by an organization within the US. Participating as a professional in entertainment or sporting events. Obviously there is a considerable 'gray area' in between what definitely is allowed and what definitely isn't. It is advisable to err on the side of caution when bringing overseas persons into the USA on business visitor visas. However, in certain strictly limited cases, paid employment may be possible using a 'H1B' Those entering on visitor visas will generally be granted 6 months admission (the maximum allowable is one year) on entry. It may be possible to obtain a six-month extension to the visit visa as long as the candidate will be maintaining visitor status, and there are good reasons to do so. It is sometimes possible to change status to another longer - term visa whilst in the US as a visitor, as long as the candidate advised the relevant US Embassy or Consulate of this possibility beforehand, or there was no pre-conceived intent to do so. NB: Visit visas should generally be applied for in a country of which the candidate is a Citizen or permanent resident. Applications made in other countries often run a high risk of being turned down. The most common reason for refusal of B1/B2 visas is the applicant showing insufficient evidence of social, family or economic ties to his/her country of residence that would ensure that s/he would return there following the visit to the USA
 
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